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Black hole spreads its sphere of influence

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  • derhexer@aol.com
    URL to an article from MSNBC _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10282294/_ (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10282294/) When I read this I tried to think of a science
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 1, 2005
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      URL to an article from MSNBC
      _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10282294/_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10282294/)

      When I read this I tried to think of a science fiction story that had this
      sheer scope, but I couldn't


      First few paragraphs
      "


      By Robert Roy Britt
      Senior science writer

      Updated: 1:04 p.m. ET Dec. 1, 2005

      Newfound plumes of material 300,000 light-years across are forced outward by
      the explosive venting of a supermassive black hole, astronomers announced
      Thursday.
      Observations by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory revealed the energetic
      plumes of particles associated with a massive galaxy cluster called Perseus. The
      results provide evidence that a black hole can influence the space around it
      to intergalactic distances, researchers said.
      The Perseus cluster contains thousands of galaxies, all embedded in a giant
      cloud of superheated gas. The gas alone has the mass of trillions of suns.
      The plumes, seen clearly in _enhanced images_
      (http://www.space.com/php/multimedia/imagedisplay/img_display.php?pic=051201_plumesB_02.jpg&cap=Special+proce
      ssing+designed+to+bring+out+low+and+high+pressure+regions+in+the+hot+gas+Speci
      al+processing+shows+huge+low+pressure+regions+(shown+in+purple+and+outlined+wi
      th+the+white+contour)+that+extend+outward+300,000+light+years+from+the+superma
      ssive+black+hole+in+NGC+1275.+Credit:+NASA/CXC/IoA/J.Sanders+et+al.) from
      X-ray data, are low-pressure regions in the hot gas extending outward from the
      central galaxy, _NGC 1275_
      (http://www.space.com/imageoftheday/image_of_day_030701.html) , which is one of the largest galaxies in the universe. The low
      pressure is likely the result of the displacement of the gas by bubbles of
      unseen high-energy particles, Fabian's team reports.
      The bubbles appear to be generated by high-speed jets that shoot out from
      the supermassive black hole anchoring NGC 1275. Individual bubbles in the inner
      regions expand and merge to create vast plumes at larger distances.



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