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Re: The Essex Rebellion 1601

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  • Caroline
    In the Irish campaign, Essex continuously defied Elizabeth, wasting an army which had put a huge burden -- over £90,000 -- on her financial resources (thus
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 1, 2011
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      In the Irish campaign, Essex continuously defied Elizabeth, wasting an army which had put a huge burden -- over £90,000 -- on her financial resources (thus risking the war effort against Spain). She told him not to confer knighthoods except for extraordinary service; he created 59 new knights.  She specifically forbade the appointment of Southampton as Irish Master of the Horse; Essex did it anyway.  He delayed marching, or turned his army in a different direction than commanded.  With each defeat or disaster, he blamed the Council, his officers and his troops.  Elizabeth had called for Tyrone's unconditional surrender; Essex instead opened truce talks.  Although there is no record of the negotiations between them, much of the English court believed that Tryone and Essex discussed much more than a truce, i.e. the political balance In London, and the claims of James of Scotland to the English throne.  Although Elizabeth trusted Essex, she questioned what had been said, what the terms were, and why he had taken no witnesses with him or secured the consent of his advisers. When Essex realized the extent of his mishandling, he left Ireland in direct defiance of Elizabeth's order and dashed back to court to secure a personal interview.  Showing even more poor insight, he brought with him a set of companions that Elizabeth didn't care for, and then upon his arrival at court, "broke" into her apartment without warning.
       
      In September 1599, Essex was summoned before the Council, and after five hours of questioning, he was put under (house) arrest.  His men, returning from Ireland, dueled openly, threatened dissenters, and used song and grafitti to inflame sentiment.  Instead of being concilliatory or apologizing for his behavior, Essex blamed Cecil and Raleigh for their influence on Elizabeth.  In an effort to squelch growing public opinion, the truth of what had happened in Ireland was brought out in the Star Chamber. Many of his more responsible supporters withdrew.  His household servants were dismissed, for awhile his wife was kept from his presence, and Elizabeth refused to see him.  Slowly his influence (and support) in court was undermined.  Another hearing was held, and in front of this commission he finally apologized, acknowledging his mistakes.  By August 1600, he was no longer under house arrest, but was banned from court or any public employment.
       
      Essex saw himself a victim and was now in serious debt, as were many his friends (Rutland, Southampton, Mounteagle, Cromwell, Bedford, Sandys and Sussex), his knights and captains.  This was the "unifying" force of the uprising. He petitioned Elizabeth to renew the lease on his sweet-wines custom, but she delayed knowing that maintaining Essex's credit would allow him to sustain his faction of sycophants who surrounded him in an effort to improve their own fortunes.  When she finally denied the renewal of the lease, letting it revert to the Crown, Essex took it as a slap in the face and as evidence that Elizabeth was now fully in the control of Robert Cecil's faction (with whom Essex had long been at odds). Facing bankruptcy, angry and panicked, he was only too receptive to the whisperings of his friends.  He believed he was being persecuted by his enemies and started seeing plots everywhere: to murder him, to succeed Elizabeth with a Spaniard as part of a Spanish peace treaty, and much more.
       
      A large number of military men gathered at Essex House where Essex and his faction discussed plans to secure Whitehall and the Queen, arrest any members of the Cecil faction they could find, summon a new Parliament, and name James as successor.  Essex supporters further stirred the pot by paying for the performance of Richard II, complete with the abdication scene.  Reports of this came to the Council's attention and Essex and his followers were commanded to attend Council and explain themselves.  Essex claimed fear for his life and refused to leave his house.  The next morning, Raleigh went to meet with one of his friends who was part of the Essex camp, when another of the Essex supporters shot at Raleigh several times.  Raleigh returned to Whitehall and raised the alarm.  Elizabeth sent a delegation to Essex House to demand Essex and his men surrender.  Essex responded by locking up the delegation and marching into London with about 300 men.  He believed the people would rise up with him and was rather surprised when they didn't.  When he didn't succeed in garnering support, he dallied until it was too late: government troops were already marching on the city.  Some of his supporters abandoned him, some were wounded or killed in the retreat back to Essex House, where government soldiers were waiting.  Essex surrendered after burning his papers, letters and diary.
       
      At first, Essex didn't take the trial seriously, often laughing and joking with Southampton.  But once he was found guilty, not only did he make a full confession but betrayed all his friends (and even a few who had not been mentioned before).
       
      Of the 90 people listed as arrested, only 5 (including Essex) went to the scaffold.  Elizabeth showed mercy and had 32 released without bond or penalty.
       
      Essex was certainly arrogant.  With the adulation paid him as a hero of England, he became insolent, ungovernable and to some extent self-delusional.  Elizabeth had it right when she told the French ambassador, "a senseless ingrate had at last revealed what had long been in his mind."
    • stephenmlark
      Good post. Those who Essex had knighted illegally and then rebelled with him were not beheaded but executed as commoners. It sounds even more as if he was
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 2, 2011
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        Good post. Those who Essex had knighted illegally and then rebelled with him were not beheaded but executed as commoners. It sounds even more as if he was striking whilst Elizabeth was alive and before James could succeed.

        --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Caroline" <jettdonovan@...> wrote:
        >
        > In the Irish campaign, Essex continuously defied Elizabeth, wasting an army which had put a huge burden -- over £90,000 -- on her financial resources (thus risking the war effort against Spain). She told him not to confer knighthoods except for extraordinary service; he created 59 new knights. She specifically forbade the appointment of Southampton as Irish Master of the Horse; Essex did it anyway. He delayed marching, or turned his army in a different direction than commanded. With each defeat or disaster, he blamed the Council, his officers and his troops. Elizabeth had called for Tyrone's unconditional surrender; Essex instead opened truce talks. Although there is no record of the negotiations between them, much of the English court believed that Tyrone and Essex discussed much more than a truce, i.e. the political balance In London, and the claims of James of Scotland to the English throne. Although Elizabeth trusted Essex, she questioned what had been said, what the terms were, and why he had taken no witnesses with him or secured the consent of his advisers. When Essex realized the extent of his mishandling, he left Ireland in direct defiance of Elizabeth's order and dashed back to court to secure a personal interview. Showing even more poor insight, he brought with him a set of companions that Elizabeth didn't care for, and then upon his arrival at court, "broke" into her apartment without warning.
        >
        > In September 1599, Essex was summoned before the Council, and after five hours of questioning, he was put under (house) arrest. His men, returning from Ireland, dueled openly, threatened dissenters, and used song and grafitti to inflame sentiment. Instead of being concilliatory or apologizing for his behavior, Essex blamed Cecil and Raleigh for their influence on Elizabeth. In an effort to squelch growing public opinion, the truth of what had happened in Ireland was brought out in the Star Chamber. Many of his more responsible supporters withdrew. His household servants were dismissed, for awhile his wife was kept from his presence, and Elizabeth refused to see him. Slowly his influence (and support) in court was undermined. Another hearing was held, and in front of this commission he finally apologized, acknowledging his mistakes. By August 1600, he was no longer under house arrest, but was banned from court or any public employment.
        >
        > Essex saw himself a victim and was now in serious debt, as were many his friends (Rutland, Southampton, Mounteagle, Cromwell, Bedford, Sandys and Sussex), his knights and captains. This was the "unifying" force of the uprising. He petitioned Elizabeth to renew the lease on his sweet-wines custom, but she delayed knowing that maintaining Essex's credit would allow him to sustain his faction of sycophants who surrounded him in an effort to improve their own fortunes. When she finally denied the renewal of the lease, letting it revert to the Crown, Essex took it as a slap in the face and as evidence that Elizabeth was now fully in the control of Robert Cecil's faction (with whom Essex had long been at odds). Facing bankruptcy, angry and panicked, he was only too receptive to the whisperings of his friends. He believed he was being persecuted by his enemies and started seeing plots everywhere: to murder him, to succeed Elizabeth with a Spaniard as part of a Spanish peace treaty, and much more.
        >
        > A large number of military men gathered at Essex House where Essex and his faction discussed plans to secure Whitehall and the Queen, arrest any members of the Cecil faction they could find, summon a new Parliament, and name James as successor. Essex supporters further stirred the pot by paying for the performance of Richard II, complete with the abdication scene. Reports of this came to the Council's attention and Essex and his followers were commanded to attend Council and explain themselves. Essex claimed fear for his life and refused to leave his house. The next morning, Raleigh went to meet with one of his friends who was part of the Essex camp, when another of the Essex supporters shot at Raleigh several times. Raleigh returned to Whitehall and raised the alarm. Elizabeth sent a delegation to Essex House to demand Essex and his men surrender. Essex responded by locking up the delegation and marching into London with about 300 men. He believed the people would rise up with him and was rather surprised when they didn't. When he didn't succeed in garnering support, he dallied until it was too late: government troops were already marching on the city. Some of his supporters abandoned him, some were wounded or killed in the retreat back to Essex House, where government soldiers were waiting. Essex surrendered after burning his papers, letters and diary.
        >
        > At first, Essex didn't take the trial seriously, often laughing and joking with Southampton. But once he was found guilty, not only did he make a full confession but betrayed all his friends (and even a few who had not been mentioned before).
        >
        > Of the 90 people listed as arrested, only 5 (including Essex) went to the scaffold. Elizabeth showed mercy and had 32 released without bond or penalty.
        >
        > Essex was certainly arrogant. With the adulation paid him as a hero of England, he became insolent, ungovernable and to some extent self-delusional. Elizabeth had it right when she told the French ambassador, "a senseless ingrate had at last revealed what had long been in his mind."
        >
      • Caroline
        Oddly enough, Stepehn, Essex himself had corresponded with James, and one of his objectives was to secure the succession for James. Many of my resources say
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 2, 2011
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          Oddly enough, Stepehn, Essex himself had corresponded with James, and one of his objectives was to secure the succession for James.  Many of my resources say it was a case of a man who felt himself entitled to a certain position, had fallen far due to his own actions but took no responsibility and blamed others, fell into deep depression, and was surrounded by rabblerousers who played on his fear, paranoia and ego.  He truly believed that Elizabeth was under the influence of his enemies who were out to destroy not only him, but Elizabeth and the country.  He was going to rescue Elizabeth and therefore the country, and be restored to favor and have his revenge on those whom he perceived had ruined him.
           
          Caroline
        • William Barber
          He and Raleigh seem to have been on collision course ________________________________ From: Caroline To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 2, 2011
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            He and Raleigh seem to have been on collision course



            From: Caroline <jettdonovan@...>
            To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sat, July 2, 2011 11:51:15 AM
            Subject: [sceptredisle] Re: The Essex Rebellion 1601

             

            Oddly enough, Stepehn, Essex himself had corresponded with James, and one of his objectives was to secure the succession for James.  Many of my resources say it was a case of a man who felt himself entitled to a certain position, had fallen far due to his own actions but took no responsibility and blamed others, fell into deep depression, and was surrounded by rabblerousers who played on his fear, paranoia and ego.  He truly believed that Elizabeth was under the influence of his enemies who were out to destroy not only him, but Elizabeth and the country.  He was going to rescue Elizabeth and therefore the country, and be restored to favor and have his revenge on those whom he perceived had ruined him.
             
            Caroline
          • William Barber
            Wonder if he was dumb enough to think he could pull off the same stunt as Buckingham tried in the reign of Richard III. A couple of king wannabes with Edward
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 2, 2011
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              Wonder if he was dumb enough to think he could pull off the same stunt as Buckingham tried in the reign of Richard III. A couple of king wannabes with Edward III's blood in their veins.



              From: stephenmlark <stephenmlark@...>
              To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sat, July 2, 2011 5:19:49 AM
              Subject: [sceptredisle] Re: The Essex Rebellion 1601

               

              Good post. Those who Essex had knighted illegally and then rebelled with him were not beheaded but executed as commoners. It sounds even more as if he was striking whilst Elizabeth was alive and before James could succeed.

              --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Caroline" <jettdonovan@...> wrote:
              >
              > In the Irish campaign, Essex continuously defied Elizabeth, wasting an army which had put a huge burden -- over £90,000 -- on her financial resources (thus risking the war effort against Spain). She told him not to confer knighthoods except for extraordinary service; he created 59 new knights. She specifically forbade the appointment of Southampton as Irish Master of the Horse; Essex did it anyway. He delayed marching, or turned his army in a different direction than commanded. With each defeat or disaster, he blamed the Council, his officers and his troops. Elizabeth had called for Tyrone's unconditional surrender; Essex instead opened truce talks. Although there is no record of the negotiations between them, much of the English court believed that Tyrone and Essex discussed much more than a truce, i.e. the political balance In London, and the claims of James of Scotland to the English throne. Although Elizabeth trusted Essex, she questioned what had been said, what the terms were, and why he had taken no witnesses with him or secured the consent of his advisers. When Essex realized the extent of his mishandling, he left Ireland in direct defiance of Elizabeth's order and dashed back to court to secure a personal interview. Showing even more poor insight, he brought with him a set of companions that Elizabeth didn't care for, and then upon his arrival at court, "broke" into her apartment without warning.
              >
              > In September 1599, Essex was summoned before the Council, and after five hours of questioning, he was put under (house) arrest. His men, returning from Ireland, dueled openly, threatened dissenters, and used song and grafitti to inflame sentiment. Instead of being concilliatory or apologizing for his behavior, Essex blamed Cecil and Raleigh for their influence on Elizabeth. In an effort to squelch growing public opinion, the truth of what had happened in Ireland was brought out in the Star Chamber. Many of his more responsible supporters withdrew. His household servants were dismissed, for awhile his wife was kept from his presence, and Elizabeth refused to see him. Slowly his influence (and support) in court was undermined. Another hearing was held, and in front of this commission he finally apologized, acknowledging his mistakes. By August 1600, he was no longer under house arrest, but was banned from court or any public employment.
              >
              > Essex saw himself a victim and was now in serious debt, as were many his friends (Rutland, Southampton, Mounteagle, Cromwell, Bedford, Sandys and Sussex), his knights and captains. This was the "unifying" force of the uprising. He petitioned Elizabeth to renew the lease on his sweet-wines custom, but she delayed knowing that maintaining Essex's credit would allow him to sustain his faction of sycophants who surrounded him in an effort to improve their own fortunes. When she finally denied the renewal of the lease, letting it revert to the Crown, Essex took it as a slap in the face and as evidence that Elizabeth was now fully in the control of Robert Cecil's faction (with whom Essex had long been at odds). Facing bankruptcy, angry and panicked, he was only too receptive to the whisperings of his friends. He believed he was being persecuted by his enemies and started seeing plots everywhere: to murder him, to succeed Elizabeth with a Spaniard as part of a Spanish peace treaty, and much more.
              >
              > A large number of military men gathered at Essex House where Essex and his faction discussed plans to secure Whitehall and the Queen, arrest any members of the Cecil faction they could find, summon a new Parliament, and name James as successor. Essex supporters further stirred the pot by paying for the performance of Richard II, complete with the abdication scene. Reports of this came to the Council's attention and Essex and his followers were commanded to attend Council and explain themselves. Essex claimed fear for his life and refused to leave his house. The next morning, Raleigh went to meet with one of his friends who was part of the Essex camp, when another of the Essex supporters shot at Raleigh several times. Raleigh returned to Whitehall and raised the alarm. Elizabeth sent a delegation to Essex House to demand Essex and his men surrender. Essex responded by locking up the delegation and marching into London with about 300 men. He believed the people would rise up with him and was rather surprised when they didn't. When he didn't succeed in garnering support, he dallied until it was too late: government troops were already marching on the city. Some of his supporters abandoned him, some were wounded or killed in the retreat back to Essex House, where government soldiers were waiting. Essex surrendered after burning his papers, letters and diary.
              >
              > At first, Essex didn't take the trial seriously, often laughing and joking with Southampton. But once he was found guilty, not only did he make a full confession but betrayed all his friends (and even a few who had not been mentioned before).
              >
              > Of the 90 people listed as arrested, only 5 (including Essex) went to the scaffold. Elizabeth showed mercy and had 32 released without bond or penalty.
              >
              > Essex was certainly arrogant. With the adulation paid him as a hero of England, he became insolent, ungovernable and to some extent self-delusional. Elizabeth had it right when she told the French ambassador, "a senseless ingrate had at last revealed what had long been in his mind."
              >

            • stephenmlark
              I wonder - The Tydder s spin doctors claim that Buckingham was rebelling on his behalf in 1483 but I know who would have been crowned had he succeeded.
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 2, 2011
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                I wonder - The Tydder's spin doctors claim that Buckingham was rebelling on his behalf in 1483 but I know who would have been crowned had he succeeded. Similarly, Essex failed and James succeeded naturally.

                --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Caroline" <jettdonovan@...> wrote:
                >
                > Oddly enough, Stepehn, Essex himself had corresponded with James, and one of his objectives was to secure the succession for James. Many of my resources say it was a case of a man who felt himself entitled to a certain position, had fallen far due to his own actions but took no responsibility and blamed others, fell into deep depression, and was surrounded by rabblerousers who played on his fear, paranoia and ego. He truly believed that Elizabeth was under the influence of his enemies who were out to destroy not only him, but Elizabeth and the country. He was going to rescue Elizabeth and therefore the country, and be restored to favor and have his revenge on those whom he perceived had ruined him.
                >
                > Caroline
                >
              • Caroline
                I don t think it was Essex s intention of taking the throne for himself at all. And yes, William, Essex counted Raleigh as one of his enemies who he perceived
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 3, 2011
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                  I don't think it was Essex's intention of taking the throne for himself at all.
                   
                  And yes, William, Essex counted Raleigh as one of his enemies who he perceived now had "control" over Elizabeth.
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