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Re: More anachronisms on TV historical fiction

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  • Stephen Lark
    Good information here. Incidentally, the legend of Arthur and Merlin is usually assigned to the FIFTH century, shortly after the end of Roman rule in England
    Message 1 of 20 , Nov 1, 2008
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      Good information here.

      Incidentally, the legend of Arthur and Merlin is usually assigned to
      the FIFTH century, shortly after the end of Roman rule in England and
      just before Cerdic arrived.

      Will they be using mobile 'phones this week?

      --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, S.Kevin Wojtaszek <skevin1@...>
      wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Ok, so let's assume that anachronisms do not follow in the wake of
      a wizard travelling backwards through time. This is what Wikipedia
      has to say about the invention of telescopes and eyeglasses.
      > History of the telescope
      > From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      > The earliest known working telescopes appeared in 1608 and are
      credited to Hans Lippershey and Zacharias Janssen, spectacle-makers
      in Middelburg, and Jacob Metius of Alkmaar. The design of these early
      refracting telescopes consisted of a convex objective lens and a
      concave eyepiece. Galileo greatly improved upon this design the
      following year. In 1611, Johannes Kepler described how a telescope
      could be made with a convex objective and eyepiece lens and by 1655
      astronomers such as Christiaan Huygens were building powerful but
      extremely large and unwieldy Keplerian telescopes with compound
      eyepieces.
      >
      > Invention of eyeglasses
      >
      >
      >
      > Around 1284 in Italy, Salvino D'Armate is credited with inventing
      the first wearable eye glasses.[7] The earliest pictorial evidence
      for the use of eyeglasses, however, is Tomaso da Modena's 1352
      portrait of the cardinal Hugh de Provence reading in a scriptorium.
      Another early example would be a depiction of eyeglasses found north
      of the Alpes in an altarpiece of the church of Bad Wildungen,
      Germany, in 1403.
      > Many theories abound for who should be credited for the invention
      of traditional eyeglasses. In 1676, Francesco Redi, a professor of
      medicine at the University of Pisa, wrote that he possessed a 1289
      manuscript whose author complains that he would be unable to read or
      write were it not for the recent invention of glasses. He also
      produced a record of a sermon given in 1305, in which the speaker, a
      Dominican monk named Fra Giordano da Rivalto, remarked that glasses
      had been invented less than twenty years previously, and that he had
      met the inventor. Based on this evidence, Redi credited another
      Dominican monk, Fra Alessandro da Spina of Pisa, with the re-
      invention of glasses after their original inventor kept them a
      secret, a claim contained in da Spina's obituary record.[8]
      >
      >
      >
      > Other stories, possibly legendary, credit Roger Bacon with the
      invention. Bacon is known to have made one of the first recorded
      references to the magnifying properties of lenses in 1262,[9] though
      this was predated by Alhazen's Book of Optics in 1021.[3] Bacon's
      treatise De iride ("On the Rainbow"), which was written while he was
      a student of Robert Grosseteste, no later than 1235, mentions using
      optics to "read the smallest letters at incredible distances". While
      the exact date and inventor may be forever disputed, it is almost
      certainly clear that spectacles were invented between 1280 and 1300
      in Italy.[1]
      >
      > These early spectacles had convex lenses that could correct both
      hyperopia (farsightedness), and the presbyopia that commonly develops
      as a symptom of aging. Nicholas of Cusa is believed to have
      discovered the benefits of concave lens in the treatment of myopia
      (nearsightedness). However, it was not until 1604 that Johannes
      Kepler published in his treatise on optics and astronomy, the first
      correct explanation as to why convex and concave lenses could correct
      presbyopia and myopia.
      >
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
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    • Anne Gilbert
      Kevin: I knew it! I knew it! Eyeglasses were invented in the 13th century!(grin) Anne G Ok, so let’s assume that anachronisms do not follow in the wake of
      Message 2 of 20 , Nov 1, 2008
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        Kevin:
         
        I knew it!  I knew it!  Eyeglasses were invented in the 13th century!(grin)
        Anne G


         

        Ok, so let’s assume that anachronisms do not follow in the wake of a wizard travelling backwards through time. This is what Wikipedia has to say about the invention of telescopes and eyeglasses.

        History of the telescope

        From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

        The earliest known working telescopes appeared in 1608 and are credited to Hans Lippershey and Zacharias Janssen, spectacle-makers in Middelburg, and Jacob Metius of Alkmaar. The design of these early refracting telescopes consisted of a convex objective lens and a concave eyepiece. Galileo greatly improved upon this design the following year. In 1611, Johannes Kepler described how a telescope could be made with a convex objective and eyepiece lens and by 1655 astronomers such as Christiaan Huygens were building powerful but extremely large and unwieldy Keplerian telescopes with compound eyepieces.

        Invention of eyeglasses

        Around 1284 in Italy , Salvino D'Armate is credited with inventing the first wearable eye glasses.[7] The earliest pictorial evidence for the use of eyeglasses, however, is Tomaso da Modena's 1352 portrait of the cardinal Hugh de Provence reading in a scriptorium. Another early example would be a depiction of eyeglasses found north of the Alpes in an altarpiece of the church of Bad Wildungen, Germany, in 1403.
        Many theories abound for who should be credited for the invention of traditional eyeglasses. In 1676, Francesco Redi, a professor of medicine at the University of Pisa, wrote that he possessed a 1289 manuscript whose author complains that he would be unable to read or write were it not for the recent invention of glasses. He also produced a record of a sermon given in 1305, in which the speaker, a Dominican monk named Fra Giordano da Rivalto, remarked that glasses had been invented less than twenty years previously, and that he had met the inventor. Based on this evidence, Redi credited another Dominican monk, Fra Alessandro da Spina of Pisa , with the re-invention of glasses after their original inventor kept them a secret, a claim contained in da Spina's obituary record.[8]

        Other stories, possibly legendary, credit Roger Bacon with the invention. Bacon is known to have made one of the first recorded references to the magnifying properties of lenses in 1262,[9] though this was predated by Alhazen's Book of Optics in 1021.[3] Bacon's treatise De iride ("On the Rainbow"), which was written while he was a student of Robert Grosseteste, no later than 1235, mentions using optics to "read the smallest letters at incredible distances". While the exact date and inventor may be forever disputed, it is almost certainly clear that spectacles were invented between 1280 and 1300 in Italy.[1]
         
        These early spectacles had convex lenses that could correct both hyperopia (farsightedness) , and the presbyopia that commonly develops as a symptom of aging. Nicholas of Cusa is believed to have discovered the benefits of concave lens in the treatment of myopia (nearsightedness) . However, it was not until 1604 that Johannes Kepler published in his treatise on optics and astronomy, the first correct explanation as to why convex and concave lenses could correct presbyopia and myopia.

         


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      • Anne Gilbert
        Stephen: Well, Merlin was supposed to be a wizard. . . . Anne G Good information here. Incidentally, the legend of Arthur and Merlin is usually assigned to the
        Message 3 of 20 , Nov 1, 2008
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          Stephen:
           
          Well, Merlin was supposed to be a wizard. . . .
          Anne G

          Good information here.

          Incidentally, the legend of Arthur and Merlin is usually assigned to
          the FIFTH century, shortly after the end of Roman rule in England and
          just before Cerdic arrived.

          Will they be using mobile 'phones this week?

          .

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