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Re: The Saxons

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  • Stephen Lark
    The message was OK on the list but when I tried to read it in full it wasn t there. Then I replied and it was all in my reply. Problem solved. Now I can see
    Message 1 of 16 , Aug 1 2:17 AM
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      The message was OK on the list but when I tried to read it in full
      it wasn't there. Then I replied and it was all in my reply. Problem
      solved.

      Now I can see your conclusion, I tend to agree. {There is an old
      joke about the Irish being descended from ancient Britons who could
      swim and the Welsh from those who couldn't}. There has been some DNA
      analysis on the subject and some of us are descended from pre-Roman
      Britons whilst some are not.

      --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Anne Gilbert" <avgilbert@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Stephen:
      >
      > I was wondering about that. You see, I had some weird problems
      with my e-mail because somebody on another list sent something in
      some funny way that ordinary e-mail can't apparently process. So
      when I replied to that person, it asked me whether I wanted to send
      it in unicode, as is, or something else. I can't remember now what
      I asked it to do, but whatever it was, it messed up all my e-mail
      for a while. I guess you got part of the brunt of it. I had to take
      some time to repair the whole system, and at one point I was listed
      as Anne Gilbert4. Don't even ask why!
      > Anne G
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Stephen Lark
      > To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2008 3:53 PM
      > Subject: [sceptredisle] Re: The Saxons
      >
      >
      > Your original answer came out as three weird symbols: 
      >
      > --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Anne Gilbert" <avgilbert@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > STephen:
      > >
      > > What do you mean by "this message isn't always fully
      displayed"?
      > > Anne G
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: Stephen Lark
      > > To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2008 12:30 AM
      > > Subject: [sceptredisle] Re: The Saxons
      > >
      > >
      > > This message isn't always fully displayed!
      > >
      > > --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Anne Gilbert"
      <avgilbert@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Michael:
      > > >
      > > > I don't think there is any "consensus" at the present time.
      > There
      > > does seem to be some idea that the population of the UK(the
      > English,
      > > Scots, and possibly the Welsh), are most similar to other NW
      > > European people, genetically speaking. And then there are
      people
      > > who keep turning up "Viking" genes in the population. But then
      > > there are the "Celticists". . . .the argument keeps going on,
      as
      > to
      > > what "happened" to the "Brition" population.
      > > > Anne G
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Queion: What is the current consensus about the fate of the
      > > British population under the early Saxons/ Were the wiped out,
      > > forced to flee to the West, or survived under Saxon rule?
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > .
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Kevin O'Malley
      I always thought the theories on where where people s in various lands came from interesting. I ve read that, in the case of Ireland, the appearences that are
      Message 2 of 16 , Aug 1 6:37 AM
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        I always thought the theories on where where people's in various lands came from interesting. I've read that, in the case of Ireland, the appearences that are today considered physical attributes such as red hair, freckles, come down the very early bronze age inhabitants, while many of the cultural aspects such as the language and music, etc. come from the celtic settlers into that region at about the 5th century BC.
         
        In the case of Great Britain, I've been told by teachers a while back that the "Beakers" was a name for very early peoples there, but have not seen their name in any books I've read about early Britain.
         
        Kevin 
         


        "I can only say that I am a poor sinner, trusting in Christ alone for salvation"
        -General Robert E. Lee, 1864


        --- On Fri, 8/1/08, Stephen Lark <stephenmlark@...> wrote:
        From: Stephen Lark <stephenmlark@...>
        Subject: [sceptredisle] Re: The Saxons
        To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, August 1, 2008, 5:17 AM

        The message was OK on the list but when I tried to read it in full 
        it wasn't there. Then I replied and it was all in my reply. Problem 
        solved.
        
        Now I can see your conclusion, I tend to agree. {There is an old 
        joke about the Irish being descended from ancient Britons who could 
        swim and the Welsh from those who couldn't}. There has been some DNA 
        analysis on the subject and some of us are descended from pre-Roman 
        Britons whilst some are not.
        
        --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Anne Gilbert"
        <avgilbert@...> 
        wrote:
        >
        > Stephen:
        > 
        > I was wondering about that.  You see, I had some weird problems 
        with my e-mail because somebody on another list sent something in 
        some funny way that ordinary e-mail can't apparently process.  So 
        when I replied to that person, it asked me whether I wanted to send 
        it in unicode, as is, or something else.  I can't remember now what 
        I asked it to do, but whatever it was, it messed up all my e-mail 
        for a while. I guess you got part of the brunt of it.  I had to take 
        some time to repair the whole system, and at one point I was listed 
        as Anne Gilbert4.  Don't even ask why!
        > Anne G
        >   ----- Original Message ----- 
        >   From: Stephen Lark 
        >   To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com 
        >   Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2008 3:53 PM
        >   Subject: [sceptredisle] Re: The Saxons
        > 
        > 
        >   Your original answer came out as three weird symbols:  
        > 
        >   --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Anne Gilbert"
        <avgilbert@> 
        >   wrote:
        >   >
        >   > STephen:
        >   > 
        >   > What do you mean by "this message isn't always fully 
        displayed"?
        >   > Anne G
        >   > ----- Original Message ----- 
        >   > From: Stephen Lark 
        >   > To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com 
        >   > Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2008 12:30 AM
        >   > Subject: [sceptredisle] Re: The Saxons
        >   > 
        >   > 
        >   > This message isn't always fully displayed!
        >   > 
        >   > --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Anne Gilbert" 
        <avgilbert@> 
        >   > wrote:
        >   > >
        >   > > Michael:
        >   > > 
        >   > > I don't think there is any "consensus" at the
        present time. 
        >   There 
        >   > does seem to be some idea that the population of the UK(the 
        >   English, 
        >   > Scots, and possibly the Welsh), are most similar to other NW 
        >   > European people, genetically speaking. And then there are 
        people 
        >   > who keep turning up "Viking" genes in the population. But
        then 
        >   > there are the "Celticists". . . .the argument keeps going
        on, 
        as 
        >   to 
        >   > what "happened" to the "Brition" population.
        >   > > Anne G
        >   > > 
        >   > > 
        >   > > Queion: What is the current consensus about the fate of the 
        >   > British population under the early Saxons/ Were the wiped out, 
        >   > forced to flee to the West, or survived under Saxon rule?
        >   > > 
        >   > > 
        >   > > .
        >   > >
        >   >
        >
        
        
        
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      • S.Kevin Wojtaszek
        Hey~ I found this in an ABC article on the worls d oldest jokes. http://www.abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=5487495 The oldest British joke dates back
        Message 3 of 16 , Aug 1 7:24 AM
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          Hey~
           
          I found this in an ABC article on the worls'd oldest jokes.
           
          http://www.abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=5487495

          The oldest British joke dates back to the 10th Century and reveals the bawdy face of the Anglo-Saxons -- "What hangs at a man's thigh and wants to poke the hole that it's often poked before? Answer: A key."
           
          Anybody know any more?
           
          ~S. Kevin
           
          (I'll post something about King Offa tonight.)


          Stay in touch when you're away with Windows Live Messenger. IM anytime you're online.
        • Anne Gilbert
          Kevin: There were actually Beaker people or Bell Beaker people in Britain at one time. But if I remember my archaeology and anthropology courses at
          Message 4 of 16 , Aug 1 12:05 PM
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            Kevin:
             
            There were actually "Beaker people" or "Bell Beaker people" in Britain at one time.  But if I remember my archaeology and anthropology courses at all(they were a long time ago, I must admit), they were all over Europe.
            Anne g
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Friday, August 01, 2008 6:37 AM
            Subject: Re: [sceptredisle] Re: The Saxons


            .

          • Anne Gilbert
            Kevin: The Anglo-Saxons had a lot of jokes like that. I have a little collection of them, though they re probably not as old(or maybe they are,but were written
            Message 5 of 16 , Aug 1 12:12 PM
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              Kevin:
               
              The Anglo-Saxons had a lot of jokes like that. I have a little collection of them, though they're probably not as old(or maybe they are,but were written down later).  Here's one
               
              "I have learned that something grows in the corner,
               swells and expands, has a covering;
               on that boneless thing a woman grasps
               around with hands, with a garment
               the lord's daughter covered the swollen thing"
               
              ANSWER:  Bread rising
               
              There are other, um, interesting, riddles like that, all Anglo-Saxon in origin.
              Anne G
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, August 01, 2008 7:24 AM
              Subject: [sceptredisle] The Saxons' joke

              Hey~
               
              I found this in an ABC article on the worls'd oldest jokes.
               
              http://www.abcnews. go.com/Technolog y/wireStory? id=5487495

              The oldest British joke dates back to the 10th Century and reveals the bawdy face of the Anglo-Saxons -- "What hangs at a man's thigh and wants to poke the hole that it's often poked before? Answer: A key."
               
              Anybody know any more?
               
              ~S. Kevin
               
              (I'll post something about King Offa tonight.)


              Stay in touch when you're away with Windows Live Messenger. IM anytime you're online.

            • Stephen Lark
              From about 2000 BC a new people began to arrive from Eastern Europe. They were the Beaker Folk, whose name comes from the drinking vessels that they buried
              Message 6 of 16 , Aug 3 11:13 AM
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                "From about 2000 BC a new people began to arrive from Eastern
                Europe. They were the Beaker Folk, whose name comes from the
                drinking vessels that they buried with their dead."

                From "The Story of Britain: Before the Norman Conquest" (RJ Unstead
                p.16)

                --- In sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com, "Anne Gilbert" <avgilbert@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Kevin:
                >
                > There were actually "Beaker people" or "Bell Beaker people" in
                Britain at one time. But if I remember my archaeology and
                anthropology courses at all(they were a long time ago, I must
                admit), they were all over Europe.
                > Anne g
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Kevin O'Malley
                > To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Friday, August 01, 2008 6:37 AM
                > Subject: Re: [sceptredisle] Re: The Saxons
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > .
                >
              • Caroline Jett-Donovan
                An excellent source for many of these early jokes is the Exeter Book of Riddles. Caroline
                Message 7 of 16 , Aug 4 8:11 AM
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                  An excellent source for many of these early jokes is the Exeter Book of Riddles.

                   

                  Caroline

                • Anne Gilbert
                  Caroline: And a number of the jokes in the Exeter Book are racy riddles. Anne G ... From: Caroline Jett-Donovan To: sceptredisle@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                  Message 8 of 16 , Aug 4 12:56 PM
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                    Caroline:
                     
                    And a number of the "jokes" in the Exeter Book are "racy" riddles.
                    Anne G
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Monday, August 04, 2008 8:11 AM
                    Subject: [sceptredisle] Re: The Saxons' joke

                    An excellent source for many of these early jokes is the Exeter Book of Riddles.

                    Caroline

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