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Re: [scbwi-houston] Have PB offer, need advice

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  • Janet Fox
    Congratulations, Dee! That s awesome news. I agree completely with Dotti. There are some agents (and literary lawyers, and some organizations) that will look
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 4, 2012
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      Congratulations, Dee! That's awesome news. I agree completely with Dotti.

      There are some agents (and literary lawyers, and some organizations) that will look over a contract for you. From a major house, you usually will have a boilerplate and decent contract but it doesn't hurt to have another set of eyeballs. Honest agents will not intervene or have anything to say once you sign a contract.

      My first contract was with a small house and I sold the work and signed on my own. And now wish I'd had someone at least look over the terms. Times change, and you want to have the freedom to respond.

      xo - Janet


      On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 11:31 AM, Dee <chocolatewriter@...> wrote:
       

      Hi Everyone!

      I have a basic emailed offer (just advance and royalty numbers) for one of my PB. 
      It's with a major house, but I don't have a contract in hand yet.
      I submitted my manuscript directly to the publisher, not through an agent.

      At this point, should I try to get an agent to deal with the contract?
      Is that against protocol or is that expected?

      The basic offer doesn't mention anything about e-book rights, TV rights, etc., not that such a thing would happen.

      Any knowledge about this matter or advice would be GREATLY appreciated.

      Dee 





      --
      Janet Fox
      PO Box 2524
      Livingston, MT 59047
      406-577-6982 

      Author of award-winning books for children and young adults. 
      From Speak/Penguin:
      Sirens, a YA romance and mystery set in 1925 New York 
      Forgiven, a YA romance and adventure set in 1906 San Francisco, 2012 WILLA Finalist 
      Faithful, a YA romance, mystery and adventure set in 1904 Yellowstone NP, 2011 Amelia Bloomer List
      From Free Spirit Publishing:
      Get Organized Without Losing It, self-help for kids, 2007 MIPA award-winner


    • colburnc@sbcglobal.net
      Dee, that s fantastic! I agree with everyone who s given you advice so far and concur with Janet on a major point.... I wish I d had more/better information
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 5, 2012
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        Dee, that's fantastic! I agree with everyone who's given you advice so far and concur with Janet on a major point.... I wish I'd had more/better information before I signed - starry eyed - my 1st contract. Not you must have an agent, because much of what agents do to earn their keep is find homes for manuscripts. I do wish I'd had a seasoned veteran with my best interests looking my offer over and negotiating some fine points, asking questions I'd not even considered.

        We all want publishers to make $$$. If they don't, then they can't hire us. But we don't want them to adopt our firstborn only to find we don't even have visitation rights.
        Best wishes, c:
        www.CherieColburn.com

        --- In scbwi-houston@yahoogroups.com, Dee <chocolatewriter@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Everyone!
        >
        > I have a basic emailed offer (just advance and royalty numbers) for one of my PB. 
        > It's with a major house, but I don't have a contract in hand yet.
        > I submitted my manuscript directly to the publisher, not through an agent.
        >
        > At this point, should I try to get an agent to deal with the contract?
        > Is that against protocol or is that expected?
        >
        > The basic offer doesn't mention anything about e-book rights, TV rights, etc., not that such a thing would happen.
        >
        > Any knowledge about this matter or advice would be GREATLY appreciated.
        >
        > Dee 
        >
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