Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

armor websites

Expand Messages
  • Dylan
    has anyone noticed this? I ve been looking online alot, trying to find the best price for good armor. I was thinking that perhaps the places im looking at are
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 2, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      has anyone noticed this? I've been looking online alot, trying to
      find the best price for good armor.

      I was thinking that perhaps the places im looking at are just
      resellers. Most of the sites that sell armor below $500 have a little
      story about international partners. to me that means "hi im gonna
      pretend to sell you this, and then take your order and hand it off to
      some factory in central asia.

      Im not So patriotic that I want to pay 5 times the price for a
      helm to have it american made, but I would like to at least contact
      the actual maker of the item. My problem is that no matter how hard I
      search I keep on coming up dry. I must be missing something right?
      Dylan
    • Cailin Mac Kinnach
      Hi Dylan, I d love to help! I just put together my kit, and i did it with completely north American armor. All but my breast plate were made in America, the
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 2, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Dylan,

        I'd love to help! I just put together my kit, and i did it with completely
        north American armor. All but my breast plate were made in America, the
        breast plate I went to canada for, because I liked the work the gentleman
        did. 100% of the armorers are sca members.

        Now then, I did make my own shield, and am in the process of making a
        gorget. I've got a bevor, but I like making things.

        Let's start with what you're looking at. If you are looking at a stainless
        steel, well formed helm, 500 to 1000 dollars in not an unreasonable price,
        when you look at the amount of work that goes into them. I got my starter
        helm for 170. It's a 14 gauge mild steel Sallet-ish helm. It has a fixed
        face mask, and a articulated lobster tail. It works great! I painted it,
        and it dosen't look anything like a n00bie helm. Even so, there are
        armorers you can buy from with < $500 helms. You just have to wait for them
        to make it. What ever you get, go no lower than 14 gauge. You may know this,
        but a guy who started at the same time I did showed up with a beautiful 16
        gauge brass accented helm he got off ebay, and left with it looking about 20
        years old. They just can't take hte beating.



        The rest of your kit largely depends on your prefference. I went with
        splinted armor, since it still looks good, and isn't as heavy as full plate,
        nor as prone to armor dings. My breast plate is plastic, mostly for weight
        reduction, and cost. Though, there are some nice steel placards out there
        that can be had for very reasonable prices. I also wear a set of paldurons,
        because I'm new at this fighting thing and get hit alot. I'll probably wear
        them for war only after a while.

        I know alot of guys simply wear hockey pads under garb, with the minimum
        required steel. IF thats what you want to do, that can be really cheap
        too.

        Here are some armorers I suggest, for their reasonable pricing.

        www.renstore.com - I got my helmet here. Owned and opperated by an SCA
        Knight and Laurel, really knowelgeable, and helpful. I think they give a 10%
        discount to SCA members, though I'm not sure.

        www.stonekeep.net - I got my leg, arm, and shoulder armor from them. Great
        pricing, great turn around time, great quality stuff, from minimal, to full
        plate.

        www.ashcraftbaker.com - lowest price armory I've found yet. they have
        minimal starter kits for really good prices. We're talking a 12 gauge
        helmet, with fully articulated steel bits, plus shield basket and sword
        basket, gorget, everything you need to get on the field for $300.00.
        Everything's made in Arizona.

        http://clang.adkinssoftware.com/ - Clang armory. More expensive, but great
        value on his helms. Quite a step up from a starter helm, like what ashcraft
        and renstore sell. Ideally a second helm, once you know this is what you're
        doing, and you're really trying to get your thing down.

        I hope this helps! If you have any questions or anything, just ask!

        Cailin



        On 2/2/07, Dylan <dylan.joslin@...> wrote:
        >
        > has anyone noticed this? I've been looking online alot, trying to
        > find the best price for good armor.
        >
        > I was thinking that perhaps the places im looking at are just
        > resellers. Most of the sites that sell armor below $500 have a little
        > story about international partners. to me that means "hi im gonna
        > pretend to sell you this, and then take your order and hand it off to
        > some factory in central asia.
        >
        > Im not So patriotic that I want to pay 5 times the price for a
        > helm to have it american made, but I would like to at least contact
        > the actual maker of the item. My problem is that no matter how hard I
        > search I keep on coming up dry. I must be missing something right?
        > Dylan
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kolfinna/Col
        Hi, Dylan! Armour re-sellers are basically doing what your average department store does: buy in bulk and save . They re not farming out your order, they
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 2, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi, Dylan!

          Armour re-sellers are basically doing what your average department
          store does: 'buy in bulk and save'. They're not farming out your
          order, they simply can buy more for a better price than you could as
          an individual. Plus, they get massive discounts on shipping, which
          they then pass on to you.

          They're a good option to take until you know exactly what you want -
          the difference between ready-to-wear and tailor-made. You'll get
          something generic and then when you know what works for you you can
          get something specific.

          Most of the stuff is made in places like India or Eastern Europe -
          the quality of materials is often no different, but the labour is
          cheaper. And maybe the finish isn't as spiffy. Hence the lower
          prices. The more reputable re-sellers (where ever you are on the
          Globe) tend to know what fighters need, and communicate well with the
          manufacturers to get good stuff. Also, a lot of the manufacturers
          won't talk to you unless you are a bulk-buy business.

          I'm in Australia so we tend to rely on re-sellers - we have very few
          good armourers here, and they're *really* busy. As Cailin has shown,
          if you're in the US there's more options available. Freight is also
          less of a killer if you're on the same piece of land - shipping
          across an ocean can really mess up your budget! ;)

          Talk to people to get a feel for what they can do for you - be they
          re-sellers or not. And ask your local guys where they got their kit -
          they're often your best resource.

          Hope that clarifies things a bit!
          Kolfinna/Col :)
        • David Whitehead
          Hi Dylan, I have been fighting for five and a half years now. I just recently completed my first suit of armor. The total dollar cost was lunch and much
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 2, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Dylan, I have been fighting for five and a half years now. I
            just recently completed my first suit of armor. The total dollar cost
            was lunch and much beer. I am lucky to have a laurel as my master I
            am not his apprentance yet, haven't gotten him that drunk yet. What I
            an trying to say is that if you butter up a local armorer and ask to
            learn as you go, they may give you a discount and you will learn how
            to fix your own stuff as well. ~Wolfgang von der Eiffel

            On 2/2/07, Kolfinna/Col <quillenbone@...> wrote:
            > Hi, Dylan!
            >
            > Armour re-sellers are basically doing what your average department
            > store does: 'buy in bulk and save'. They're not farming out your
            > order, they simply can buy more for a better price than you could as
            > an individual. Plus, they get massive discounts on shipping, which
            > they then pass on to you.
            >
            > They're a good option to take until you know exactly what you want -
            > the difference between ready-to-wear and tailor-made. You'll get
            > something generic and then when you know what works for you you can
            > get something specific.
            >
            > Most of the stuff is made in places like India or Eastern Europe -
            > the quality of materials is often no different, but the labour is
            > cheaper. And maybe the finish isn't as spiffy. Hence the lower
            > prices. The more reputable re-sellers (where ever you are on the
            > Globe) tend to know what fighters need, and communicate well with the
            > manufacturers to get good stuff. Also, a lot of the manufacturers
            > won't talk to you unless you are a bulk-buy business.
            >
            > I'm in Australia so we tend to rely on re-sellers - we have very few
            > good armourers here, and they're *really* busy. As Cailin has shown,
            > if you're in the US there's more options available. Freight is also
            > less of a killer if you're on the same piece of land - shipping
            > across an ocean can really mess up your budget! ;)
            >
            > Talk to people to get a feel for what they can do for you - be they
            > re-sellers or not. And ask your local guys where they got their kit -
            > they're often your best resource.
            >
            > Hope that clarifies things a bit!
            > Kolfinna/Col :)
            >
            >
          • Cailin Mac Kinnach
            ... Quoted for Truth! As I mentioned earlier I made my own shield. Now, I m making my own gorget, out of leather with steel plating. Three months ago, I had
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 2, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              >
              > What I an trying to say is that if you butter up a local armorer and ask
              > to
              > learn as you go, they may give you a discount and you will learn how
              > to fix your own stuff as well. ~Wolfgang von der Eiffel
              >





              Quoted for Truth!

              As I mentioned earlier I made my own shield. Now, I'm making my own gorget,
              out of leather with steel
              plating. Three months ago, I had no idea how to do any of this stuff, but
              with reasonable application of
              time and effort, I've made my own shield, strapped up my leg armor, built my
              own gorget from scratch,
              done field repairs on other people's armor, and am getting ready to learn
              leather tooling. Knowing the
              maintenance stuff is invaluable.

              One thing to consider is a lamalar based armor. Ton of patterns and easy to
              follow directions out there.
              Dunno how cost effective they are though. But nothing is more satisfying
              than wearing something you made onto the field.

              Cailin


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.