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Fw: [ChivalryToday] Chivalry's Returns

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  • David Backlin
    This is a sample of the e-mails from Chivalry Today ... From: Scott Farrell To: Sent: Friday,
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 3, 2007
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      This is a sample of the e-mails from Chivalry Today


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Scott Farrell" <scott@...>
      To: <ChivalryToday@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, December 29, 2006 12:31 PM
      Subject: [ChivalryToday] Chivalry's Returns


      Generous Abuse and Chivalry’s Returns

      By Scott Farrell

      ©2006, Shining Armor Enterprises

      www.ChivalryToday.com

      Part of process of doing business by the principles and ethics of
      chivalry is establishing a sense of good faith and a reputation for
      fairness among your clientele. For retailers, one of the most common
      methods of doing this is to create a generous, “no questions asked”
      refund policy. Such a policy not only gives customers a greater
      degree of confidence, it also sends the implicit message: We trust
      our customers.

      Perhaps that’s why buyers were a bit surprised recently when a major
      on-line sports equipment retailer established an addendum to their
      otherwise unlimited refund policy. Normally this business guarantees
      its customers’ money back on any item, for any reason, but the
      retailer’s website recently announced: “Purchases made during the
      month of October will not be eligible for refunds. Items bought this
      month can be exchanged for credit only. Our standard refund policy
      will be re-implemented beginning November 1.”

      This temporary refund suspension seems odd until you read the fine
      print, which explained that the company was experiencing a high
      volume of sales to customers who were buying helmets, jerseys and
      pads to use as part of their Halloween costumes, then returning the
      goods after the holiday parties were over.

      When considering the applications of chivalrous business practices,
      customers might legitimately ask, “Is this fair?” After all, if a
      company makes an unqualified commitment to its customers, is it
      reasonable for them to suspend their “no questions asked” promise
      just because customers are applying that policy in an unanticipated
      manner? Does chivalry bind them to their guarantee even though
      they’re being taken advantage of?

      Christine de Pizan, in her 15th century book “Fais d’armes et de
      chevalerie” described an astonishingly similar situation. Her book is
      written as a sort of FAQ document about the fine points of leading a
      chivalrous life. One of her hypotheses is: If a knight provides a
      sword to a colleague and that sword is damaged or lost in battle, is
      the friend obliged to “restore” (that is, “replace or pay for”) the
      sword he’s lost? What, Christine seems to be asking, is the knightly
      return policy?

      The book's answer provides intriguing illumination regarding the
      expectations of both supplier and consumer as part of the Code of
      Chivalry. She says, “A knight who in no way deceived the other
      (person), certainly is not bound to restore the goods.”

      On the other hand, she says that if the knight “borrowed the thing
      with the intent to deceive, or under false pretenses,” then the
      obligation to replace the sword falls on the borrower.

      Christine sums up her philosophy of chivalry in this hypothetical
      case very clearly: “It is in no way right for one person to deceive
      another.”

      Fair business policies, as Christine’s writing points out, must be
      based on trust and trustworthiness alike. When a business takes
      advantage of consumers’ trust, such as overcharging or selling
      substandard merchandise, it’s considered dishonorable. Equally
      dishonorable, however, is the practice of manipulating a company’s
      policy of generosity and trust for personal benefits.

      Sadly, there will probably always be businesses that try to take
      advantage of customers just as there will always be consumers,
      clients and employees who try to twist company policies for their own
      profit — the problems that Christine de Pizan addressed in her 15th
      century writings are still undeniably present in the business world
      of the 21st century. But in any case, chivalry isn’t synonymous with
      naiveté, and generosity is no excuse for deviousness. Examining this
      “knightly return policy” demonstrates that the strongest and most
      rewarding business relationships have always been those based on
      honesty, loyalty, mutual respect and the principles of the Code of
      Chivalry in the world of commerce.

      = = = = = = = = = =
      What’s New At www.ChivalryToday.com?

      - Financial Fidelity: An article examining the cents-able side of
      honesty and trust, by investment columnist Michelle Singletary;

      - Podcast #7: Interview with Jeremy Salter, author of “The 101 Most
      Influential People Who Never Lived.”

      - New classroom presentations available for classrooms and youth
      organizations. Chivalry Today is now scheduling “knightly” bookings
      throughout 2007!

      = = = = = = = = = =
      Readers are permitted and encouraged to share this article with
      others as a way of furthering the understanding of the Code of
      Chivalry in the modern world. Scott Farrell’s seminar “Leadership
      Secrets of the Code of Chivalry” is available to businesses, athletic
      teams and civic groups throughout the Southern California area; more
      information can be found on our website. Please include all copyright
      statements and attributions when forwarding Chivalry Today articles.
      Copyright 2006 Scott Farrell and Shining Armor Enterprises. Visit our
      website at www.ChivalryToday.com .

      http://www.ChivalryToday.com/
    • Iustinos Tekton called Justin
      ... Good morning! David, this is *not* aimed at you, because the article you posted explicitly grants permission for it to be shared if the copyright notices
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 4, 2007
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        On Wednesday 03 January 2007 22:59, David Backlin wrote:
        > Generous Abuse and Chivalry’s Returns
        >
        > By Scott Farrell
        >
        > ©2006, Shining Armor Enterprises

        Good morning!

        David, this is *not* aimed at you, because the article you posted explicitly
        grants permission for it to be shared if the copyright notices are included,
        and you did so. :-)

        That being said, I wanted to take this opportunity as Moderator to gently
        remind everyone that you should not post copyrighted material to this list
        unless you are the author or you have specific permission to do so. Messages
        sent to other lists carry an implied copyright by the author, so don't forward
        things here from other lists unless you are the original author.

        Again...David did nothing wrong here, and in fact, I'm using his post as an
        example of the kind of forwarding that *is* okay, as long as it is on-topic
        for this list (which it was). What protects David is this paragraph from
        Scott Farrell's writing (excerpted):

        "Readers are permitted and encouraged to share this article with
        others as a way of furthering the understanding of the Code of
        Chivalry in the modern world. ... Please include all copyright
        statements and attributions when forwarding Chivalry Today articles.
        Copyright 2006 Scott Farrell and Shining Armor Enterprises. Visit our
        website at www.ChivalryToday.com."

        It is also permissible to quote -- with proper attribution -- small excerpts
        from elsewhere under Fair Use Doctrine.

        Sorry to bring in this bit of mundania, but it's good to remind everyone now
        and then that posting something on the Internet doesn't automatically place it
        into the public domain. Part of chivalry is to respect the copyright of others'
        creative work. :-)

        Kind regards,

        Justin

        --
        ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]xxxx()
        Maistor Iustinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
        Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two
        keys fesswise reversed sable.

        Marche of Alderford (Canton, Ohio) http://4th.com/sca/justin/
        justin@... PGP Public Key at http://4th.com/keys/justin.pubkey
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