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Hello! I have a Question about cloaks...

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  • Janette
    I am very new to the Society and hail from the Northshield kingdom. I have two army type 100% wool blankets (think greenish brown instead of green, with
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 14, 2006
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      I am very new to the Society and hail from the Northshield kingdom.
      I have two army type 100% wool blankets (think greenish brown
      instead of green, with light/off white colored stripes on the ends)
      that I think are from the German army. I keep thinking I saw
      something on making a cloak out of blankets on the internet but now
      I cannot find it!
      If anyone can help me it would be most appreciated.

      Other question related to first: Would the stripes be something un-
      period? Or could I just add trim of some sort over them-nothing
      fancy, going for the country girl look here, and make it work? The
      stripes are dyed in (or undyed, possibly) but I'd rather not mess
      with trying to dye this shade of green anything else! KWIM??

      Thank you for any help!

      Janette M.
      (hmmm. P.S. Is my French first name period? Does anyone have a
      suggested link I could look at for French names? It makes personas
      easier, besides, my dh is going with his, William or Wilhelm, and
      it's just not fair!!! LOL just kidding.)
    • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      ... I can t point you to that article, but many early-period cultures routinely used rectangular cloaks. Get a cloak pin to fasten it at the shoulder or over
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 15, 2006
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        Janette wrote:
        > I keep thinking I saw something on making a cloak out of blankets on
        > the internet but now I cannot find it!

        I can't point you to that article, but many early-period cultures
        routinely used rectangular cloaks. Get a cloak pin to fasten it at the
        shoulder or over your breastbone, and you're good to go--no sewing
        necessary. There are some good photos of such a cloak in use in a
        Norse context on the Hurstwic site
        <http://www.hurstwic.org/history/articles/daily_living/text/
        clothing.htm>. Drawings of rectangular cloaks in use and information
        on cloak pins of various kinds can be found in "Early Gaelic Dress: An
        Introduction"
        <http://b-b-fam.home.texas.net/Coblaith/EarlyGaelicDress/default.html>.

        You can buy reproduction pins from Raymond's Quiet Press
        <http://www.quietpress.com/>, the Wareham Forge
        <http://www.warehamforge.ca/norsejewel.html>, and Ragnar's Ragweed
        Forge <http://www.ragweedforge.com/pins.html>, among others.


        > Would the stripes be something un-period? Or could I just add trim of
        > some sort over them-nothing fancy, going for the country girl look
        > here, and make it work?

        "Period" is a meaningful term only if you define the period. From
        where, from when, and from what culture and class did you want your
        clothing to be? For a persona from early in the SCA timespan, at least
        in the British Isles and Scandinavia, woven-in stripes would be
        perfectly appropriate, and dyed-in stripes very plausible.

        If you've got a particular time, place, and culture in mind, and you'll
        let us know what it is, somebody may be able to give you an answer more
        tailored to your period.



        Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        Barony of Bryn Gwlad
        Kingdom of Ansteorra
        <mailto:Coblaith@...>
      • William
        Wow - I can actually help with this one instead of always asking the questions. I have yet to attend any event or meeting but have been reading and searching
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 15, 2006
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          Wow - I can actually help with this one instead of always asking the
          questions. I have yet to attend any event or meeting but have been
          reading and searching the internet including patterns.

          I don't consider myself cheap and could find a lot of patterns on-
          line to buy but if I can find it for free - why not.

          The best one I've found is at
          http://home.clara.net/arianhod/Aldebaran/DoItYourself/Cloak02.html

          It has the best directions and pictures. I did find another one that
          I think lays it out on the fabric better but it doesn't have the link
          printed at the bottom of the page.

          I've found patterns for a tunic, cloak, shirt, hose, and simple shoe
          on-line for free. It's not easy finding them and of course I
          sincerely appreciate the work of others.

          I know you can buy whatever garb you need on-line but hey maybe I am
          cheap after all and would rather build my persona including the
          clothes on my back.

          I would certainly appreciate anyone else who has better links to the
          free stuff :)

          William (yes my real name too) of Bjornsborg
          Kingdom of Ansteorra
        • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
          ... There are period variants of it. Several women named Jehannette are among those listed in 15th-century tax rolls from Paris and elsewhere in northern
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 15, 2006
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            Janette wrote:
            > Is my French first name period?

            There are period variants of it. Several women named "Jehannette" are
            among those listed in 15th-century tax rolls from Paris and elsewhere
            in northern France
            <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/paris1423.html>
            <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/latefrench.html>, for
            instance. And women called "Jannet", "Jennet", or some variation
            thereof lived in 16th-century England
            <http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/reaney/reaney.cgi?Jane> and
            Scotland
            <http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/scottishfem/
            scottishfemlate.html>.

            The Academy of St. Gabriel is an organization dedicated to helping
            individuals learn more about authentic medieval and renaissance names
            and heraldry. They are not an SCA group, but their reports are
            accepted as documentation by the College of Arms. They've issued four
            reports, #2764
            <http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?2764>, #2183
            <http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?2183>, #2132
            <http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?2132>, and
            #1696 <http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?1696>,
            which discuss "Jehannette", "Jeannette", or both. They've also done
            two reports that cover "Jennet", #2829
            <http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?2829> and #1187
            <http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?1187>.

            If you're willing to consider related names a little further from your
            mundane version, you'll have several additional options. The names
            "Jehannette" and "Jeannette" are diminutives of "Jehanne" and "Jeanne".
            (In French, "-ette" often serves the same function that "-y" and "-ie"
            sometimes serve in English; the relationship between "Jehanne" and
            "Jehannette" is analogous to that between "John" and "Johnny" or "Joan"
            and "Joanie".) "Jannet" and "Jennet" are variants of "Jane", closely
            related to "Janet". And if having some version of "Janette" as your
            name is more important than having a name that sounds like "Janette",
            you could probably find a cognate appropriate to almost any Western
            European culture, depending on the century. It ultimately derives from
            the Latin "Iohannes", via the French "Jehan", and mutations of that
            name are found almost anywhere the Normans settled or traded.

            > Does anyone have a suggested link I could look at for French names?

            The Medieval Names Archive <http://s-gabriel.org/names/> is, hands
            down, the best online source for documentable names. I suggest you
            begin with "Choosing a Society Name: Hints for Newcomers", and then
            proceed to the naming guide(s) for the culture(s) in which you're
            interested.

            By the way, the Academy of St. Gabriel is on vacation until the middle
            of January, but when they re-open, they'll be happy to help you find an
            authentic name, if you want one. Just use their webform
            <http://s-gabriel.org/gabemail.html>. But choose a culture, general
            location, and era first--the more specific you are when you ask, the
            more rapidly they'll be able to get you answers.



            Coblaith Mhuimhneach
            Barony of Bryn Gwlad
            Kingdom of Ansteorra
            <mailto:Coblaith@...>
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