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[SCA Newcomers] Re: sounding right (was: picking a persona)

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  • Stephen
    Medieval Occitan would be great. I figure if I m going to attempt to learn it, might as well learn it right as to fit the part. Thanks! ~Almaric ...
    Message 1 of 51 , Jul 21, 2006
      Medieval Occitan would be great. I figure if I'm going to attempt
      to learn it, might as well learn it "right" as to fit the part.
      Thanks!

      ~Almaric

      --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Sydney Walker Freedman"
      <freedmas@...> wrote:
      >
      > Are you more interested in Medieval or modern Occitan?
      >
      >
      > > Thank you, my Lady.....that would be wonderful. I looked on the
      > > dialect map, and Carcasonna falls within the the Occitan
      geographic
      > > domain. I would greatly appreciate it if you could send them my
      way.
      > >
      > > ~Almaric
      > >
      > > --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Sydney Walker Freedman"
      > > <freedmas@> wrote:
      > >>
      > >> I have some resourcws for learning Occitan if that's where you
      are
      > > on the
      > >> dialect map. Let me know if you want them.
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> > Lords and Ladies,
      > >> >
      > >> > Again, thank you for helping me out with the my name
      > >> > questions....I've finally settled on one. Since someone
      already
      > >> > brought up the "sounding right" topic, I figured I'd continue
      > > this
      > >> > line of thought to another to a follow-on question concerning
      my
      > >> > persona. In 13th/14th Century Languedoc....would the language
      > > still
      > >> > be predominantly Provencal? If yes, where might I find
      > > resources in
      > >> > learning the language?
      > >> >
      > >> > ~Almaric
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >> > -- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Sydney Walker Freedman"
      > >> > <freedmas@> wrote:
      > >> >>
      > >> >> :) Well, if you want him to take diction classes, just let
      me
      > >> > know. :)
      > >> >>
      > >> >>
      > >> >> > Thank you! I think I will be able to manage, the hard part
      > > will
      > >> > be
      > >> >> > de-rednecking my husbadn! :)
      > >> >> >
      > >> >> >
      > >> >> > --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      > >> >> > <Coblaith@> wrote:
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> Jeffs, etc. wrote:
      > >> >> >> > Many people who put a lot of time and effort getting
      > >> > the "look"
      > >> >> > right
      > >> >> >> > often forget about getting the "sound" right.. . .
      > >> >> >> >
      > >> >> >> > And I don't mean "speaking forsoothly." I suspect that
      > >> >> > if "medievals"
      > >> >> >> > were an ethnic group, "speaking forsoothly" would be as
      > >> >> > politically
      > >> >> >> > correct as Buckwheat or Speedy Gonzales.. . .
      > >> >> >> >
      > >> >> >> > . . .there's a very common, two-syllable word that
      creeps
      > > into
      > >> >> >> > everyday language but is totally out of period.
      > >> > It's "OK.". . .
      > >> >> >> >
      > >> >> >> > . . .a few words and phrases in your persona's native
      > > language
      > >> >> > can
      > >> >> >> > really add to the event: instead of the generic "Pardon
      > >> >> > m'lord",
      > >> >> >> > throw in "Scusi, senore..." (This is actually most
      > > difficult
      > >> > if
      > >> >> > your
      > >> >> >> > persona's language is English...though in some periods,
      I
      > >> >> > suspect a
      > >> >> >> > few, horribly mangled French phrases would be
      > > appropriate...;-
      > >> > )
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> Lady Cecilia de Cambrige commented:
      > >> >> >> > I would find it wonderful if I never had to. . .listen
      to a
      > >> >> >> > conversation where "cool" and "okay" are frequently
      used...
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> Tiffany asked:
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> > Have you any advice for learning proper speech
      patterns? I
      > >> > fear
      > >> >> >> > embarassment!
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> Don't worry about being embarrassed. Lots of people
      speak at
      > >> >> > events
      > >> >> >> just as they do at home. Nobody's going to judge you for
      it.
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> If you do want to distinguish your speech at events, you
      > > don't
      > >> >> > have to
      > >> >> >> go to extremes. Formal modern speech is enough to make
      most
      > >> >> > Americans,
      > >> >> >> at least, feel more like they're surrounded by "lords and
      > >> > ladies",
      > >> >> > and
      > >> >> >> isn't hard to achieve with a bit of practice. Forget
      about
      > >> >> >> contractions, don't use similes and metaphors with mundane
      > >> >> > elements,
      > >> >> >> and avoid colloquialisms.
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> For example, you might on an average day hear a
      conversation
      > >> > like:
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> "Hey, Rose! How are you doin' t'day?"
      > >> >> >> "Oh, hi, Jane. I'm O.K. My dogs are barkin', though;
      I've
      > > been
      > >> >> > out
      > >> >> >> runnin' around all day."
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> The same conversation, more formally, might go:
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> "Why, hello, Rose! How are you today?"
      > >> >> >> "Hello, Jane. I am well, thank you. I do need a rest,
      > > however;
      > >> >> > it has
      > >> >> >> been a busy day."
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> The latter isn't really any more medieval than the former,
      > > but,
      > >> >> > because
      > >> >> >> we rarely speak so, it sounds "special" to us, and that's
      > > enough
      > >> >> > to
      > >> >> >> make the conversation not "jarringly modern" to the
      typical
      > >> >> > SCAdian
      > >> >> >> ear.
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> There're annotated links to some sites that might help if
      you
      > >> > want
      > >> >> > to
      > >> >> >> go further, including some on "speaking forsoothly" and
      > >> >> > Elizabethan and
      > >> >> >> Anglo-Saxon terms you can use to "season" your speech if
      your
      > >> >> > persona
      > >> >> >> speaks English, at <http://scatoday.net/node/4794>.
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >> Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      > >> >> >> Barony of Bryn Gwlad
      > >> >> >> Kingdom of Ansteorra
      > >> >> >> <mailto:coblaith@>
      > >> >> >>
      > >> >> >
      > >> >> >
      > >> >> >
      > >> >> >
      > >> >> >
      > >> >>
      > >> >>
      > >> >> Pax Christi,
      > >> >> Sydney
      > >> >>
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> Pax Christi,
      > >> Sydney
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > Pax Christi,
      > Sydney
      >
    • Stephen
      Medieval Occitan would be great. I figure if I m going to attempt to learn it, might as well learn it right as to fit the part. Thanks! ~Almaric ...
      Message 51 of 51 , Jul 21, 2006
        Medieval Occitan would be great. I figure if I'm going to attempt
        to learn it, might as well learn it "right" as to fit the part.
        Thanks!

        ~Almaric

        --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Sydney Walker Freedman"
        <freedmas@...> wrote:
        >
        > Are you more interested in Medieval or modern Occitan?
        >
        >
        > > Thank you, my Lady.....that would be wonderful. I looked on the
        > > dialect map, and Carcasonna falls within the the Occitan
        geographic
        > > domain. I would greatly appreciate it if you could send them my
        way.
        > >
        > > ~Almaric
        > >
        > > --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Sydney Walker Freedman"
        > > <freedmas@> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> I have some resourcws for learning Occitan if that's where you
        are
        > > on the
        > >> dialect map. Let me know if you want them.
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> > Lords and Ladies,
        > >> >
        > >> > Again, thank you for helping me out with the my name
        > >> > questions....I've finally settled on one. Since someone
        already
        > >> > brought up the "sounding right" topic, I figured I'd continue
        > > this
        > >> > line of thought to another to a follow-on question concerning
        my
        > >> > persona. In 13th/14th Century Languedoc....would the language
        > > still
        > >> > be predominantly Provencal? If yes, where might I find
        > > resources in
        > >> > learning the language?
        > >> >
        > >> > ~Almaric
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >> > -- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Sydney Walker Freedman"
        > >> > <freedmas@> wrote:
        > >> >>
        > >> >> :) Well, if you want him to take diction classes, just let
        me
        > >> > know. :)
        > >> >>
        > >> >>
        > >> >> > Thank you! I think I will be able to manage, the hard part
        > > will
        > >> > be
        > >> >> > de-rednecking my husbadn! :)
        > >> >> >
        > >> >> >
        > >> >> > --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        > >> >> > <Coblaith@> wrote:
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> Jeffs, etc. wrote:
        > >> >> >> > Many people who put a lot of time and effort getting
        > >> > the "look"
        > >> >> > right
        > >> >> >> > often forget about getting the "sound" right.. . .
        > >> >> >> >
        > >> >> >> > And I don't mean "speaking forsoothly." I suspect that
        > >> >> > if "medievals"
        > >> >> >> > were an ethnic group, "speaking forsoothly" would be as
        > >> >> > politically
        > >> >> >> > correct as Buckwheat or Speedy Gonzales.. . .
        > >> >> >> >
        > >> >> >> > . . .there's a very common, two-syllable word that
        creeps
        > > into
        > >> >> >> > everyday language but is totally out of period.
        > >> > It's "OK.". . .
        > >> >> >> >
        > >> >> >> > . . .a few words and phrases in your persona's native
        > > language
        > >> >> > can
        > >> >> >> > really add to the event: instead of the generic "Pardon
        > >> >> > m'lord",
        > >> >> >> > throw in "Scusi, senore..." (This is actually most
        > > difficult
        > >> > if
        > >> >> > your
        > >> >> >> > persona's language is English...though in some periods,
        I
        > >> >> > suspect a
        > >> >> >> > few, horribly mangled French phrases would be
        > > appropriate...;-
        > >> > )
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> Lady Cecilia de Cambrige commented:
        > >> >> >> > I would find it wonderful if I never had to. . .listen
        to a
        > >> >> >> > conversation where "cool" and "okay" are frequently
        used...
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> Tiffany asked:
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> > Have you any advice for learning proper speech
        patterns? I
        > >> > fear
        > >> >> >> > embarassment!
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> Don't worry about being embarrassed. Lots of people
        speak at
        > >> >> > events
        > >> >> >> just as they do at home. Nobody's going to judge you for
        it.
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> If you do want to distinguish your speech at events, you
        > > don't
        > >> >> > have to
        > >> >> >> go to extremes. Formal modern speech is enough to make
        most
        > >> >> > Americans,
        > >> >> >> at least, feel more like they're surrounded by "lords and
        > >> > ladies",
        > >> >> > and
        > >> >> >> isn't hard to achieve with a bit of practice. Forget
        about
        > >> >> >> contractions, don't use similes and metaphors with mundane
        > >> >> > elements,
        > >> >> >> and avoid colloquialisms.
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> For example, you might on an average day hear a
        conversation
        > >> > like:
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> "Hey, Rose! How are you doin' t'day?"
        > >> >> >> "Oh, hi, Jane. I'm O.K. My dogs are barkin', though;
        I've
        > > been
        > >> >> > out
        > >> >> >> runnin' around all day."
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> The same conversation, more formally, might go:
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> "Why, hello, Rose! How are you today?"
        > >> >> >> "Hello, Jane. I am well, thank you. I do need a rest,
        > > however;
        > >> >> > it has
        > >> >> >> been a busy day."
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> The latter isn't really any more medieval than the former,
        > > but,
        > >> >> > because
        > >> >> >> we rarely speak so, it sounds "special" to us, and that's
        > > enough
        > >> >> > to
        > >> >> >> make the conversation not "jarringly modern" to the
        typical
        > >> >> > SCAdian
        > >> >> >> ear.
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> There're annotated links to some sites that might help if
        you
        > >> > want
        > >> >> > to
        > >> >> >> go further, including some on "speaking forsoothly" and
        > >> >> > Elizabethan and
        > >> >> >> Anglo-Saxon terms you can use to "season" your speech if
        your
        > >> >> > persona
        > >> >> >> speaks English, at <http://scatoday.net/node/4794>.
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >> Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        > >> >> >> Barony of Bryn Gwlad
        > >> >> >> Kingdom of Ansteorra
        > >> >> >> <mailto:coblaith@>
        > >> >> >>
        > >> >> >
        > >> >> >
        > >> >> >
        > >> >> >
        > >> >> >
        > >> >>
        > >> >>
        > >> >> Pax Christi,
        > >> >> Sydney
        > >> >>
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> Pax Christi,
        > >> Sydney
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > Pax Christi,
        > Sydney
        >
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