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RE: Garb question

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  • rebeccaatthewell_2000
    Thanks everyone. It is hard reorienting yourself from ren faire thinkging to SCA thinking :) but I shall attempt it, and I won t be making my own clothing
    Message 1 of 28 , Mar 15, 2006
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      Thanks everyone. It is hard reorienting yourself from ren faire
      thinkging to SCA thinking :) but I shall attempt it, and I won't be
      making my own clothing lol, I shall have someone else make it because I
      am not domestically inclined :D

      the things that interest me are:
      Drawing
      Poetry (writing and reciting)
      Archery!!
      music (both vocal and instrumental)
      Bardic recitations

      and I have a feeling each one of them could be a full time job if I
      allowed to. :)

      Thanks for the encouragement
      Isabella (Rebecca)
    • bronwynmgn@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/15/2006 6:41:20 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
      Message 2 of 28 , Mar 15, 2006
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        In a message dated 3/15/2006 6:41:20 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
        scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:

        <<and women doing anything is not really period either
        but I am not much for following such things (me and
        Joan of Arc, of course she came to a bad end, soooo
        lol)>>

        Your garb question has been pretty well addressed by now (and yes, I'm the
        Brangwayna that Justin mentioned), so I'll leave that bit unless you would like
        info on accurate materials, clothing designs, and so forth.

        I did want to hit this second point, though. I think, as you learn more
        about medieval life, you'll find that the "women weren't allowed to do anything"
        bit is pretty much a modern misconception or even an outright myth. Pretty
        much throughout the SCA period, at least in the Western European cultures I'm
        most familiar with, women had quite a few more career avenues available than
        choosing between being a wife and mother or a nun.
        Just a few examples - smithing, bell-founding (there is an existing bell on
        which the maker's name, Johanna, appears), a number of careers in the textile
        and food industries including women who owned their own businesses and took
        apprentices. In the leisure areas, too, there is plenty of evidence for
        women hunting with both bows and hawks, and participating in active games and
        sports. There is even evidence for women directing troops to protect the
        castles where they lived while their husbands were away.


        Brangwayna Morgan
        Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
        Lancaster, PA


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jeff Suzuki
        ... Besides those occupations already listed, it s worth noting that in many areas, among certain classes, women were more likely to be literate and numerate,
        Message 3 of 28 , Mar 16, 2006
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          --- bronwynmgn@... wrote:

          > I did want to hit this second point, though. I
          > think, as you learn more
          > about medieval life, you'll find that the "women
          > weren't allowed to do anything"
          > bit is pretty much a modern misconception or even an
          > outright myth.

          Besides those occupations already listed, it's worth
          noting that in many areas, among certain classes,
          women were more likely to be literate and numerate,
          since keeping track of the household accounts was
          "women's work."

          And once you control the books...

          Jeffs/etc.

          Jeffs/etc.

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        • Iustinos Tekton called Justin
          ... In addition to what Brangwayna has said, I should also mention that in the SCA we create the *current middle ages*, not the *historical middle ages*. In
          Message 4 of 28 , Apr 10 7:07 PM
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            On Wednesday 15 March 2006 18:39, bronwynmgn@... wrote:
            > Pretty
            > much throughout the SCA period, at least in the Western  European cultures I'm
            > most familiar with, women had quite a few more career  avenues available than
            > choosing between being a wife and mother or a nun.

            In addition to what Brangwayna has said, I should also mention that in the SCA
            we create the *current middle ages*, not the *historical middle ages*. In
            short terms, that means when it comes to things like gender roles, we do "the
            middle ages as we wish they had been." So I can (and do) sew and cook, and
            many women can (and do) fight and make armor and so on. It's great that there
            *are* historical precedents for things like this, as Brangwayna cites, but also
            it's great that in the SCA you can participate in any activity you wish without
            having to prove that your gender could have done so in period.

            Again, not to disagree with what Brangwayna said about the historical facts,
            just adding the SCA-specific spin as an extra bit of info. :-)

            Justin

            --
            ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]xxxx()
            Maistor Iustinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
            Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two
            keys fesswise reversed sable.

            Marche of Alderford (Canton, Ohio) http://4th.com/sca/justin/
            justin@... PGP Public Key at http://4th.com/keys/justin.pubkey
          • Sydney Walker Freedman
            There are some who are attracted to the SCA and medieval studies partially because of the traditional gender roles. (Ahem, maybe not that many...) Sorry. I
            Message 5 of 28 , Apr 10 7:49 PM
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              There are some who are attracted to the SCA and medieval studies partially
              because of the traditional gender roles. (Ahem, maybe not that many...)
              Sorry. I just really enjoy sitting at my loom and singing chansons de
              toile. Also, it's a good thing I don't fight; I don't need a sword. I'm
              scary enough as it is with a cane. :)

              Pax Christi,
              Cecilia

              > On Wednesday 15 March 2006 18:39, bronwynmgn@... wrote:
              > > Pretty
              > > much throughout the SCA period, at least in the Western  European
              > cultures I'm
              > > most familiar with, women had quite a few more career  avenues
              > available than
              > > choosing between being a wife and mother or a nun.
              >
              > In addition to what Brangwayna has said, I should also mention that in
              > the SCA
              > we create the *current middle ages*, not the *historical middle ages*. In
              > short terms, that means when it comes to things like gender roles, we do
              > "the
              > middle ages as we wish they had been." So I can (and do) sew and
              > cook, and
              > many women can (and do) fight and make armor and so on. It's great that
              > there
              > *are* historical precedents for things like this, as Brangwayna cites,
              > but also
              > it's great that in the SCA you can participate in any activity you wish
              > without
              > having to prove that your gender could have done so in period.
              >
              > Again, not to disagree with what Brangwayna said about the historical
              > facts,
              > just adding the SCA-specific spin as an extra bit of info. :-)
              >
              > Justin
              >
              > --
              > ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> http://4th.com/sca/justin/
              > justin@... PGP Public Key at http://4th.com/keys/justin.pubkey
              >
              > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
              > Visit your group "scanewcomers" on the web.
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
              >


              Pax Christi,
              Sydney
            • Iustinos Tekton called Justin
              ... And that s okay, too. Just because you *can* cross traditional gender roles doesn t mean that you *must*. :-) Justin -- ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::
              Message 6 of 28 , Apr 10 8:35 PM
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                On Monday 10 April 2006 22:49, Sydney Walker Freedman wrote:
                > There are some who are attracted to the SCA and medieval studies partially
                > because of the traditional gender roles.

                And that's okay, too. Just because you *can* cross traditional gender roles
                doesn't mean that you *must*. :-)

                Justin

                --
                ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]xxxx()
                Maistor Iustinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
                Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two
                keys fesswise reversed sable.

                Marche of Alderford (Canton, Ohio) http://4th.com/sca/justin/
                justin@... PGP Public Key at http://4th.com/keys/justin.pubkey
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