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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Title question

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  • Iustinos Tekton called Justin
    ... You are still presumed to be of gentry class, and of a noble lineage even though you yourself have not yet been given a title by Their Majesties. Thus, you
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 12, 2005
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      On Monday 10 October 2005 09:11, Dawn Perez wrote:
      > I understand the titles of folks who have them, but what about us
      > common folk?  For instance, I am still new, but I am almost sure that
      > I should call myself by something.  My name is Albina Gherardi, and I
      > am a widowed lady about to be remarried.  What would a married lady be
      > called, that is not a noble or does not yet have an AoA?

      You are still presumed to be of gentry class, and of a noble lineage even
      though you yourself have not yet been given a title by Their Majesties.
      Thus, you are "a lady" even if you are not yet "Lady".

      The courtesy title of M'Lady (short for "My Lady") is proper for any woman
      in the SCA, regardless of her award or title, so you can be addressed as
      "M'Lady Albina" or (more formally) "M'Lady Albina Gherardi".

      In many kingdoms, the titles Lord and Lady are used as "courtesy titles"
      like "Mr." and "Ms." in the modern world, a simple way to identify gender
      without necessarily conveying status. You'll see this in places where the
      context is more modern-world, such as an informal email to shire members
      listing who's coming to fighter practice this weekend -- in other words,
      the exact titles aren't that important in such a context, so if you can't
      remember them, you use "Lord" and "Lady" by default. This varies from
      kingdom to kingdom.

      In most kingdoms, you can at whatever title level you hold pick a translated
      version of your title into your persona's native language. Your local Herald
      or Pursuivant can advise you on this. In my case, for example, I am entitled
      to the title of "Master of the Pelican" but have chosen to use the Greek
      title "Maistor", which in my persona's time period translated idiomatically as
      "Professor". The spelling resemblence to "Master" is actually coincidental --
      the Greek word that literally translates as "Master" looks nothing like the
      English word, and in my persona's period it meant "magistrate" or "judge".
      I felt this meaning was too presumptuous, because I have no such authority,
      and was pleased when a word that meant "guildmaster" or "professor" happened
      to look a lot like the usual Pelican title so it would be easy to say and
      to remember. Sometimes we luck out! :-)

      If you choose a French persona, you may find that "Madame" or "Madamoiselle"
      is acceptable as a substitute for "M'Lady" in your kingdom, for example.
      In a German persona, perhaps you could use "Frau" or "Frauline". Again,
      check with your local Herald or Pursuivant.

      I'm pretty sure (someone correct me if I'm wrong), though, that "M'Lord"
      and "M'Lady" are used universally for those who don't yet have an AoA or
      when the proper title is unknown to the speaker, and across multiple
      persona cultures. :-)

      Justin

      --
      ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]xxxx()
      Maistor Iustinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
      Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two
      keys fesswise reversed sable.

      Marche of Alderford (Canton, Ohio) http://4th.com/sca/justin/
      justin@... PGP Public Key at http://4th.com/keys/justin.pubkey
    • Dawn Perez
      So, for my Italian persona, I could be Signora Albina? And my husband to be (only in the SCA, we have been married for quite a while, but will have an SCA
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 12, 2005
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        So, for my Italian persona, I could be Signora Albina? And my
        husband to be (only in the SCA, we have been married for quite a
        while, but will have an SCA ceremony next year!) would be Senor
        Estevan? Would that be proper? I only ask, because as a good
        southern lady, mundanely, I always send thank you cards and
        invitations labeled with our names.

        As a herald, would this fly?

        Albina


        > If you choose a French persona, you may find that "Madame"
        or "Madamoiselle"
        > is acceptable as a substitute for "M'Lady" in your kingdom, for
        example.
        > In a German persona, perhaps you could use "Frau" or "Frauline".
        Again,
        > check with your local Herald or Pursuivant.
        >
        > I'm pretty sure (someone correct me if I'm wrong), though,
        that "M'Lord"
        > and "M'Lady" are used universally for those who don't yet have an
        AoA or
        > when the proper title is unknown to the speaker, and across
        multiple
        > persona cultures. :-)
        >
        > Justin
        >
        > --
        > ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]
        xxxx()
        > Maistor Iustinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
        > Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two
        > keys fesswise reversed sable.
        >
        > Marche of Alderford (Canton, Ohio)
        http://4th.com/sca/justin/
        > justin@4... PGP Public Key at
        http://4th.com/keys/justin.pubkey
        >
      • Jeremy J. Slick
        ... I would suggest against using signore and signora until you have received your Award of Arms...as these are the Society College of Heralds regonized
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 13, 2005
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          --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Dawn Perez" <dagperez@y...> wrote:
          >
          > So, for my Italian persona, I could be Signora Albina? And my
          > husband to be (only in the SCA, we have been married for quite a
          > while, but will have an SCA ceremony next year!) would be Senor
          > Estevan? Would that be proper? I only ask, because as a good
          > southern lady, mundanely, I always send thank you cards and
          > invitations labeled with our names.
          >
          > As a herald, would this fly?
          >
          > Albina


          I would suggest against using "signore" and "signora" until you have
          received your Award of Arms...as these are the Society College of
          Heralds regonized alternate titles for Lord and Lady (which one uses
          once they have received their AoA or requivalent). I'm still
          researching for alternate terms appropriate for Italian personas...but
          so far I'm not getting very far....

          Signore Giudo di Niccolo Brunelleschi, CT
          Shire of Deodar, Kingdom of Calontir
          Deodar Pursuivant
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