Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA Newcomers] dutch ovens?

Expand Messages
  • Iustinos Tekton called Justin
    ... I did a bit more digging into this (my curiosity being fully piqued now...) and found this reference: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/jselmer/cauldrons.htm
    Message 1 of 7 , May 17, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      On Monday 16 May 2005 19:14, bronwynmgn@... wrote:
      > Cast iron itself isn't period.  But there were similar cooking  techniques
      > using metal pots hammered out and rivetted together, as well as  ceramics, so a
      > modern dutch oven is a good substitute.  As long as you  aren't using it at a
      > demo and telling people that cast iron dutch ovens were  used in the middle
      > ages, go ahead and use one.

      I did a bit more digging into this (my curiosity being fully piqued now...) and
      found this reference:

      http://filebox.vt.edu/users/jselmer/cauldrons.htm

      "Around 1500, iron cauldrons began replacing bronze cauldrons (Tylecote, 107).
      Figures 6-8 show renaissance kitchens and their reliance on large metal pots.
      These pots vary in size and use. Some of them hang, some of them have three
      feet, and some have both features. Figure 9 illustrates the mechanical
      advantage needed to remove a large cauldron of partly riveted construction
      from its stand over the fire. Another large 16th century cauldron is shown
      in Figure 10, where the entire fire and floor have been raised up on a
      pedestal."

      The "Tylecote" cited reference is:
      Tylecote, R. F. A History of Metallurgy: second edition. London: The
      Institute of Materials, 1992.

      The article taken as a whole (not just the paragraph I quote above) seems to
      mostly support Brangwayna's assertion that the Dutch oven as we know it was
      not used during most of our period of study -- but something very like it
      was just coming into common use at the end of our time period. (It is, IMO,
      reasonable to presume that some cauldrons would have lids, which makes them
      essentially Dutch ovens.)

      But it is clear that during most of our period of study, cookward would have
      been made of brass or bronze and would have been riveted rather than cast, in
      most cases.

      The above-linked article is worth reading and has photos and line drawings of
      cauldrons and cook pots from the Middle Ages, as well as a wealth of
      bibliographic citations for further reading.

      So I stand mostly corrected, though I think one could make a case that cast
      iron, lidded cook pots probably did exist at the very tail end of our period
      of study. For most of us (including 11th-century me, sadly), Brangwayna is
      right, and Dutch ovens would be out of period. But, as she points out, it's
      perfectly okay to use them in the SCA as long as you realize that you're
      using something slightly out of period and are okay with that. They may
      be a little late for our period, but they surely *look* medieval to me! :-)

      Kind regards,

      Justin

      --
      ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]xxxx()
      Maistor Iustinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
      Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two
      keys fesswise reversed sable.

      Marche of Alderford (Canton, Ohio) http://4th.com/sca/justin/
      justin@... PGP Public Key at http://4th.com/keys/justin.pubkey
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.