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cold dish for a feast

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  • J and D
    hey all my wife and i are going to Akornebir s newcomer encampment on may 13th and we need a cold dish for the feast and i would like to bring something peiod
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 29, 2005
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      hey all my wife and i are going to Akornebir's newcomer encampment on
      may 13th and we need a cold dish for the feast and i would like to
      bring something peiod any suggestions?


      Radulfus (at least for now)
    • Heather Murray
      ... Meat pies can be served cold. A few dry runs here are a good thing, so you can figure out your flavor/texture combinations. Do a Google search for
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 29, 2005
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        J and D wrote:

        > hey all my wife and i are going to Akornebir's newcomer encampment on
        > may 13th and we need a cold dish for the feast and i would like to
        > bring something peiod any suggestions?
        >
        >
        > Radulfus (at least for now)

        Meat pies can be served cold. A few dry runs here are a good thing, so
        you can figure out your flavor/texture combinations. Do a Google search
        for "Cariadoc's Miscellany" and you should find the general recipe for
        meat pies. As an initial hint, I would probably go with more sweet
        spices than savory - for some reason, I find that they do better for
        cold pies. As much as I like to use steak (it's inexpensive around here)
        cut into small pieces, were I to do a meat pie today (hm - that actually
        sounds like a good idea, since I'd not yet planned for dinner), I'd
        likely cut it into smallish, bite-size pieces, and then pop'em in the
        processor and pulse it two or three times to get pieces just over the
        size of a "chili grind." I'd think it would contribute to easier eating.
        I'd also recommend something well-marbled. I've noticed that I don't
        like lean steak as much as something like an inexpensive chuck or even a
        round, cut right.

        Margaret Northwode


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      • Elsa
        You could always bring dried fruit, fresh fruit, bread(especially homemade), cold meat, cheese and nuts. There are some good desserts on Godecookery that
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 30, 2005
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          You could always bring dried fruit, fresh fruit, bread(especially
          homemade), cold meat, cheese and nuts.

          There are some good desserts on Godecookery that should travel well.
          Cheesecake would travel well in a cooler. The person who said meat
          pies was correct. They are good cold or hot.

          If you want recipes I will gladly post them or email them to you.


          Elsa
        • Heather Murray
          ... Some things about taking meat pies along that I meant to mention. Bag anything that you re putting in a cooler with ice. The gallon ones work nicely, I
          Message 4 of 4 , May 1, 2005
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            Heather Murray wrote:

            > J and D wrote:
            >
            > > hey all my wife and i are going to Akornebir's newcomer encampment on
            > > may 13th and we need a cold dish for the feast and i would like to
            > > bring something peiod any suggestions?
            > >
            > >
            > > Radulfus (at least for now)
            >
            > Meat pies can be served cold. A few dry runs here are a good thing, so
            > you can figure out your flavor/texture combinations. Do a Google search
            > for "Cariadoc's Miscellany" and you should find the general recipe for
            > meat pies. As an initial hint, I would probably go with more sweet
            > spices than savory - for some reason, I find that they do better for
            > cold pies. As much as I like to use steak (it's inexpensive around here)
            > cut into small pieces, were I to do a meat pie today (hm - that actually
            > sounds like a good idea, since I'd not yet planned for dinner), I'd
            > likely cut it into smallish, bite-size pieces, and then pop'em in the
            > processor and pulse it two or three times to get pieces just over the
            > size of a "chili grind." I'd think it would contribute to easier eating.
            > I'd also recommend something well-marbled. I've noticed that I don't
            > like lean steak as much as something like an inexpensive chuck or even a
            > round, cut right.
            >
            > Margaret Northwode
            >
            Some things about taking meat pies along that I meant to mention.

            Bag anything that you're putting in a cooler with ice. The gallon ones
            work nicely, I find.
            Prior to bagging the meat pie, let it cool completely. Otherwise you'll
            pull out a soggy meat pie from the bag. BT, DT - tasty, but gooshy.
            Meat pies, especially those with wine/alcohol as an ingredient and with
            a crust, don't absolutely require refrigeration. Within bounds - I'd say
            about a day and a half, making sure that the meat and eggs are cooked.
            Either bake it the day you leave (or the night before) or fridge it till
            leaving for the event. Longer than that, I'd want cooling.

            My meat pies were quite tasty (Chawettys), though I'm out of saffron
            right now. : ( I happened to have a decent burgundy on hand, which is a
            tad abnormal for me since I prefer lighter vintages and my own perry. I
            made mine with 2 lb.s round and chuck, roughly ground in the processor.
            I also had no currant raisins (thought I did), but substituted golden
            raisins, and added grated sharp cheddar on the top. Lovely, and fairly
            cost-efficient - two pies (double the non-meat ingredients) cost me
            about $5-7 thanks to purchase of cheese on sale and meat at a good
            price. We've got about three meals out of them so far, and will get one
            more.

            Well, off to get breakfast,
            Margaret


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