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Re: garb fabric

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  • HI_it_is_me@yahoo.com
    Ok, so I have done a small pile of research recently into period fabrics since I ve been making all my own garb (and much of my friends as well). Satin is in
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 8, 2005
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      Ok, so I have done a small pile of research recently into period
      fabrics since I've been making all my own garb (and much of my
      friends' as well). Satin is in fact period to the SCA time frame....if
      it is in fact made of natural fiber (usually silk). If I remember
      correctly it was used from the 12th century on...maybe the 13th or so,
      I can't remember exactly because I have so many dates and fabrics
      running around in my head. So, as long as your personna isn't a 10th
      century something or another, then the satin shouldn't be a problem.
      The biggest concern with using Satin is that it would have been made
      from silk which wasn't exactly cheep, so most people short of the
      really wealthy wouldn't have had the cash to buy it. Some groups are
      picky about this and others aren't...so it all depends. (I just made a
      12th century Frankish style dress out of some great olive green satin
      that I got off a clearance rack at walmart for $1 a yard...and to my
      surprise I think it's actually made from natural fibers since it burns
      instead of melts when it touches flame.) Anyway, I hope this helps...
    • Alison Choyce
      ... From: HI_it_is_me@yahoo.com Yes, satin is a period weave.
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 8, 2005
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: HI_it_is_me@...

        << Satin is in fact period to the SCA time frame.>>

        Yes, satin is a period weave.

        <<if it is in fact made of natural fiber (usually silk).>>

        Silk, linen, and wool were all made into satin. Silk makes the prettiest satin. And of course silk dyes into more brilliant colors than you can get with wool or linen.

        <<(I just made a 12th century Frankish style dress out of some great olive green satin
        that I got off a clearance rack at walmart for $1 a yard...and to my
        surprise I think it's actually made from natural fibers since it burns
        instead of melts when it touches flame.) >>

        Sounds like you did well. Your dress must be beautiful in that color. The problem with using polyester or nylon is that 1) you would be uncomfortable wearing it, especially in hot weather. It does not breathe. And 2) it can be dangerous if you are cooking or are sitting close to a campfire, because if it catches fire you are more likely to be injured since it will keep burning. Wool silk and linen do not tend to continue to burn when they are pulled away from the flame. 3) Finally, if it is important to you be as accurate as you can be, then you would want to use what would have been available to your persona. At least to the extent it's available to us.

        Most people prefer not to use cotton in part because it was not commonly used, was more expensive than silk where it was available, and because it is less comfortable to wear than silk or lightweight wool in the heat. But to get good brocades most people overlook those problems and opt for cotton since most re-enactors cannot afford silk brocade, and it is still a natural fiber.

        In service,
        Alison Wodehalle
        Shire of Hartshorn-dale, East Kingdom





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jessica Marie
        Thanks so much to all of you for expanding my fabric knowledge! My fabric is now officially dyed, and i m happy with the result. RIT Dye recommends the
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 8, 2005
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          Thanks so much to all of you for expanding my fabric knowledge! My fabric
          is now officially dyed, and i'm happy with the result. RIT Dye recommends
          the fabrics 50% or more polyester not be dyed. Does anyone know why? i
          went ahead, though i'm still not sure about the fabric's content. i did
          find an interesting site regarding the burn test:

          http://www.fabriclink.com/Burntest.html

          i'm no scientist; it seems like my fabric could be silk...or acetate...but
          probably just some bizarre blend of man-made fibers.

          So as my overdress is faux silk-satin, could anyone recommend a fabric for
          an underdress? i have some white cotton, which doesn't seem appropriate,
          but if i buy silk, that's a *lot* of sumptuous fabric...and i don't want it
          to 'show-up' my satin overdress. Would linen work? i've gotten mixed
          messages as to whether the underdress was the sole undergarment for a
          cotehardie, so i'm afraid i'm grasping at straws and needing to do a little
          more research. Learning, slowly but surely!

          Blessed be,
          jessica


          ________________________________________
          "The misuse of language induces evil in the soul."
          -- Socrates




          >From: "Alison Choyce" <choyce@...>
          >Reply-To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
          >To: <scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com>
          >Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] Re: garb fabric
          >Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 17:25:07 -0500
          >
          >----- Original Message -----
          >From: HI_it_is_me@...
          >
          ><< Satin is in fact period to the SCA time frame.>>
          >
          >Yes, satin is a period weave.
          >
          ><<if it is in fact made of natural fiber (usually silk).>>
          >
          >Silk, linen, and wool were all made into satin. Silk makes the prettiest
          >satin. And of course silk dyes into more brilliant colors than you can get
          >with wool or linen.
          >
          ><<(I just made a 12th century Frankish style dress out of some great olive
          >green satin
          >that I got off a clearance rack at walmart for $1 a yard...and to my
          >surprise I think it's actually made from natural fibers since it burns
          >instead of melts when it touches flame.) >>
          >
          >Sounds like you did well. Your dress must be beautiful in that color. The
          >problem with using polyester or nylon is that 1) you would be uncomfortable
          >wearing it, especially in hot weather. It does not breathe. And 2) it can
          >be dangerous if you are cooking or are sitting close to a campfire, because
          >if it catches fire you are more likely to be injured since it will keep
          >burning. Wool silk and linen do not tend to continue to burn when they are
          >pulled away from the flame. 3) Finally, if it is important to you be as
          >accurate as you can be, then you would want to use what would have been
          >available to your persona. At least to the extent it's available to us.
          >
          >Most people prefer not to use cotton in part because it was not commonly
          >used, was more expensive than silk where it was available, and because it
          >is less comfortable to wear than silk or lightweight wool in the heat. But
          >to get good brocades most people overlook those problems and opt for cotton
          >since most re-enactors cannot afford silk brocade, and it is still a
          >natural fiber.
          >
          >In service,
          >Alison Wodehalle
          >Shire of Hartshorn-dale, East Kingdom
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Alison Choyce
          Quick answer is that polyester isn t created to take dye. Your
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 9, 2005
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            <<RIT Dye recommends
            the fabrics 50% or more polyester not be dyed. Does anyone know why? >>

            Quick answer is that polyester isn't created to take dye. Your satin may be rayon which will dye well.


            In service,
            Alison Wodehalle
            Shire of Hartshorn-dale, East Kingdom

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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