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Re: [SCA Newcomers] I need a better punching tool.

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  • Adrienne R. Ferrell
    ... Dear Kelsey, They hold up better than grommets. They don t pop out or have the fabric come out of one corner of the grommet. They take tighter lacing
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 1, 2005
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      At 11:13 PM 12/29/2004, you wrote:

      >Those are very pretty! Do they hold up to wear (my hook and eyes seem to
      >fall out often)?
      >
      >"Adrienne R. Ferrell" <aferrell@...> wrote:
      >Dear Katherine,
      >
      >Congratulations on your new bodice. I have to admit I am lousy with
      >grommets. One or two always go "wonky " on me. Here's a link to what I use
      >now.
      ><http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html>http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html
      >They are easy to sew on and look
      >great. Oh, these are really nice at the shoulder for adding
      >tie on sleeves.


      Dear Kelsey,

      They hold up better than grommets. They don't pop out or have the fabric
      come out of one corner of the grommet. They take
      tighter lacing better than grommets in my opinion. But what would really
      matter is how well you sew the finding on or how well
      you place the grommet. For either one, I really would suggest
      stabilizing the area they are going. Most patterns have this in their
      instructions. This is usually done with interfacing. It makes it a
      little harder to go through the extra layers if you are using grommets,
      but is worth the extra effort in the longevity of your garment. If you use
      the findings the interfacing gives you another layer to sew through,
      but it helps so that they do not rip out by forceful (tight) lacing.

      I hope you have a wonderful new year!

      sincerely,
      Seraphina


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • bronwynmgn@aol.com
      In a message dated 1/1/2005 5:56:52 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, aferrell@direcway.com writes:
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 1, 2005
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        In a message dated 1/1/2005 5:56:52 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
        aferrell@... writes:

        <<For either one, I really would suggest
        stabilizing the area they are going. Most patterns have this in their
        instructions. This is usually done with interfacing. It makes it a
        little harder to go through the extra layers if you are using grommets,
        but is worth the extra effort in the longevity of your garment.>>

        In period, one of the more common methods for making lacing holes was to do
        handsewn eyelets. Interestingly, the area where these were to be placed was
        also stabilized, based on surviving scraps and pieces of clothing from the
        period. The area where the eyelets were to be sewn would be faced with a piece
        of silk, and the eyelets worked through both whatever the garment material
        was and the silk. Silk being a rather strong fabric, it works quite
        effectively. Something else that helps with keeping the holes from ripping out is,
        rather than punching a hole in the fabric, using a dull awl or similar tool to
        pass between the fibers of the weave and stretch a hole open. Since you
        haven't cut any fibers, the hole is less likely to fray or rip open further,
        whereas cutting the fibers produces a weak spot in the fabric.


        Brangwayna Morgan
        Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
        Lancaster, PA


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Dianne & Greg Stucki
        ... From: Adrienne R. Ferrell To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, January 01, 2005 5:56 AM Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] I need a better punching
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 1, 2005
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Adrienne R. Ferrell
          To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, January 01, 2005 5:56 AM
          Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] I need a better punching tool.


          At 11:13 PM 12/29/2004, you wrote:

          >Those are very pretty! Do they hold up to wear (my hook and eyes seem to
          >fall out often)?
          >
          >"Adrienne R. Ferrell" <aferrell@...> wrote:
          >Dear Katherine,
          >
          >Congratulations on your new bodice. I have to admit I am lousy with
          >grommets. One or two always go "wonky " on me. Here's a link to what I use
          >now.
          ><http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html>http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html
          >They are easy to sew on and look
          >great. Oh, these are really nice at the shoulder for adding
          >tie on sleeves.


          May I add, you can also buy some very nice quality grommets from Thorny Rose--the last time I bought some, they were seven dollars per GROSS, including shipping. I now use hand-stitched eyelets on clothing for myself, but I use grommets from Thorny Rose on the garb I sell.

          Laurensa

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Marco and Jitka Sainte
          ... Ok, I have a couple of grommets that came out of my bodice (bad grommets! no biscuit!) and I don t know how to fix them. The hole is huge, but I do have
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 1, 2005
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            bronwynmgn@... wrote:

            > In a message dated 1/1/2005 5:56:52 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
            > aferrell@... writes:
            >
            > <<For either one, I really would suggest
            > stabilizing the area they are going. Most patterns have this in their
            > instructions. This is usually done with interfacing. It makes it a
            > little harder to go through the extra layers if you are using grommets,
            > but is worth the extra effort in the longevity of your garment.>>
            >
            > In period, one of the more common methods for making lacing holes was
            > to do
            > handsewn eyelets. Interestingly, the area where these were to be
            > placed was
            > also stabilized, based on surviving scraps and pieces of clothing from
            > the
            > period. The area where the eyelets were to be sewn would be faced
            > with a piece
            > of silk, and the eyelets worked through both whatever the garment
            > material
            > was and the silk. Silk being a rather strong fabric, it works quite
            > effectively. Something else that helps with keeping the holes from
            > ripping out is,
            > rather than punching a hole in the fabric, using a dull awl or
            > similar tool to
            > pass between the fibers of the weave and stretch a hole open. Since you
            > haven't cut any fibers, the hole is less likely to fray or rip open
            > further,
            > whereas cutting the fibers produces a weak spot in the fabric.

            Ok, I have a couple of grommets that came out of my bodice (bad
            grommets! no biscuit!) and I don't know how to fix them. The hole is
            huge, but I do have some of the original fabric, and, strangely enough,
            some silk, although not in the same color. How can I fix this? I assume
            it's going to involve a lot of hand-sewing, especially since I want to
            also cover the other grommets to match. (This will be quite a challenge,
            since my hand-sewing skills are horrendous, and I have the patience of a
            cat waiting for a bath.... in other words, I'd rather be doing almost
            anything BESIDES hand-sewing.) Any suggestions?

            Fiora Soranzo
            Shire of Greyhope, Constellation, Middle Kingdom


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