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I need a better punching tool.

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  • Kelsey Pennington
    I am very excited for myself and my home is very mundane I am the only Scadian here so basically my family is: Oh that s nice sweetie . Today I finished my
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 29, 2004
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      I am very excited for myself and my home is very mundane I am the only Scadian here so basically my family is: "Oh that's nice sweetie". Today I finished my very first Elizabethan tabbed bodice. My blood and sweat went into this baby and it looks so cool! I was using my new punching tool for putting in grommets and the hammer slipped ( should have been using my rubber mallet I know) and I hit my thumb...hit it so hard that it cut the skin... Do not fear no blood got on the bodice. The punching tool may work very well for tarps but not at all well for cloth.

      Really the whole point of this (Other than me patting myself on the back) is... does anyone know where I might find a good punch tool for cloth in 1/2 inch size? Thank you!

      Oh yeah and my thumb is fine, though a little tingly. I have taken a bunch of ibuprofen and have it nice and wrapped with pain relieving neoprene till the bleeding stops.

      Thank you,
      Katherine





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    • Adrienne R. Ferrell
      Dear Katherine, Congratulations on your new bodice. I have to admit I am lousy with grommets. One or two always go wonky on me. Here s a link to what I
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 29, 2004
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        Dear Katherine,

        Congratulations on your new bodice. I have to admit I am lousy with
        grommets. One or two always go "wonky " on me. Here's a link to what I use
        now. http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html They are easy to sew on and look
        great. Oh, these are really nice at the shoulder for adding
        tie on sleeves.

        I hope you find this useful.

        sincerely,
        Seraphina

        At 09:57 PM 12/29/2004, you wrote:

        >I am very excited for myself and my home is very mundane I am the only
        >Scadian here so basically my family is: "Oh that's nice sweetie". Today I
        >finished my very first Elizabethan tabbed bodice. My blood and sweat went
        >into this baby and it looks so cool! I was using my new punching tool for
        >putting in grommets and the hammer slipped ( should have been using my
        >rubber mallet I know) and I hit my thumb...hit it so hard that it cut the
        >skin... Do not fear no blood got on the bodice. The punching tool may work
        >very well for tarps but not at all well for cloth.
        >
        >Really the whole point of this (Other than me patting myself on the back)
        >is... does anyone know where I might find a good punch tool for cloth in
        >1/2 inch size? Thank you!
        >
        >Oh yeah and my thumb is fine, though a little tingly. I have taken a bunch
        >of ibuprofen and have it nice and wrapped with pain relieving neoprene
        >till the bleeding stops.
        >
        >Thank you,
        >Katherine
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • Kelsey Pennington
        Those are very pretty! Do they hold up to wear (my hook and eyes seem to fall out often)? Adrienne R. Ferrell wrote: Dear Katherine,
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 29, 2004
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          Those are very pretty! Do they hold up to wear (my hook and eyes seem to fall out often)?

          "Adrienne R. Ferrell" <aferrell@...> wrote:
          Dear Katherine,

          Congratulations on your new bodice. I have to admit I am lousy with
          grommets. One or two always go "wonky " on me. Here's a link to what I use
          now. http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html They are easy to sew on and look
          great. Oh, these are really nice at the shoulder for adding
          tie on sleeves.

          I hope you find this useful.

          sincerely,
          Seraphina

          At 09:57 PM 12/29/2004, you wrote:

          >I am very excited for myself and my home is very mundane I am the only
          >Scadian here so basically my family is: "Oh that's nice sweetie". Today I
          >finished my very first Elizabethan tabbed bodice. My blood and sweat went
          >into this baby and it looks so cool! I was using my new punching tool for
          >putting in grommets and the hammer slipped ( should have been using my
          >rubber mallet I know) and I hit my thumb...hit it so hard that it cut the
          >skin... Do not fear no blood got on the bodice. The punching tool may work
          >very well for tarps but not at all well for cloth.
          >
          >Really the whole point of this (Other than me patting myself on the back)
          >is... does anyone know where I might find a good punch tool for cloth in
          >1/2 inch size? Thank you!
          >
          >Oh yeah and my thumb is fine, though a little tingly. I have taken a bunch
          >of ibuprofen and have it nice and wrapped with pain relieving neoprene
          >till the bleeding stops.
          >
          >Thank you,
          >Katherine
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >---------------------------------
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          >Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more.
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          >click here
          >
          >[]
          >
          >
          >
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          > * To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > *
          > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scanewcomers/>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scanewcomers/
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        • Jeff Gedney
          Another alternative is to sew in metal rings for grommets. You can either sew in the rings and lace right through them, or if you want real strength, you can
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 30, 2004
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            Another alternative is to sew in metal rings for grommets.

            You can either sew in the rings and lace right through them, or if
            you want real strength, you can buttonhole stitch the rings flat to
            make true grommets that dont LOOK like your bodice was partly made
            in a hardware store. You completely cover the rings with the stitch.
            Not only does that hide the ring, it allows the ring to distribute
            the lacing stress over the entire area covered by the ring, which is
            exactly what the metal grommets are designed to do (but only if
            properly and tightly set... improperly setting the grommet will
            only speed tearout by placing the stress on only one side of the
            hole, and unfortunately hide the tearout until outright failure.

            This is how grommets were done, for the most part, in period.
            The metal punch grommets are, I believe, a fairly modern invention.

            Alternatively, you can make small rings of strong line by making a
            loop, and then passing the free ends though the loop several times
            going around the loop. Then you can sew this ring down like a metal
            ring.

            The advantage of the cordage loop grommets is that it never will
            pull out or catch on anything, nor will it discolor your fabric if
            it oxidizes (which even, stainless will do, eventually).

            Another period technique I have seen, (more commonly seen in Tent
            making) was to sew on tabs of leather which were punched through.

            The main advantages to making your own grommets are 1) strength,
            2) you get to set the size of the hole you want to use, 3)you
            don't have to worry about smashing your thumbs or not tightly
            setting the grommet, and 4)it can be made in a harmonizing color
            with the ground fabric, instead of just being brass or silver.

            Capt Elias
            -Renaissance Geek of the Cyber Seas

            -------------------------------------------------------------
            If you want to build a ship, don't drum up the men to gather
            wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them
            to yearn for the vast and endless sea.
            - Antoine de Saint Exupery
          • Iustinos Tekton called Justin
            ... Be careful that you don t wrap too tightly. That thumb may be swollen, or may swell more than it has, and you don t want to reduce circulation. The purpose
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 30, 2004
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              On Wednesday 29 December 2004 22:57, Kelsey Pennington wrote:
              > Oh yeah and my thumb is fine, though a little tingly. I have taken a bunch
              > of ibuprofen and have it nice and wrapped with pain relieving neoprene
              > till the bleeding stops.

              Be careful that you don't wrap too tightly. That thumb may be swollen, or
              may swell more than it has, and you don't want to reduce circulation.

              The purpose of a pressure wrap, assuming something isn't bleeding, is to
              provide a slight increase in ambient pressure in order to support vascular
              muscles (the little muscles that allow blood vessels to constrict when
              the body needs them to) in cases where the muscles are temporarily damaged
              by injury. The pressure wrap isn't meant to "hold down swelling" or anything
              drastic like that.

              I don't mean to be a nudge, but over-wrapping is a common error people make.

              Justin
              Master Chirurgeon (in the SCA, that's a first-aid provider; in the modern
              world, I'm an EMT)

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              SCAtoday.net -- Your independent source for news of the Current Middle Ages
              http://scatoday.net/
            • Adrienne R. Ferrell
              ... Dear Kelsey, They hold up better than grommets. They don t pop out or have the fabric come out of one corner of the grommet. They take tighter lacing
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 1, 2005
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                At 11:13 PM 12/29/2004, you wrote:

                >Those are very pretty! Do they hold up to wear (my hook and eyes seem to
                >fall out often)?
                >
                >"Adrienne R. Ferrell" <aferrell@...> wrote:
                >Dear Katherine,
                >
                >Congratulations on your new bodice. I have to admit I am lousy with
                >grommets. One or two always go "wonky " on me. Here's a link to what I use
                >now.
                ><http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html>http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html
                >They are easy to sew on and look
                >great. Oh, these are really nice at the shoulder for adding
                >tie on sleeves.


                Dear Kelsey,

                They hold up better than grommets. They don't pop out or have the fabric
                come out of one corner of the grommet. They take
                tighter lacing better than grommets in my opinion. But what would really
                matter is how well you sew the finding on or how well
                you place the grommet. For either one, I really would suggest
                stabilizing the area they are going. Most patterns have this in their
                instructions. This is usually done with interfacing. It makes it a
                little harder to go through the extra layers if you are using grommets,
                but is worth the extra effort in the longevity of your garment. If you use
                the findings the interfacing gives you another layer to sew through,
                but it helps so that they do not rip out by forceful (tight) lacing.

                I hope you have a wonderful new year!

                sincerely,
                Seraphina


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • bronwynmgn@aol.com
                In a message dated 1/1/2005 5:56:52 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, aferrell@direcway.com writes:
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 1, 2005
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                  In a message dated 1/1/2005 5:56:52 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                  aferrell@... writes:

                  <<For either one, I really would suggest
                  stabilizing the area they are going. Most patterns have this in their
                  instructions. This is usually done with interfacing. It makes it a
                  little harder to go through the extra layers if you are using grommets,
                  but is worth the extra effort in the longevity of your garment.>>

                  In period, one of the more common methods for making lacing holes was to do
                  handsewn eyelets. Interestingly, the area where these were to be placed was
                  also stabilized, based on surviving scraps and pieces of clothing from the
                  period. The area where the eyelets were to be sewn would be faced with a piece
                  of silk, and the eyelets worked through both whatever the garment material
                  was and the silk. Silk being a rather strong fabric, it works quite
                  effectively. Something else that helps with keeping the holes from ripping out is,
                  rather than punching a hole in the fabric, using a dull awl or similar tool to
                  pass between the fibers of the weave and stretch a hole open. Since you
                  haven't cut any fibers, the hole is less likely to fray or rip open further,
                  whereas cutting the fibers produces a weak spot in the fabric.


                  Brangwayna Morgan
                  Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
                  Lancaster, PA


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Dianne & Greg Stucki
                  ... From: Adrienne R. Ferrell To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, January 01, 2005 5:56 AM Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] I need a better punching
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 1, 2005
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                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Adrienne R. Ferrell
                    To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Saturday, January 01, 2005 5:56 AM
                    Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] I need a better punching tool.


                    At 11:13 PM 12/29/2004, you wrote:

                    >Those are very pretty! Do they hold up to wear (my hook and eyes seem to
                    >fall out often)?
                    >
                    >"Adrienne R. Ferrell" <aferrell@...> wrote:
                    >Dear Katherine,
                    >
                    >Congratulations on your new bodice. I have to admit I am lousy with
                    >grommets. One or two always go "wonky " on me. Here's a link to what I use
                    >now.
                    ><http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html>http://www.thornyrose.com/misc.html
                    >They are easy to sew on and look
                    >great. Oh, these are really nice at the shoulder for adding
                    >tie on sleeves.


                    May I add, you can also buy some very nice quality grommets from Thorny Rose--the last time I bought some, they were seven dollars per GROSS, including shipping. I now use hand-stitched eyelets on clothing for myself, but I use grommets from Thorny Rose on the garb I sell.

                    Laurensa

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Marco and Jitka Sainte
                    ... Ok, I have a couple of grommets that came out of my bodice (bad grommets! no biscuit!) and I don t know how to fix them. The hole is huge, but I do have
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 1, 2005
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                      bronwynmgn@... wrote:

                      > In a message dated 1/1/2005 5:56:52 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                      > aferrell@... writes:
                      >
                      > <<For either one, I really would suggest
                      > stabilizing the area they are going. Most patterns have this in their
                      > instructions. This is usually done with interfacing. It makes it a
                      > little harder to go through the extra layers if you are using grommets,
                      > but is worth the extra effort in the longevity of your garment.>>
                      >
                      > In period, one of the more common methods for making lacing holes was
                      > to do
                      > handsewn eyelets. Interestingly, the area where these were to be
                      > placed was
                      > also stabilized, based on surviving scraps and pieces of clothing from
                      > the
                      > period. The area where the eyelets were to be sewn would be faced
                      > with a piece
                      > of silk, and the eyelets worked through both whatever the garment
                      > material
                      > was and the silk. Silk being a rather strong fabric, it works quite
                      > effectively. Something else that helps with keeping the holes from
                      > ripping out is,
                      > rather than punching a hole in the fabric, using a dull awl or
                      > similar tool to
                      > pass between the fibers of the weave and stretch a hole open. Since you
                      > haven't cut any fibers, the hole is less likely to fray or rip open
                      > further,
                      > whereas cutting the fibers produces a weak spot in the fabric.

                      Ok, I have a couple of grommets that came out of my bodice (bad
                      grommets! no biscuit!) and I don't know how to fix them. The hole is
                      huge, but I do have some of the original fabric, and, strangely enough,
                      some silk, although not in the same color. How can I fix this? I assume
                      it's going to involve a lot of hand-sewing, especially since I want to
                      also cover the other grommets to match. (This will be quite a challenge,
                      since my hand-sewing skills are horrendous, and I have the patience of a
                      cat waiting for a bath.... in other words, I'd rather be doing almost
                      anything BESIDES hand-sewing.) Any suggestions?

                      Fiora Soranzo
                      Shire of Greyhope, Constellation, Middle Kingdom


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