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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Introduction

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  • Sarah Krans
    And she hasn t even seen my good silk CW dress and bonnet (which I have pictures of, by the way) !! LOL I think I may start with a cotehardie as I really
    Message 1 of 33 , Dec 23, 2004
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      And she hasn't even seen my good silk CW dress and bonnet (which I have
      pictures of, by the way) !! LOL

      I think I may start with a cotehardie as I really don't want to do
      something right now that would have anything remotely resembling a
      corset or stays! I've made both for myself and they are basically a
      pain in the butt - to wear and sew! LOL I also think cotehdardie
      would be a good dress to start with becuse I have short hair (think
      Gwyneth Paltrow in Sliding Doors short - in the 'what if' reality) and
      a veil would hide that nicely! Thankfully I already have some really
      nice linen at home that I just have to bring back to Louisville when I
      get to head to WI the first of the year. I have a beautiful coffee
      brown (about 8 yards or so), a lovely orange (about 5 yards), and a
      gorgeous blue (about 5 yards). I got these for Rev War dresses and
      checked to make sure that they are natural dye colours - which they
      are. I attended an event at Old Fort Niagara a few years back and
      attended a class on natural dyes and purchased a swatch book that I can
      check fabrics again - if the fabric doesn't clash with the swatches
      they are natural colours.

      Being interested in fashion history is always a bad thing because you
      always want to do more - the snowball effect if you will. Oh wait,
      that's most history in general!! I'm doing genealogical research for
      my DAR application and I've gotten to the point where I want to get to
      KNOW more about my ancestors as people - what they were like, why they
      moved, etc. The trick is to find like-minded people to discuss these
      types of things with.

      Okay, so now that I have a general starting point for my clothing, what
      about a name? I like too many European countries and cultures. Now, I
      know that I could always stick with my modern name because both Sarah
      and Ann are Biblical and are period correct for basically every
      historical period (unless we would be doing about 1900BC or earlier but
      I really don't see that happening! LOL). Here's the quandry. I've
      lived in Germany and Ireland and am of English, Scandinavian, Prussian,
      and Polish ancestry - all of which interest me greatly! I also know
      that I don't HAVE to figure out an SCA name, but in my 9 years of
      reenacting I have never come up with a persona and would like to start
      (that whole jumping in head first thing. . . ).

      Anyway, I'm going to grab a bit of dinner and get to sleep as today was
      a really long day (left my house at 4:30am, took an hour to get my car
      out and finally got to the airport at 6am and finally got into Fort
      Lauderdale and into the hotel around 5pm - originally supposed to be
      2:30pm!)

      Sarah


      On 19 Dec 2004, at 19:04, Alison Choyce wrote:

      >
      >
      >>> I do find my problem is that I
      > like costuming WAY too much and that's why I would have difficulties
      > finding a time period with which to start!<<
      >
      > She is telling stories, but they're all good. ;)
      >
      > I love costuming myself and understand the difficulty. I want to make
      > a bit of everything, and I want to understand all the costume changes
      > that occurred from culture to culture, and time to time. Best
      > suggestion to start with: think about what you first dreamed of
      > wearing when you began to think about doing the middle ages. For many
      > it is the cotehardie because that is part of the high middle ages and
      > what we tend to envision when we think of knights and ladies and
      > tournaments and such. The AOTC list will be a wonderful resource if
      > you choose to start there. It is not terribly difficult for someone
      > who is already an experienced seamstress, just a somewhat different
      > way of thinking of the garment and its function, since this is the
      > supportive layer, rather than a corset. I'm sure you are already
      > aware of the website www.cottesimple.com by Marcele de Montsegur (also
      > of Hartshorn-dale). It is a wonderful resource done as a photo essay
      > on how to fit a cotte.
      >
      > Then there's 12th century Norman clothing, 9th century Viking, 15th
      > century Flemish, 15th century Burgundian, Tudor, German Renn, Italian
      > Renn.. . . . . . .
      >
      > Well, I may live long enough.....
      >
      > In service,
      > Alison Wodehalle
      >
      > Oh and middle eastern, and Japanese
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
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    • Sarah Krans
      Actually, you can directly compare (placing the fabric under the yarn/colour swatches which are hand dyed with natural dyes) and tell which colours are able to
      Message 33 of 33 , Dec 28, 2004
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        Actually, you can directly compare (placing the fabric under the
        yarn/colour swatches which are hand dyed with natural dyes) and tell
        which colours are able to be reproduced with natural dyes despite the
        fabric actually being dyed with synthetic dyes. There is a noticable
        difference between colours that can ONLY be achieved synthetically and
        those that can be achieved through natural means. Keep in mind, though
        that there are quite a few colours available today which are achieved
        synthetically but can be achieved naturally - sorry if that is
        confusing.

        Sarah

        On 24 Dec 2004, at 00:57, Marco and Jitka Sainte wrote:

        >
        > Quote:
        > purchased a swatch book that I can
        > check fabrics again - if the fabric doesn't clash with the swatches
        > they are natural colours.
        >
        > Please explain? It sounds like you're saying that you can just look at
        > something compared to something else to see if it's a natural color.
        > That doesn't sound right to me.
        >
        > Fiora
        >
        >
        > --
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        >
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        > Yahoo! Groups Links
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