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Re: [SCA Newcomers] garb for late 13th early 14th period

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  • Alison Choyce
    Happy Thanksgiving!
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 25, 2004
      Happy Thanksgiving!


      <<Hello
      i am looking for cheap and easy garb for late 13th early 14th..I
      spent the majority of my cash on my arness so i need some low cost
      ways to get my garb.Any ideas ???Also i need to know what people wore
      in the period as well..:) to make life real difficult for ya'll>>


      There are people on this list more knowledgeable than myself, but late 13th/early 14th century is still mostly T-tunics. The fitted garments come about mid 14th century. The Manesse Codex is a famous manuscript from the 1st half of the fourteenth century which has excellent depictions of loose fitting T-tunic type garb, both male and female. This is a link to pictures from Manesse Codex. http://www.manesse.de/manesse0-9.shtml .

      Now you said cheap and easy. Does this mean you would like to make it yourself? Cynthia Virtue's website gives great advice for how to get started, which materials are appropriate, and how to make it. Her web address is http://www.virtue.to/articles/ . I would suggest that if you decide not to buy wool or linen for your first garb, that you at least use a natural fiber, cotton, and only make one two outfits so that if you later decide that the wool or linen option is the better choice you will not have wasted time and funds on something you no longer like. Stick with plain colors at first, until you become familiar with other fabrics that may have been used. There are brocades and various weaves that were used at that time.

      Good luck,
      Alison



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • bronwynmgn@aol.com
      In a message dated 11/25/2004 1:52:39 PM Eastern Standard Time, choyce@comcast.net writes:
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 27, 2004
        In a message dated 11/25/2004 1:52:39 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        choyce@... writes:

        <<Now you said cheap and easy. Does this mean you would like to make it
        yourself? Cynthia Virtue's website gives great advice for how to get started,
        which materials are appropriate, and how to make it. Her web address is
        http://www.virtue.to/articles/ . I would suggest that if you decide not to buy wool
        or linen for your first garb, that you at least use a natural fiber, cotton,
        and only make one two outfits so that if you later decide that the wool or linen
        option is the better choice you will not have wasted time and funds on
        something you no longer like. >>

        Excellent advice.

        Many newcomers discount linen or wool as options for "cheap and easy" because
        they a) only see these fabrics in chain stores which sell them at very high
        prices ($10-15/yard if you are lucky) and b) have heard all their lives that
        they are both very difficult to take care of - ie both must be drycleaned, linen
        wrinkles hideously and always needs ironed, wool shrinks at the drop of a
        hat, etc. Most people also believe that all wool is hot and scratchy.

        Try online sources for linen and wool, such as www.fabrics-store.com,
        www.fashionfabricsclub.com, and I think there is also a www.fabrics.com . In most
        cases you can find wool or linen on these sites for $5-8/yard and sometimes as
        low as $3-5/yd. Most will send you swatches of specific items for free or a
        very small cost so you can see a sample of the fabric before you buy it. Yes,
        it's still more expensive than $1/yd Walmart fabric, but there are advantages
        to these fabrics that Walmart fabrics don't have - linen, for example, is the
        coolest fabric (in terms of wearing it on hot days) that I've ever found, and
        wool has an added advantage of being naturally water-resistant as well as
        keeping you warm even if it does get wet. Thin wools, usually sold as
        "summer-weight" or "tropical weight" breathe very well and can be used in US summer
        temperatures comfortably.

        As far as the care issues, modern items made from linen usually have very
        crisp lines and shapes, which is why you are advised to dry clean them. Once you
        wash linen, you can't really get that look back. But medieval things made
        with linen have much softer, flowing lines, and washed linen is perfect for
        them. My linen clothes get thrown in the washer with all of my other clothes,
        and hung out to dry in summer (with most of my modern clothes) or tossed in the
        dryer. They come out softer and softer each time. Even if they sit there in
        the dryer or laundry basket and get a bit wrinkled, their own weight hanging
        on a hanger or off of your body will usually pull the wrinkles out in an hour
        or so. The only thing I ever iron is my linen veils, and I don't always do
        them.

        Wool is usually used for an outer layer of medieval clothing, and as such,
        usually just needs aired rather than washed unless you've either sweated heavily
        or spilled something on it, since it doesn't really touch your skin (except
        for wool hose, of course). As long as you prepare it properly, by washing it
        in the hottest water you can and running it through the dryer BEFORE cutting
        your garment (make sure you buy a bit extra because this WILL cause shrinkage),
        you can then wash it in cold water and hang it to dry without it shrinking
        further. The initial shrinking process also tends to make the wool more
        water-resistant. If you get enough good thick coat wool for a long outer garment or
        cloak, you can stay out in pouring rain (like the last Friday of Pennsic this
        year) for quite a long time withut getting wet underneath - I was out in full
        downpour for about 45 minutes with a gown and hood of coat wool on, and when I
        took them off, everything underneath was bone dry.




        Brangwayna Morgan
        Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
        Lancaster, PA


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • legolasfic
        How do you go about chosing a name for your persona. I ve narrowed my time period to 14th century england, Now how do I find a name? Trish
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 29, 2004
          How do you go about chosing a name for your persona. I've narrowed my
          time period to 14th century england, Now how do I find a name?

          Trish
        • Doug Petroshius
          If you search on the internet, that can help. Plus a trip to your local library or university libraries is good too. They often have books that just contain
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 2, 2004
            If you search on the internet, that can help.

            Plus a trip to your local library or university libraries is good too. They
            often have books that just contain names that were used in various time
            periods.

            ~Gintaras~
            Midrealm
            Midlands
            Ravenslake




            >From: "legolasfic" <LadyAranel@...>
            >Reply-To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
            >To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [SCA Newcomers] chosen a period, now I need a name
            >Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 13:00:13 -0000
            >
            >
            >
            >How do you go about chosing a name for your persona. I've narrowed my
            >time period to 14th century england, Now how do I find a name?
            >
            >Trish
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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