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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Digest Number 636

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  • Sharon Persley
    Hello Can we all just take a deep breath and rlize this is a Hobby not a way of life. We are just playing here. For some people I know this is a far fetched
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 1, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello
      Can we all just take a deep breath and rlize this is a "Hobby" not a way of life. We are just playing here. For some people I know this is a far fetched idea but it is still true regardless. I would never have spent $50.00 a yrd. for any fabric. No matter how long I have been in the SCA. The piont I was trying to get across is never spend more than you can afford. make what is comfortable and be happy with what you have made for yourself. Besides if we are really going to be period..... we should all be making our cloth and yarn and thread and sewing by hand. I do know some people who have sheep they make the yarn they use to make socks and shawls....etc.
      Another point please keep your harsh comments to a minimum. This is a site for new people to get help with their problem be it name or clothes or finding a group. The last thing they need is someone telling them they are wrong for wanting a cheaper way to make thier outfit so they can play too.
      I am about to make myself a dress from a Comforter (bed spread) completely cotton and has a nice design. It will work for my persona. I have been playing in the SCA for 10 + yrs. and I have never been told I used the wrong fabric.
      If I have stepped on toes I am sorry but I am one of the first persons new people come in contact with and I would like them to have a place where they can get help with out being ridiculed.
      Always in the Service of the Dream,
      Iseabail McTavish
      (mundane Sharon K Persley, if there is someone who feels they need to email me for whatever reason please feel free to email me at spersley@... please make the heading SCA.... or it will be deleted.)

      scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      There are 10 messages in this issue.

      Topics in this digest:

      1. wool and linen for less
      From: wambat13@...
      2. Re: Fabric questions
      From: bronwynmgn@...
      3. Re: Fabric questions
      From: tori T
      4. Re: Fabric questions
      From: chemistbb3
      5. Re: Fabric questions
      From: Kirianna
      6. Re: Fabric questions
      From: tori T
      7. Re: Fabric questions
      From: Katie Pleasance
      8. Re: Fabric questions
      From: Susan Farmer
      9. Re: Fabric questions
      From: Kirianna
      10. Re: Fabric questions
      From: "Tirloch O'Riordain"


      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 1
      Date: Wed, 30 Jun 2004 17:54:24 -0700
      From: wambat13@...
      Subject: wool and linen for less



      http://store.yahoo.com/phoenixtextiles/deals---steals-clearance-closeout-
      30--off-embroidered-linen.html
      A good source for linen at a sale price.
      Wool can be found here for good prices some time too.
      Dharma Trading
      http://www.dharmatrading.com/
      has good silk prices

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 2
      Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2004 07:27:14 EDT
      From: bronwynmgn@...
      Subject: Re: Fabric questions

      In a message dated 6/30/2004 2:22:58 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:

      <garment in Competition.>>

      <authentisity almost any fabric will do.>>

      Several people have made this comment in this thread, and it perturbs me.

      Is not the SCA an "educational" organization? Are we not supposed to be
      educating people about the Middle Ages and Renaissance?

      I understand full well that it can be difficult and expensive to find some of
      the fabrics used in period for garments, and that substitutions may well be
      needed at times (silk velvet for Renaissance stuff, for example; if you can
      find it, it's about $50/yard if you're really lucky). I've used cheap fabrics
      myself in my early years in the SCA, but I am now a convert to using only
      period-correct fabrics, even if I have to scrimp and save to afford them and limit
      the number of garments I have. Competition is not and never has been a reason;
      I don't do competitions, ever. So, why?

      Because I have learned far more about life in the Middle Ages by sticking to
      the period options. I've learned why they made clothing the way they did and
      why they wore it the way they wore it and what it did for them. I've learned
      that clothing made to period patterns using the correct period materials is
      FAR more comfortable, long-wearing, and suited to our many camping events with
      their varying weather than any modern fabric could be.

      We've already talked about the comfort of natural fibers over synthetics.
      When you make it to proper period patterns, it's easier to put together,
      generally uses less fabric, and works better for active movement. My wool and linen
      tunics have lasted for many years - up to 10 in some cases - without needing
      repairs at all; when I was wearing polycotton and cotton gauze and old
      bedsheets I was constantly having to restitch seams that had come out and repair tears
      and wear holes. For hot events, linen cannot be beaten as a comfort fabric,
      and when it gets cold at night, or when you have a couple of days that are 50
      degrees and raining, a good wool tunic over the linen underdress will keep you
      comfortable and cozy warm and DRY for the most part. No need to run around
      in wet, clingy polycotton or see through gauze, wrapped in a cloak and
      shivering. Go about your business in a heavy wool tunic and hood and wool socks and
      you'll be comfortable all day long, without the cloak in your way. And
      certainly no need for plastic ponchos or trashbags over your clothes, as I've seen at
      any number of events.

      It makes sense that it should work that way; after all, medieval and
      renaissance people didn't have indoor climate control or modern waterproof materials
      (and wool works better than a rubberized or plastic raincoat anyway), and they
      lived far more in the weather than we do; most of us shuttle back and forth
      between our houses, offices, and cars and hardly are out in the weather. Why
      do we insist that they were always miserable in bad (or good, for that matter)
      weather? Because we make our "medieval" clothes out of the wrong stuff (stuff
      that was designed for use in climate-controlled conditions) and then complain
      when it doesn't keep us comfortable when we're out in real weather.

      I don't encourage people to use period fabric because they can win
      competitions by using it. I encourage its use because it is more practical for what
      we're doing in the long run. What good is having 10 outfits made of cheap fabric
      off the dollar-a-yard table and always going home complaining about how
      uncomfortable you were at the event and how many repairs you need to make, when you
      can have two made of the correct fabrics and be comfortable?

      And no, I don't dry clean my linen and wool outfits. The linen goes in the
      washer and dryer or hangs out to dry and the only thing I ever iron is my
      veils; the wool gets aired out and brushed off (something my 80+ year old neighbors
      still do with their own wool coats, skirts and suits) unless it really needs
      washed and then it goes in the washer in cold water and hangs to dry.


      Brangwayna Morgan
      Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
      Lancaster, PA


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 3
      Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2004 06:45:04 -0700 (PDT)
      From: tori T
      Subject: Re: Fabric questions


      I have a problem with this last message. some of the things said, yes were true. BUT there are people like myself who work full time just to be broke. And I'm not one of those people who buys wants over needs. Some times people have to use old bed sheets and dollar-a-yard fabric. I am proud to say I am one of them. I have never yet said "oh that dress was so uncomfortable" or "ugh, another repair I have to make". If you do these things corectly, you wont be uncomfortable or have to make repairs all the time. I just got done making another dress for myself and my dad said "thats an old sheet?!?". Yes it was and it is THE most comfortable, best looking dress I have made. So dont go ragging on people and saying it's wrong to use cheeper fabric and old sheets just because we cant all have money like you. if it's period (which cotton is) and it's comfortable and warm (my first dress and first event was made with cotton and I stayed way warm with 4 inches of snow on the ground with NO
      cloak) then wear it!

      Antonia



      bronwynmgn@... wrote: In a message dated 6/30/2004 2:22:58 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:

      <garment in Competition.>>

      <authentisity almost any fabric will do.>>

      Several people have made this comment in this thread, and it perturbs me.

      Is not the SCA an "educational" organization? Are we not supposed to be
      educating people about the Middle Ages and Renaissance?

      I understand full well that it can be difficult and expensive to find some of
      the fabrics used in period for garments, and that substitutions may well be
      needed at times (silk velvet for Renaissance stuff, for example; if you can
      find it, it's about $50/yard if you're really lucky). I've used cheap fabrics
      myself in my early years in the SCA, but I am now a convert to using only
      period-correct fabrics, even if I have to scrimp and save to afford them and limit
      the number of garments I have. Competition is not and never has been a reason;
      I don't do competitions, ever. So, why?

      Because I have learned far more about life in the Middle Ages by sticking to
      the period options. I've learned why they made clothing the way they did and
      why they wore it the way they wore it and what it did for them. I've learned
      that clothing made to period patterns using the correct period materials is
      FAR more comfortable, long-wearing, and suited to our many camping events with
      their varying weather than any modern fabric could be.

      We've already talked about the comfort of natural fibers over synthetics.
      When you make it to proper period patterns, it's easier to put together,
      generally uses less fabric, and works better for active movement. My wool and linen
      tunics have lasted for many years - up to 10 in some cases - without needing
      repairs at all; when I was wearing polycotton and cotton gauze and old
      bedsheets I was constantly having to restitch seams that had come out and repair tears
      and wear holes. For hot events, linen cannot be beaten as a comfort fabric,
      and when it gets cold at night, or when you have a couple of days that are 50
      degrees and raining, a good wool tunic over the linen underdress will keep you
      comfortable and cozy warm and DRY for the most part. No need to run around
      in wet, clingy polycotton or see through gauze, wrapped in a cloak and
      shivering. Go about your business in a heavy wool tunic and hood and wool socks and
      you'll be comfortable all day long, without the cloak in your way. And
      certainly no need for plastic ponchos or trashbags over your clothes, as I've seen at
      any number of events.

      It makes sense that it should work that way; after all, medieval and
      renaissance people didn't have indoor climate control or modern waterproof materials
      (and wool works better than a rubberized or plastic raincoat anyway), and they
      lived far more in the weather than we do; most of us shuttle back and forth
      between our houses, offices, and cars and hardly are out in the weather. Why
      do we insist that they were always miserable in bad (or good, for that matter)
      weather? Because we make our "medieval" clothes out of the wrong stuff (stuff
      that was designed for use in climate-controlled conditions) and then complain
      when it doesn't keep us comfortable when we're out in real weather.

      I don't encourage people to use period fabric because they can win
      competitions by using it. I encourage its use because it is more practical for what
      we're doing in the long run. What good is having 10 outfits made of cheap fabric
      off the dollar-a-yard table and always going home complaining about how
      uncomfortable you were at the event and how many repairs you need to make, when you
      can have two made of the correct fabrics and be comfortable?

      And no, I don't dry clean my linen and wool outfits. The linen goes in the
      washer and dryer or hangs out to dry and the only thing I ever iron is my
      veils; the wool gets aired out and brushed off (something my 80+ year old neighbors
      still do with their own wool coats, skirts and suits) unless it really needs
      washed and then it goes in the washer in cold water and hangs to dry.


      Brangwayna Morgan
      Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
      Lancaster, PA


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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      Message: 4
      Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2004 15:59:21 -0000
      From: chemistbb3
      Subject: Re: Fabric questions

      Ya know, I do have to agree with this to a point.

      Yes the fabrics that were used in period do work very well for period
      clothes and they wear very well. They are suppose to since, in
      period, that is what the folks had and it had to. And yes the SCA is
      suppose to be educational, but isn't technique the more important
      thing? If A&S was limited to total authenticity, I doubt that we
      would see many entries. For example, how many costumers actually
      work with period fabric that is made as it was in period, with
      equipment made as it was in period?

      OK, I can afford the "correct" fabric, even at $50 per yard, (it may
      be the only fabric I buy for a couple of months though) but I am
      still not above buying good cotton fabric when I can find it on
      sale. Sorry, but I baulk at $10 a yard stuff (going price at my
      local fabric store for linen, if it is available.). I search the
      bargin tables, just like anyone else. Yes, I am going to bite the
      bullet and pay the bucks for linen and wool soon, but I will still
      make good ol' cotton tunics and hoods as well. They are comfortable,
      wear well, and quite frankly suit the purpose. Also, I know a number
      of folks that share The Dream that quite frankly have difficulty
      scraping up enough to pay gas to go to events and have to do without
      to pay gate. They have done marvelous things with bits and prices
      from yard sales, and quite frankly won a Frugal Garb contest or two.

      Yes, the period fabrics are good, but I would rather see my friends
      at an event in bedsheets than not at all...

      William
      (Who wonders where people are finding used sheets that are suitable
      for garb?)

      --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, bronwynmgn@a... wrote:
      > In a message dated 6/30/2004 2:22:58 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      > scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
      >
      > <> garment in Competition.>>
      >
      > <for
      > authentisity almost any fabric will do.>>
      >
      > Several people have made this comment in this thread, and it
      perturbs me.
      >
      > Is not the SCA an "educational" organization? Are we not supposed
      to be
      > educating people about the Middle Ages and Renaissance?
      >
      > I understand full well that it can be difficult and expensive to
      find some of
      > the fabrics used in period for garments, and that substitutions may
      well be
      > needed at times (silk velvet for Renaissance stuff, for example; if
      you can
      > find it, it's about $50/yard if you're really lucky). I've used
      cheap fabrics
      > myself in my early years in the SCA, but I am now a convert to
      using only
      > period-correct fabrics, even if I have to scrimp and save to afford
      them and limit
      > the number of garments I have. Competition is not and never has
      been a reason;
      > I don't do competitions, ever. So, why?
      >
      > Because I have learned far more about life in the Middle Ages by
      sticking to
      > the period options. I've learned why they made clothing the way
      they did and
      > why they wore it the way they wore it and what it did for them.
      I've learned
      > that clothing made to period patterns using the correct period
      materials is
      > FAR more comfortable, long-wearing, and suited to our many camping
      events with
      > their varying weather than any modern fabric could be.
      >
      > We've already talked about the comfort of natural fibers over
      synthetics.
      > When you make it to proper period patterns, it's easier to put
      together,
      > generally uses less fabric, and works better for active movement.
      My wool and linen
      > tunics have lasted for many years - up to 10 in some cases -
      without needing
      > repairs at all; when I was wearing polycotton and cotton gauze and
      old
      > bedsheets I was constantly having to restitch seams that had come
      out and repair tears
      > and wear holes. For hot events, linen cannot be beaten as a
      comfort fabric,
      > and when it gets cold at night, or when you have a couple of days
      that are 50
      > degrees and raining, a good wool tunic over the linen underdress
      will keep you
      > comfortable and cozy warm and DRY for the most part. No need to
      run around
      > in wet, clingy polycotton or see through gauze, wrapped in a cloak
      and
      > shivering. Go about your business in a heavy wool tunic and hood
      and wool socks and
      > you'll be comfortable all day long, without the cloak in your way.
      And
      > certainly no need for plastic ponchos or trashbags over your
      clothes, as I've seen at
      > any number of events.
      >
      > It makes sense that it should work that way; after all, medieval
      and
      > renaissance people didn't have indoor climate control or modern
      waterproof materials
      > (and wool works better than a rubberized or plastic raincoat
      anyway), and they
      > lived far more in the weather than we do; most of us shuttle back
      and forth
      > between our houses, offices, and cars and hardly are out in the
      weather. Why
      > do we insist that they were always miserable in bad (or good, for
      that matter)
      > weather? Because we make our "medieval" clothes out of the wrong
      stuff (stuff
      > that was designed for use in climate-controlled conditions) and
      then complain
      > when it doesn't keep us comfortable when we're out in real weather.
      >
      > I don't encourage people to use period fabric because they can win
      > competitions by using it. I encourage its use because it is more
      practical for what
      > we're doing in the long run. What good is having 10 outfits made
      of cheap fabric
      > off the dollar-a-yard table and always going home complaining about
      how
      > uncomfortable you were at the event and how many repairs you need
      to make, when you
      > can have two made of the correct fabrics and be comfortable?
      >
      > And no, I don't dry clean my linen and wool outfits. The linen
      goes in the
      > washer and dryer or hangs out to dry and the only thing I ever iron
      is my
      > veils; the wool gets aired out and brushed off (something my 80+
      year old neighbors
      > still do with their own wool coats, skirts and suits) unless it
      really needs
      > washed and then it goes in the washer in cold water and hangs to
      dry.
      >
      >
      > Brangwayna Morgan
      > Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
      > Lancaster, PA
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 5
      Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2004 08:45:41 -0700
      From: Kirianna
      Subject: Re: Fabric questions

      I agree....

      And, you can still learn about life in the Middle Ages while wearing
      cotton too!

      ~Kirianna

      tori T wrote:

      >I have a problem with this last message. some of the things said, yes were true. BUT there are people like myself who work full time just to be broke. And I'm not one of those people who buys wants over needs. Some times people have to use old bed sheets and dollar-a-yard fabric. I am proud to say I am one of them. I have never yet said "oh that dress was so uncomfortable" or "ugh, another repair I have to make". If you do these things corectly, you wont be uncomfortable or have to make repairs all the time. I just got done making another dress for myself and my dad said "thats an old sheet?!?". Yes it was and it is THE most comfortable, best looking dress I have made. So dont go ragging on people and saying it's wrong to use cheeper fabric and old sheets just because we cant all have money like you. if it's period (which cotton is) and it's comfortable and warm (my first dress and first event was made with cotton and I stayed way warm with 4 inches of snow on the ground with NO
      > cloak) then wear it!
      >
      >Antonia
      >
      >
      >
      >bronwynmgn@... wrote: In a message dated 6/30/2004 2:22:58 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      >scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
      >
      ><>garment in Competition.>>
      >
      ><>authentisity almost any fabric will do.>>
      >
      >Several people have made this comment in this thread, and it perturbs me.
      >
      >Is not the SCA an "educational" organization? Are we not supposed to be
      >educating people about the Middle Ages and Renaissance?
      >
      >I understand full well that it can be difficult and expensive to find some of
      >the fabrics used in period for garments, and that substitutions may well be
      >needed at times (silk velvet for Renaissance stuff, for example; if you can
      >find it, it's about $50/yard if you're really lucky). I've used cheap fabrics
      >myself in my early years in the SCA, but I am now a convert to using only
      >period-correct fabrics, even if I have to scrimp and save to afford them and limit
      >the number of garments I have. Competition is not and never has been a reason;
      >I don't do competitions, ever. So, why?
      >
      >Because I have learned far more about life in the Middle Ages by sticking to
      >the period options. I've learned why they made clothing the way they did and
      >why they wore it the way they wore it and what it did for them. I've learned
      >that clothing made to period patterns using the correct period materials is
      >FAR more comfortable, long-wearing, and suited to our many camping events with
      >their varying weather than any modern fabric could be.
      >
      >We've already talked about the comfort of natural fibers over synthetics.
      >When you make it to proper period patterns, it's easier to put together,
      >generally uses less fabric, and works better for active movement. My wool and linen
      >tunics have lasted for many years - up to 10 in some cases - without needing
      >repairs at all; when I was wearing polycotton and cotton gauze and old
      >bedsheets I was constantly having to restitch seams that had come out and repair tears
      >and wear holes. For hot events, linen cannot be beaten as a comfort fabric,
      >and when it gets cold at night, or when you have a couple of days that are 50
      >degrees and raining, a good wool tunic over the linen underdress will keep you
      >comfortable and cozy warm and DRY for the most part. No need to run around
      >in wet, clingy polycotton or see through gauze, wrapped in a cloak and
      >shivering. Go about your business in a heavy wool tunic and hood and wool socks and
      >you'll be comfortable all day long, without the cloak in your way. And
      >certainly no need for plastic ponchos or trashbags over your clothes, as I've seen at
      >any number of events.
      >
      >It makes sense that it should work that way; after all, medieval and
      >renaissance people didn't have indoor climate control or modern waterproof materials
      >(and wool works better than a rubberized or plastic raincoat anyway), and they
      >lived far more in the weather than we do; most of us shuttle back and forth
      >between our houses, offices, and cars and hardly are out in the weather. Why
      >do we insist that they were always miserable in bad (or good, for that matter)
      >weather? Because we make our "medieval" clothes out of the wrong stuff (stuff
      >that was designed for use in climate-controlled conditions) and then complain
      >when it doesn't keep us comfortable when we're out in real weather.
      >
      >I don't encourage people to use period fabric because they can win
      >competitions by using it. I encourage its use because it is more practical for what
      >we're doing in the long run. What good is having 10 outfits made of cheap fabric
      >off the dollar-a-yard table and always going home complaining about how
      >uncomfortable you were at the event and how many repairs you need to make, when you
      >can have two made of the correct fabrics and be comfortable?
      >
      >And no, I don't dry clean my linen and wool outfits. The linen goes in the
      >washer and dryer or hangs out to dry and the only thing I ever iron is my
      >veils; the wool gets aired out and brushed off (something my 80+ year old neighbors
      >still do with their own wool coats, skirts and suits) unless it really needs
      >washed and then it goes in the washer in cold water and hangs to dry.
      >
      >
      >Brangwayna Morgan
      >Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
      >Lancaster, PA
      >
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
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      --
      www.jackntracie.com
      Live, and learn...


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 6
      Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2004 09:34:56 -0700 (PDT)
      From: tori T
      Subject: Re: Fabric questions


      As far as finding used bed sheets suitable, most of the time I use my old bed sheets (I haven't used many but from my old twin bed and now in a queen). Sometimes I can find some at garage sales, but most of the time I would use the flat sheet cause not many people use them or really pay attention to them (most people I know let me refraise that). but not too often. Also you can find some at a nearby goodwill or anystore of the such. You could probably find some at an outlet store or any store like that with not much wrong with it that you can cut around.

      Antonia





      chemistbb3 wrote: Ya know, I do have to agree with this to a point.

      Yes the fabrics that were used in period do work very well for period
      clothes and they wear very well. They are suppose to since, in
      period, that is what the folks had and it had to. And yes the SCA is
      suppose to be educational, but isn't technique the more important
      thing? If A&S was limited to total authenticity, I doubt that we
      would see many entries. For example, how many costumers actually
      work with period fabric that is made as it was in period, with
      equipment made as it was in period?

      OK, I can afford the "correct" fabric, even at $50 per yard, (it may
      be the only fabric I buy for a couple of months though) but I am
      still not above buying good cotton fabric when I can find it on
      sale. Sorry, but I baulk at $10 a yard stuff (going price at my
      local fabric store for linen, if it is available.). I search the
      bargin tables, just like anyone else. Yes, I am going to bite the
      bullet and pay the bucks for linen and wool soon, but I will still
      make good ol' cotton tunics and hoods as well. They are comfortable,
      wear well, and quite frankly suit the purpose. Also, I know a number
      of folks that share The Dream that quite frankly have difficulty
      scraping up enough to pay gas to go to events and have to do without
      to pay gate. They have done marvelous things with bits and prices
      from yard sales, and quite frankly won a Frugal Garb contest or two.

      Yes, the period fabrics are good, but I would rather see my friends
      at an event in bedsheets than not at all...

      William
      (Who wonders where people are finding used sheets that are suitable
      for garb?)

      --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, bronwynmgn@a... wrote:
      > In a message dated 6/30/2004 2:22:58 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      > scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
      >
      > <> garment in Competition.>>
      >
      > <for
      > authentisity almost any fabric will do.>>
      >
      > Several people have made this comment in this thread, and it
      perturbs me.
      >
      > Is not the SCA an "educational" organization? Are we not supposed
      to be
      > educating people about the Middle Ages and Renaissance?
      >
      > I understand full well that it can be difficult and expensive to
      find some of
      > the fabrics used in period for garments, and that substitutions may
      well be
      > needed at times (silk velvet for Renaissance stuff, for example; if
      you can
      > find it, it's about $50/yard if you're really lucky). I've used
      cheap fabrics
      > myself in my early years in the SCA, but I am now a convert to
      using only
      > period-correct fabrics, even if I have to scrimp and save to afford
      them and limit
      > the number of garments I have. Competition is not and never has
      been a reason;
      > I don't do competitions, ever. So, why?
      >
      > Because I have learned far more about life in the Middle Ages by
      sticking to
      > the period options. I've learned why they made clothing the way
      they did and
      > why they wore it the way they wore it and what it did for them.
      I've learned
      > that clothing made to period patterns using the correct period
      materials is
      > FAR more comfortable, long-wearing, and suited to our many camping
      events with
      > their varying weather than any modern fabric could be.
      >
      > We've already talked about the comfort of natural fibers over
      synthetics.
      > When you make it to proper period patterns, it's easier to put
      together,
      > generally uses less fabric, and works better for active movement.
      My wool and linen
      > tunics have lasted for many years - up to 10 in some cases -
      without needing
      > repairs at all; when I was wearing polycotton and cotton gauze and
      old
      > bedsheets I was constantly having to restitch seams that had come
      out and repair tears
      > and wear holes. For hot events, linen cannot be beaten as a
      comfort fabric,
      > and when it gets cold at night, or when you have a couple of days
      that are 50
      > degrees and raining, a good wool tunic over the linen underdress
      will keep you
      > comfortable and cozy warm and DRY for the most part. No need to
      run around
      > in wet, clingy polycotton or see through gauze, wrapped in a cloak
      and
      > shivering. Go about your business in a heavy wool tunic and hood
      and wool socks and
      > you'll be comfortable all day long, without the cloak in your way.
      And
      > certainly no need for plastic ponchos or trashbags over your
      clothes, as I've seen at
      > any number of events.
      >
      > It makes sense that it should work that way; after all, medieval
      and
      > renaissance people didn't have indoor climate control or modern
      waterproof materials
      > (and wool works better than a rubberized or plastic raincoat
      anyway), and they
      > lived far more in the weather than we do; most of us shuttle back
      and forth
      > between our houses, offices, and cars and hardly are out in the
      weather. Why
      > do we insist that they were always miserable in bad (or good, for
      that matter)
      > weather? Because we make our "medieval" clothes out of the wrong
      stuff (stuff
      > that was designed for use in climate-controlled conditions) and
      then complain
      > when it doesn't keep us comfortable when we're out in real weather.
      >
      > I don't encourage people to use period fabric because they can win
      > competitions by using it. I encourage its use because it is more
      practical for what
      > we're doing in the long run. What good is having 10 outfits made
      of cheap fabric
      > off the dollar-a-yard table and always going home complaining about
      how
      > uncomfortable you were at the event and how many repairs you need
      to make, when you
      > can have two made of the correct fabrics and be comfortable?
      >
      > And no, I don't dry clean my linen and wool outfits. The linen
      goes in the
      > washer and dryer or hangs out to dry and the only thing I ever iron
      is my
      > veils; the wool gets aired out and brushed off (something my 80+
      year old neighbors
      > still do with their own wool coats, skirts and suits) unless it
      really needs
      > washed and then it goes in the washer in cold water and hangs to
      dry.
      >
      >
      > Brangwayna Morgan
      > Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
      > Lancaster, PA
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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      Message: 7
      Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2004 10:07:04 -0700
      From: Katie Pleasance
      Subject: Re: Fabric questions

      Huzzah for William! That's the attitude we newbies need to hear.

      Some of you old-timers need to remember: Intimidated Newbies Won't Be SCA
      Newbies For Long -- They Will Be Doing Something Other Than SCA.

      Katie


      >Yes, the period fabrics are good, but I would rather see my friends
      >at an event in bedsheets than not at all...
      >William
      >(Who wonders where people are finding used sheets that are suitable
      >for garb?)





      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 8
      Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2004 13:54:35 -0400 (EDT)
      From: Susan Farmer
      Subject: Re: Fabric questions

      And on the topic of "period fabrics ..."

      I thought the Authenticity Fabric Note was a tad over the top and
      I've played in the SCA on and off since there were only 4 kingdoms.

      The purpose of this particular group is to **encourage** newcomers,
      not *discourage* them.

      Jerusha in Meridies


      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 9
      Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2004 09:26:57 -0700
      From: Kirianna
      Subject: Re: Fabric questions

      (Who wonders where people are finding used sheets that are suitable

      Goodwill or second hand stores!

      ~Kiri


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 10
      Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2004 12:39:35 -0700
      From: "Tirloch O'Riordain"
      Subject: Re: Fabric questions



      bronwynmgn@... wrote:

      >
      > I understand full well that it can be difficult and expensive to find
      > some of
      > the fabrics used in period for garments, and that substitutions may
      > well be
      > needed at times (silk velvet for Renaissance stuff, for example; if
      > you can
      > find it, it's about $50/yard if you're really lucky). I've used cheap
      > fabrics
      > myself in my early years in the SCA, but I am now a convert to using only
      > period-correct fabrics, even if I have to scrimp and save to afford
      > them and limit
      > the number of garments I have. Competition is not and never has been
      > a reason;
      > I don't do competitions, ever. So, why?


      While I agree with your sentiment in spirit (I always think it a good
      thing to promote the authentic experience and to promote education), I
      do think that you are missing certain realities. You stated that you
      used cheap fabrics in your early years but now...

      What you are missing in this logic is that these people are in their
      early years, many of them are making a first attempt at garb. They are
      making now the same decisions that you made years ago. Some of them will
      find us a wonderful experience, others may not stick around. Your
      decision to switch to more period and expensive clothing is a decision
      made about a known future. You know that you will use these clothes. You
      know that you are going to be around in a year or two. While I hope that
      new people will find our group worthy of their spare time, that may not
      be a decision that they have made yet. That is the reason why our
      corpora states that the only requirement is that you make an 'attempt"
      at pre-seveteenth century clothing. We do not want to restrict them. We
      want them to come and to learn and to play. Maybe someday they will
      convert as you did, maybe they will not. There are many people for whom
      the SCA has become their premiere hobby, and they apply much of their
      free time and budget to it. There are many others however for whom it is
      a minor hobby, and they do not wish to dedicate much time or money to
      it. We have to understand this, and not apply our views to those people,
      but rather assist them at any level that they wish to commit to.

      Your Servant,

      Tirloch



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