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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Fabric questions

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  • Kirianna
    (Who wonders where people are finding used sheets that are suitable Goodwill or second hand stores! ~Kiri [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 22 , Jul 1, 2004
      (Who wonders where people are finding used sheets that are suitable

      Goodwill or second hand stores!

      ~Kiri


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tori T
      As far as finding used bed sheets suitable, most of the time I use my old bed sheets (I haven t used many but from my old twin bed and now in a queen).
      Message 2 of 22 , Jul 1, 2004
        As far as finding used bed sheets suitable, most of the time I use my old bed sheets (I haven't used many but from my old twin bed and now in a queen). Sometimes I can find some at garage sales, but most of the time I would use the flat sheet cause not many people use them or really pay attention to them (most people I know let me refraise that). but not too often. Also you can find some at a nearby goodwill or anystore of the such. You could probably find some at an outlet store or any store like that with not much wrong with it that you can cut around.

        Antonia





        chemistbb3 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote: Ya know, I do have to agree with this to a point.

        Yes the fabrics that were used in period do work very well for period
        clothes and they wear very well. They are suppose to since, in
        period, that is what the folks had and it had to. And yes the SCA is
        suppose to be educational, but isn't technique the more important
        thing? If A&S was limited to total authenticity, I doubt that we
        would see many entries. For example, how many costumers actually
        work with period fabric that is made as it was in period, with
        equipment made as it was in period?

        OK, I can afford the "correct" fabric, even at $50 per yard, (it may
        be the only fabric I buy for a couple of months though) but I am
        still not above buying good cotton fabric when I can find it on
        sale. Sorry, but I baulk at $10 a yard stuff (going price at my
        local fabric store for linen, if it is available.). I search the
        bargin tables, just like anyone else. Yes, I am going to bite the
        bullet and pay the bucks for linen and wool soon, but I will still
        make good ol' cotton tunics and hoods as well. They are comfortable,
        wear well, and quite frankly suit the purpose. Also, I know a number
        of folks that share The Dream that quite frankly have difficulty
        scraping up enough to pay gas to go to events and have to do without
        to pay gate. They have done marvelous things with bits and prices
        from yard sales, and quite frankly won a Frugal Garb contest or two.

        Yes, the period fabrics are good, but I would rather see my friends
        at an event in bedsheets than not at all...

        William
        (Who wonders where people are finding used sheets that are suitable
        for garb?)

        --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, bronwynmgn@a... wrote:
        > In a message dated 6/30/2004 2:22:58 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        > scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
        >
        > <<only worry about "periodness" of fabric if you're entering the
        > garment in Competition.>>
        >
        > <<As long as you are not going to try to put this in a competion
        for
        > authentisity almost any fabric will do.>>
        >
        > Several people have made this comment in this thread, and it
        perturbs me.
        >
        > Is not the SCA an "educational" organization? Are we not supposed
        to be
        > educating people about the Middle Ages and Renaissance?
        >
        > I understand full well that it can be difficult and expensive to
        find some of
        > the fabrics used in period for garments, and that substitutions may
        well be
        > needed at times (silk velvet for Renaissance stuff, for example; if
        you can
        > find it, it's about $50/yard if you're really lucky). I've used
        cheap fabrics
        > myself in my early years in the SCA, but I am now a convert to
        using only
        > period-correct fabrics, even if I have to scrimp and save to afford
        them and limit
        > the number of garments I have. Competition is not and never has
        been a reason;
        > I don't do competitions, ever. So, why?
        >
        > Because I have learned far more about life in the Middle Ages by
        sticking to
        > the period options. I've learned why they made clothing the way
        they did and
        > why they wore it the way they wore it and what it did for them.
        I've learned
        > that clothing made to period patterns using the correct period
        materials is
        > FAR more comfortable, long-wearing, and suited to our many camping
        events with
        > their varying weather than any modern fabric could be.
        >
        > We've already talked about the comfort of natural fibers over
        synthetics.
        > When you make it to proper period patterns, it's easier to put
        together,
        > generally uses less fabric, and works better for active movement.
        My wool and linen
        > tunics have lasted for many years - up to 10 in some cases -
        without needing
        > repairs at all; when I was wearing polycotton and cotton gauze and
        old
        > bedsheets I was constantly having to restitch seams that had come
        out and repair tears
        > and wear holes. For hot events, linen cannot be beaten as a
        comfort fabric,
        > and when it gets cold at night, or when you have a couple of days
        that are 50
        > degrees and raining, a good wool tunic over the linen underdress
        will keep you
        > comfortable and cozy warm and DRY for the most part. No need to
        run around
        > in wet, clingy polycotton or see through gauze, wrapped in a cloak
        and
        > shivering. Go about your business in a heavy wool tunic and hood
        and wool socks and
        > you'll be comfortable all day long, without the cloak in your way.
        And
        > certainly no need for plastic ponchos or trashbags over your
        clothes, as I've seen at
        > any number of events.
        >
        > It makes sense that it should work that way; after all, medieval
        and
        > renaissance people didn't have indoor climate control or modern
        waterproof materials
        > (and wool works better than a rubberized or plastic raincoat
        anyway), and they
        > lived far more in the weather than we do; most of us shuttle back
        and forth
        > between our houses, offices, and cars and hardly are out in the
        weather. Why
        > do we insist that they were always miserable in bad (or good, for
        that matter)
        > weather? Because we make our "medieval" clothes out of the wrong
        stuff (stuff
        > that was designed for use in climate-controlled conditions) and
        then complain
        > when it doesn't keep us comfortable when we're out in real weather.
        >
        > I don't encourage people to use period fabric because they can win
        > competitions by using it. I encourage its use because it is more
        practical for what
        > we're doing in the long run. What good is having 10 outfits made
        of cheap fabric
        > off the dollar-a-yard table and always going home complaining about
        how
        > uncomfortable you were at the event and how many repairs you need
        to make, when you
        > can have two made of the correct fabrics and be comfortable?
        >
        > And no, I don't dry clean my linen and wool outfits. The linen
        goes in the
        > washer and dryer or hangs out to dry and the only thing I ever iron
        is my
        > veils; the wool gets aired out and brushed off (something my 80+
        year old neighbors
        > still do with their own wool coats, skirts and suits) unless it
        really needs
        > washed and then it goes in the washer in cold water and hangs to
        dry.
        >
        >
        > Brangwayna Morgan
        > Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
        > Lancaster, PA
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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      • Katie Pleasance
        Huzzah for William! That s the attitude we newbies need to hear. Some of you old-timers need to remember: Intimidated Newbies Won t Be SCA Newbies For Long --
        Message 3 of 22 , Jul 1, 2004
          Huzzah for William! That's the attitude we newbies need to hear.

          Some of you old-timers need to remember: Intimidated Newbies Won't Be SCA
          Newbies For Long -- They Will Be Doing Something Other Than SCA.

          Katie


          >Yes, the period fabrics are good, but I would rather see my friends
          >at an event in bedsheets than not at all...
          >William
          >(Who wonders where people are finding used sheets that are suitable
          >for garb?)
        • Susan Farmer
          And on the topic of period fabrics ... I thought the Authenticity Fabric Note was a tad over the top and I ve played in the SCA on and off since there were
          Message 4 of 22 , Jul 1, 2004
            And on the topic of "period fabrics ..."

            I thought the Authenticity Fabric Note was a tad over the top and
            I've played in the SCA on and off since there were only 4 kingdoms.

            The purpose of this particular group is to **encourage** newcomers,
            not *discourage* them.

            Jerusha in Meridies
          • Tirloch O'Riordain
            ... While I agree with your sentiment in spirit (I always think it a good thing to promote the authentic experience and to promote education), I do think that
            Message 5 of 22 , Jul 1, 2004
              bronwynmgn@... wrote:

              >
              > I understand full well that it can be difficult and expensive to find
              > some of
              > the fabrics used in period for garments, and that substitutions may
              > well be
              > needed at times (silk velvet for Renaissance stuff, for example; if
              > you can
              > find it, it's about $50/yard if you're really lucky). I've used cheap
              > fabrics
              > myself in my early years in the SCA, but I am now a convert to using only
              > period-correct fabrics, even if I have to scrimp and save to afford
              > them and limit
              > the number of garments I have. Competition is not and never has been
              > a reason;
              > I don't do competitions, ever. So, why?


              While I agree with your sentiment in spirit (I always think it a good
              thing to promote the authentic experience and to promote education), I
              do think that you are missing certain realities. You stated that you
              used cheap fabrics in your early years but now...

              What you are missing in this logic is that these people are in their
              early years, many of them are making a first attempt at garb. They are
              making now the same decisions that you made years ago. Some of them will
              find us a wonderful experience, others may not stick around. Your
              decision to switch to more period and expensive clothing is a decision
              made about a known future. You know that you will use these clothes. You
              know that you are going to be around in a year or two. While I hope that
              new people will find our group worthy of their spare time, that may not
              be a decision that they have made yet. That is the reason why our
              corpora states that the only requirement is that you make an 'attempt"
              at pre-seveteenth century clothing. We do not want to restrict them. We
              want them to come and to learn and to play. Maybe someday they will
              convert as you did, maybe they will not. There are many people for whom
              the SCA has become their premiere hobby, and they apply much of their
              free time and budget to it. There are many others however for whom it is
              a minor hobby, and they do not wish to dedicate much time or money to
              it. We have to understand this, and not apply our views to those people,
              but rather assist them at any level that they wish to commit to.

              Your Servant,

              Tirloch
            • bronwynmgn@aol.com
              In a message dated 7/1/2004 3:55:19 PM Eastern Standard Time, scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
              Message 6 of 22 , Jul 1, 2004
                In a message dated 7/1/2004 3:55:19 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:

                <<So dont go ragging on people and saying it's wrong to use cheeper fabric
                and old sheets just because we cant all have money like you. >>

                I was not ragging on people who have to use cheap fabric if they want garb at
                all, nor on people who choose to use cheap fabric because they want to spend
                their money on other things, like period musical instruments, armor, or a
                flat-screen TV - or even the rent on their apartment or food for their kids. Nor
                did I say it was "wrong" to use cheap fabrics - I said I found it better to
                use period ones. Saying one thing is better does not mean the other thing is
                "wrong". I'm not rolling in money, contrary to your opinion - one paycheck a
                month pays my mortgage, and all but about $200 of the other one goes to pay
                other bills. Most of that $200 a month goes for gas, food, mundane clothes (which
                I wear until they fall apart, regardless of changing fashions), and taking
                care of my cats. I still choose to use some of that money, spent wisely, to
                buy period fabrics for my garb.

                I was responding to the people who insist that the only reason to consider
                using period fabrics is if you want to win competitions. I gave a variety of
                reasons why I have found saving my money for period fabrics to be more practical
                and a better use of the money I do have. Your mileage may vary, of course,
                and you are certainly free to choose to spend your money where you will, and to
                wear what you like. I simply tried to present an alternative and far more
                practical argument to competitions as a reason to use period fabrics, and got
                attacked for it.


                Brangwayna Morgan
                Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
                Lancaster, PA


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • chemistbb3
                Ahhhhh, Then what we had here was a failya to communicate... Now your earlier post makes better sense to me! I have always liked the sound advice you have
                Message 7 of 22 , Jul 1, 2004
                  Ahhhhh,
                  Then what we had here was a failya to communicate...

                  Now your earlier post makes better sense to me!

                  I have always liked the sound advice you have always given and the
                  way your earlier post read to me was a bit of a shock. I'M glad that
                  is cleared up to me!

                  Williamk

                  --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, bronwynmgn@a... wrote:
                  > In a message dated 7/1/2004 3:55:19 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                  > scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
                  >
                  > <<So dont go ragging on people and saying it's wrong to use cheeper
                  fabric
                  > and old sheets just because we cant all have money like you. >>
                  >
                  > I was not ragging on people who have to use cheap fabric if they
                  want garb at
                  > all, nor on people who choose to use cheap fabric because they want
                  to spend
                  > their money on other things, like period musical instruments,
                  armor, or a
                  > flat-screen TV - or even the rent on their apartment or food for
                  their kids. Nor
                  > did I say it was "wrong" to use cheap fabrics - I said I found it
                  better to
                  > use period ones. Saying one thing is better does not mean the
                  other thing is
                  > "wrong". I'm not rolling in money, contrary to your opinion - one
                  paycheck a
                  > month pays my mortgage, and all but about $200 of the other one
                  goes to pay
                  > other bills. Most of that $200 a month goes for gas, food, mundane
                  clothes (which
                  > I wear until they fall apart, regardless of changing fashions), and
                  taking
                  > care of my cats. I still choose to use some of that money, spent
                  wisely, to
                  > buy period fabrics for my garb.
                  >
                  > I was responding to the people who insist that the only reason to
                  consider
                  > using period fabrics is if you want to win competitions. I gave a
                  variety of
                  > reasons why I have found saving my money for period fabrics to be
                  more practical
                  > and a better use of the money I do have. Your mileage may vary, of
                  course,
                  > and you are certainly free to choose to spend your money where you
                  will, and to
                  > wear what you like. I simply tried to present an alternative and
                  far more
                  > practical argument to competitions as a reason to use period
                  fabrics, and got
                  > attacked for it.
                  >
                  >
                  > Brangwayna Morgan
                  > Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
                  > Lancaster, PA
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Mackenzie
                  ... The way you guys are talking, you make it sound as if cotton wasn t period! Cotton is perfectly period, especially if you re from the Orient, Middle East,
                  Message 8 of 22 , Jul 1, 2004
                    --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Kirianna <kitani@c...> wrote:
                    > I agree....
                    >
                    > And, you can still learn about life in the Middle Ages while wearing
                    > cotton too!


                    The way you guys are talking, you make it sound as if cotton wasn't
                    period! Cotton is perfectly period, especially if you're from the
                    Orient, Middle East, Byzantium, Italy, or Egypt. It was available in
                    all of those areas for anyone of merchant class or higher. Lower
                    classes than that in Egypt, slightly east of Middle East, and Orient.
                    The nobility (as long as they weren't very low, poor nobility) could
                    afford it in France. England's about the only place where you would
                    need a royal connection to own cotton (the S&H was too high! LOL).

                    I suggest you guys take a visit over to SCA_Normans. Kirsten has tons
                    of information on linen and wool and her arguments about how cotton is
                    very period (Kirsten is a merchant with plenty of experience).
                  • Terrie B.
                    Oh dear. I seemed to have stirred up the pot. I truly apologize if I my question has caused any disturbances. My thanks to all who replied! I do value your
                    Message 9 of 22 , Jul 3, 2004
                      Oh dear. I seemed to have stirred up the pot. I truly apologize if I
                      my question has caused any disturbances. My thanks to all who replied!
                      I do value your input!


                      Not quite scared away,

                      T
                    • Tirloch O'Riordain
                      ... Greetings, You stirred nothing up dear Lady... you but asked a simple question. As in all large organizations, occasionally different subjects will strike
                      Message 10 of 22 , Jul 3, 2004
                        Terrie B. wrote:

                        > Oh dear. I seemed to have stirred up the pot. I truly apologize if I
                        > my question has caused any disturbances. My thanks to all who replied!
                        > I do value your input!
                        >
                        >
                        > Not quite scared away,
                        >
                        > T


                        Greetings,

                        You stirred nothing up dear Lady... you but asked a simple question.
                        As in all large organizations, occasionally different subjects will
                        strike cords with certain people, which often brings out more of an
                        emotional response than they may wish. I am sad that such a discussion
                        would take place on this list, but please take no fault of it upon
                        yourself. If nothing else, you were given a good indicator of the many
                        different views people have about costuming in the SCA, and therefore
                        you have a good starting point from which to make up your own mind on
                        what appeals to you.

                        I hope that you find the SCA to be a rewarding pastime, as so many of us
                        have.

                        Your Servant,

                        Tirloch
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