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Re: [SCA Newcomers] surname help

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  • Britt
    You are indeed in luck. Now a herald in our group may know what paper work needs to be included to register your name but I will start you off. Both parts of
    Message 1 of 9 , May 11, 2004
      You are indeed in luck. Now a herald in our group may know what paper work needs
      to be included to register your name but I will start you off. Both parts of your name
      can be autenticated. I'll start you on what I have come accross
      . Bidget- The
      Ashmolean Museum's brass rubbing collection Pre 1600- Gloucestershire, 1552,
      Kent, Middlesex

      Clutterbooke- King's Stanley, Gloucestershire-Parish registers-Marriages
      Richard Ar'nedell to Anne Clutterbooke Feb 7, 1576

      You don't need to find the name used in full just the parts that make up the name
      Hope this helps.

      Mary of the Stuwes




      > Since I have problems deciding between English and some kind of
      > lowland persona I've decided to come up with a persona that lets me
      > switch back and forth a bit. I've decided on Clutterbooke as a
      > surname(with some help), and I really want Bridget but I can't find
      > any examples. You mentioned that it could be a Danish name and I was
      > wondering if you (or anyone else) had any examples.
      >
      > Thank you
      > Sarah/hopefully Bridget Clutterbooke
    • bridgetthestargazer
      Edward IV had a daughter named Bridget. Born in 1480. Died in 1517. She was a nun in Dartford, Kent. Bridget is listed in Withycombe s book on names, page 54
      Message 2 of 9 , May 12, 2004
        Edward IV had a daughter named Bridget. Born in 1480. Died in 1517.
        She was a nun in Dartford, Kent.

        "Bridget" is listed in Withycombe's book on names, page 54 in the
        edition I looked at(if there are multiple editions, I can't tell you
        which one I looked at as I didn't have the change for more copies at
        the library that day and haven't gotten back there since). It says
        that the name didn't seem to come into "common use" until the 17th or
        18th century.

        That's what I've found so far in my own search.

        Bridget the Stargazer
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