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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Feast gear questions

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  • bronwynmgn@aol.com
    In a message dated 4/12/2004 1:13:28 PM Eastern Standard Time, scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 12, 2004
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      In a message dated 4/12/2004 1:13:28 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:

      <<I've been looking at various SCA guides for newbies about feastware. In
      many of them they suggest wooden or metal plates. I've looked around at the
      various sites which list such things for sale and it looks like this can be a
      rather expensive purchase to gather all the items together. I have also searched
      various thrift and antique stores and though they do tend to carry pewter
      tankards and some really neato 'steins' with covers on them and tin/aluminum plates
      or beverage containers...I worry very much about lead and other things
      associated with using the metal items. Wooden plates tend to be not found at all, or
      else they are in the shops like Pier One with giant signs saying 'NOT FOR FOOD
      CONSUMPTION - MIGHT POISON FOOD'. Apparently those sorts of plates are only
      for decoration when putting other plates on top!>>

      Most newcomer sites recommend wood or metal because they are less likely to
      break :-)
      Aluminum should be fine, or you can look for "pewter" pieces that have
      "Wilton" or Armetale" on the bottom - these are no-lead pewter replicas - although
      you will have a big problem with heat transfers, ie your hot drink will make
      the mug so hot you can't touch it, and your plate will get hot while your food
      cools off very quickly. On the other hand, some wooden items have a wax-like
      coating that will melt off with hot things, and cause leaks.
      I've seen people use wooden cutting boards for plates - mostly the round
      "cheese boards". Since they are sold as food utensils, they are food-safe. Same
      thing with wooden salad bowls - and I must admit that I've never noticed any
      problems with my thrift sale purchases.
      Also, once you start attending events, you will find that there are both
      basic merchants who sell simple feast gear and specialty merchants who sell
      reproduction work, so you'll have an option to get things that way.
      Of course, there is always the period trencher option - a piece of stale
      bread used for a plate. I make a very basic wheat bread (wheat, water, salt,
      yeast) in my bread machine on the Wednesday before the event, cut it into
      trenchers, and leave them out to dry. That way you just throw your plate away ;-)
      I've also heard of people using those little Boboli pizza crusts for this
      purpose. This DOES NOT, however, work well for feasts served buffet style!


      <<So then I went to some art history links and found pictures of typical
      glassware for cups, ceramics for plates etc. Those of course I can find in
      abundance at thrift stores, dollar stores and other discount stores not to mention
      mainstream stores. So are there any suggestions on what 'style' to buy of
      ceramic/glass? >>

      If you've settled on a time period and culture for your persona, use the art
      history links to look at glassware and ceramics, and see if you can find
      anything that looks like those. Otherwise, just pick any SCA time period, probably
      best from Western Europe, and look for items there. You may have trouble,
      however, as some of the more typical forms can be difficult to find mundanely.



      <<One thing that tends to bug me alot about spending very much on the
      feastware is, what if it gets broken/stolen/lost? Would I cry because of the amount
      of cash forked over for the items? Can it be replaced easily? So this is why
      I'm trying to find things that would at least 'pass' at a feast or camp
      situation but that wouldn't break the bank or be hard to replace. >>

      I've heard of people's feast gear getting misplaced or accidentally left
      behind - we took home a friend's feast box one time when we realized he'd left it
      at the site - and there are some types of items which are very common so it's
      very possible to pick up the wrong one thinking it is yours, but it's pretty
      rare for anything to be deliberately stolen at SCA events - and if it is, it's
      usually cash or jewelry, not feast gear. Mark your items on the bottom with a
      dremel or an indelible marker and that will help with the misidentification
      problem. Also, most groups hosting events collect any lost and found after the
      event and post a list on the relevant kingdom newsgroup, or you can contact
      the autocrat of the event to ask if something you are missing was picked up.
      Usually arrangements can be made either to pick it up at another event or to
      have it shipped to you.

      <<One note, I did manage to find some wooden forks and spoons imported from
      Thailand, they are very cute and tiny! But apparently that's the size they are
      made for eating with. They also seem rather fragile but they are very cheap.>>

      Metal spoons with a shallow pear-shaped bowl and a thin round handle are
      period, as are horn spoons and horn cups. Period table knives look much like a
      modern non-serrated steak knife with a wooden handle. For much of the SCA
      period, forks were used as kitchen tools rather than eating utensils, but it does
      take a bit of time to get used to eating without one.
      For an example of some replica eating utensils, try these sites:
      For cutlery:
      http://www.historicenterprises.com/cart.php?m=product_list&c=32

      For some spoons:
      http://www.historicenterprises.com/cart.php?m=product_list&c=34 A nice horn
      spoon
      http://www.pewterreplicas.co.uk/ Click on spoons on the menu on the left.
      Nice selection of period styles.

      For pottery mugs and such:
      http://www.historicenterprises.com/cart.php?skip=0&m=product_list&c=39

      There are lots of other merchants, thses are just ones I happened to have in
      my bookmarks.


      Brangwayna Morgan
      Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
      Lancaster, PA


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • amazonalys
      Wanted to add, if you are worried about lead in pewter, buy Wilton pewter, it is lead free and common. You should be able to find wilton pewter plates fairly
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 12, 2004
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        Wanted to add, if you are worried about lead in pewter, buy Wilton
        pewter, it is lead free and common. You should be able to find
        wilton pewter plates fairly easily on ebay, as well as goblets and
        mugs. Also, you can find decently-priced silver or silver-plate
        goblets on ebay. If you are looking for feast gear for only 1 or 2
        people, try doing an ebay search for feast gear. You'd be surprised
        how many people sell theirs in complete sets when they stop playing
        or just get new.

        No, I don't work for ebay - just live there.

        Lilion
      • Dan Baker
        ok, heres the big secret. If you can t afford what you want, do what you can afford. (Takes a big step onto soapbox) So you use modern plates and silverware
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 12, 2004
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          ok, heres the big secret. If you can't afford what you want, do what you
          can afford.

          (Takes a big step onto soapbox)

          So you use modern plates and silverware for a few years, so what. If an
          Authenticity Nazi bothers you tell him you will be happy to use athentic
          period style stuff, and then ask him when he wil be delivering them to
          you... That usually shuts them up. You do NOT need a full period kit to
          eat a feast, nor do you need to have a pavilion to camp at an event, even
          Pennsic. I have been around since the early 80s and I don't have everything
          I would like to have. Mostly because I keep adding to the list of "gotta
          haves". Work on athenticity in your own time and within your own buget,
          whether it be your feast gear, tentage, clothes, whatever. This is a hobby!
          Yes, it does tend to take over your life a bit. But it's still just a
          hobby.

          (Jumping off the soapbox to avoid the rotten tomatoes people are probably
          throwing at me)

          Now, some ideas on where to find stuff.

          Thrift stores such as Salvation Army, Goodwill, etc are excellent sources of
          wood plates and bowls, but you have to be there at the right time and place.
          Try stopping every weekend, or two for a while.

          Specialty stores such as World Market, Bad, Bath and Beyond, Pier One do
          often sell wood plates and such, but you gotta look in the dinner plate
          areas, not in the decoration areas. Decorative plates are usually not for
          consumption.

          Event Merchants often have new or used feast gear. (that they get from
          Goodwill, etc) We have one merchant that specializes in used mismatched
          gear.

          Other Scadians often upgrade or get rid of excess gear, sometimes they
          donate it to auctions (we usually do) Sometimes you can barter for it. (you
          make me a nice tunic and I will give you this nice set of feast gear. Last
          year I traded a wood chest (custiom made) for a viking a-frame pavilion for
          the kids.

          Online stores have excellent merchandise, maybe a little more expensive, but
          probably the best selections. And is almost always foodsafe.
          http://www.jastown.com/pewter/pewter.htm
          http://www.jastown.com/eating/eating.htm
          http://www.smoke-fire.com/copperware-1.asp
          http://www.smoke-fire.com/pottery-1.asp
          http://www.cumberlandgeneral.com/AB1257/webpage.cfm?WebPage_ID=1&DID=6
          http://www.pillagedvillage.com/pvonline/scan/st=db/co=yes/sf=category/se=Wooden/op=rm/se=1/sf=inactive/op=ne.html?id=5Ysceudx




          --
          In service to the dream,

          Lord Rhys, Capten gen y Arian Lloer
          Privateer to the Midrealm

          Arafu at dawnsio mewn adlaw
          (Take time to dance in the rain)

          Cymru am byth ("Wales Forever")




          >From: "L. Connally" <kkordas@...>
          >Reply-To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
          >To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Feast gear questions
          >Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 17:32:38 -0700 (PDT)
          >
          >
          >I've been looking at various SCA guides for newbies about feastware. In
          many of them they suggest wooden or metal plates. I've looked around at the
          various sites which list such things for sale and it looks like this can be
          a rather expensive purchase to gather all the items together. I have also
          searched various thrift and antique stores and though they do tend to carry
          pewter tankards and some really neato 'steins' with covers on them and
          tin/aluminum plates or beverage containers...I worry very much about lead
          and other things associated with using the metal items. Wooden plates tend
          to be not found at all, or else they are in the shops like Pier One with
          giant signs saying 'NOT FOR FOOD CONSUMPTION - MIGHT POISON FOOD'.
          Apparently those sorts of plates are only for decoration when putting other
          plates on top!
          >
          >So then I went to some art history links and found pictures of typical
          glassware for cups, ceramics for plates etc. Those of course I can find in
          abundance at thrift stores, dollar stores and other discount stores not to
          mention mainstream stores. So are there any suggestions on what 'style' to
          buy of ceramic/glass?
          >
          >
          >
          >One thing that tends to bug me alot about spending very much on the
          feastware is, what if it gets broken/stolen/lost? Would I cry because of the
          amount of cash forked over for the items? Can it be replaced easily? So this
          is why I'm trying to find things that would at least 'pass' at a feast or
          camp situation but that wouldn't break the bank or be hard to replace.
          >
          >One note, I did manage to find some wooden forks and spoons imported
          from Thailand, they are very cute and tiny! But apparently that's the size
          they are made for eating with. They also seem rather fragile but they are
          very cheap.
          >
          >
          >
          >Any suggestions would be appreciated!
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >"Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime
          rates in the country,"
          >--Mayor Marion Barry, Washington, DC.
          >
          >---------------------------------
          >Do you Yahoo!?
          >Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >

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        • Rhys
          Another suggestion for feast gear. If you have found some bowls or plates you like that are made of wood. Look at the finish on them. If it s cracked, varnish
          Message 4 of 4 , May 2, 2004
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            Another suggestion for feast gear.

            If you have found some bowls or plates you like that are made of wood. Look
            at the finish on them.
            If it's cracked, varnish or wax your best bet is to remove it. I have a few
            wooden bowls I have dealt
            with this issue by taking time, sometimes painstakingly long, sanding off
            the finish with gradually smaller
            grit size sandpaper until I have a clean and nearly polished wood finish.
            After doing this heat your item
            in the oven at 250 for an hour or so. Take it out and rub it down with
            cooking oil of some kind, I use
            canola oil because it makes the bowl smell like popcorn! :-)

            Put it back into the oven and bake the oil in, or if you're in a sunny zone
            you can leave it in the sun for
            a day. Wipe off the excess oil and let dry. Not only will you have a good
            looking bowl, but it will be
            waterproofed with a finish you don't have to worry about cutting through.
            If you do? Add some oil
            and reheat. If it's really bad, sand again and oil. Works great and always
            gets a laugh or raised eye
            brow from a cook when I ask "May I borrow your oven? I need to bake my
            bowl!"

            Lord Rhys Aiden Bifjord
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