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Feast gear questions

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  • L. Connally
    I ve been looking at various SCA guides for newbies about feastware. In many of them they suggest wooden or metal plates. I ve looked around at the various
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 10 5:32 PM
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      I've been looking at various SCA guides for newbies about feastware. In many of them they suggest wooden or metal plates. I've looked around at the various sites which list such things for sale and it looks like this can be a rather expensive purchase to gather all the items together. I have also searched various thrift and antique stores and though they do tend to carry pewter tankards and some really neato 'steins' with covers on them and tin/aluminum plates or beverage containers...I worry very much about lead and other things associated with using the metal items. Wooden plates tend to be not found at all, or else they are in the shops like Pier One with giant signs saying 'NOT FOR FOOD CONSUMPTION - MIGHT POISON FOOD'. Apparently those sorts of plates are only for decoration when putting other plates on top!

      So then I went to some art history links and found pictures of typical glassware for cups, ceramics for plates etc. Those of course I can find in abundance at thrift stores, dollar stores and other discount stores not to mention mainstream stores. So are there any suggestions on what 'style' to buy of ceramic/glass?



      One thing that tends to bug me alot about spending very much on the feastware is, what if it gets broken/stolen/lost? Would I cry because of the amount of cash forked over for the items? Can it be replaced easily? So this is why I'm trying to find things that would at least 'pass' at a feast or camp situation but that wouldn't break the bank or be hard to replace.

      One note, I did manage to find some wooden forks and spoons imported from Thailand, they are very cute and tiny! But apparently that's the size they are made for eating with. They also seem rather fragile but they are very cheap.



      Any suggestions would be appreciated!







      "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
      --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington, DC.

      ---------------------------------
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      Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • amazonalys
      I m the first one to admit my feast gear isn t authentic, but I d say it s as good as most I ve seen. I originally got some plates and wooden salad bowls from
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 12 11:14 AM
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        I'm the first one to admit my feast gear isn't authentic, but I'd say
        it's as good as most I've seen.

        I originally got some plates and wooden salad bowls from a Goodwill.
        Plates are hard to find and mine were actually serving dishes. Bowls
        are easiear to find than plates and are really easy to find on Ebay.
        I love Ebay - lots of good stuff there. Do a search for "wooden
        dishes" or "monkey pod" which is a type of wood used for dishes. I
        recently bought monkey pod plates from
        <http://www.islandwoods.com/plates_1.html> They're a bit pricy at
        $10.00 per plate, but that's cheaper than I've found anywhere else,
        even at events, and shipping is free if you order $40 worth.

        Pewter, safe for food use, is also easily found on ebay. I have
        goblets and tankards from there.

        As for flatware, I bought mine from The Olive Garden - that's right,
        the restaurant. I really liked their heavy knives and forks, with
        three tines...asked the waitess if she could give me the name of
        their supplier, or even sell me some. Paid $1.00 each piece for
        knives, forks and soup spoons.

        Lilion

        --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "L. Connally" <kkordas@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I've been looking at various SCA guides for newbies about
        feastware. In many of them they suggest wooden or metal plates. I've
        looked around at the various sites which list such things for sale
        and it looks like this can be a rather expensive purchase to gather
        all the items together. I have also searched various thrift and
        antique stores and though they do tend to carry pewter tankards and
        some really neato 'steins' with covers on them and tin/aluminum
        plates or beverage containers...I worry very much about lead and
        other things associated with using the metal items. Wooden plates
        tend to be not found at all, or else they are in the shops like Pier
        One with giant signs saying 'NOT FOR FOOD CONSUMPTION - MIGHT POISON
        FOOD'. Apparently those sorts of plates are only for decoration when
        putting other plates on top!
        >
        > So then I went to some art history links and found pictures of
        typical glassware for cups, ceramics for plates etc. Those of course
        I can find in abundance at thrift stores, dollar stores and other
        discount stores not to mention mainstream stores. So are there any
        suggestions on what 'style' to buy of ceramic/glass?
        >
        >
        >
        > One thing that tends to bug me alot about spending very much on the
        feastware is, what if it gets broken/stolen/lost? Would I cry because
        of the amount of cash forked over for the items? Can it be replaced
        easily? So this is why I'm trying to find things that would at
        least 'pass' at a feast or camp situation but that wouldn't break the
        bank or be hard to replace.
        >
        > One note, I did manage to find some wooden forks and spoons
        imported from Thailand, they are very cute and tiny! But apparently
        that's the size they are made for eating with. They also seem rather
        fragile but they are very cheap.
        >
        >
        >
        > Any suggestions would be appreciated!
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime
        rates in the country,"
        > --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington, DC.
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Do you Yahoo!?
        > Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • mekilno
        Wooden bowls and plates are the best to use (especially if your persona is from quite early)and my advice is two words. Charity shops. It may take a bit of
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 12 11:43 AM
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          Wooden bowls and plates are the best to use (especially if your
          persona is from quite early)and my advice is two words. Charity
          shops. It may take a bit of scouring, but you will eventually find
          what you need, I promise! ALL my feast gear came from charity shops
          around york - from a wooden bowl (quick cheat - use a chopping board
          for a plate!)to plain forks (which I have to say I'm ditching because
          I've just found my penknife at home! FInally!!) and even a white
          (china) tankard! Honestly, you can get anything at charity shops.
          Plus, it's cheap, so if it does get lost/stolen/broken, what's it
          matter? I paid two pounds for my bowl! As for style, it depends on
          your persono, but try to go for either rough pottery, of get a
          tankard - mine's white china, as I said. OK, so china's not great,
          but it does the job, and it'll pass at feast. Either go for pewter
          (not brilliant, beacause it doues tend to taint the stuff you wave in
          it, and it can taste odd) or rough pottery.
        • chemistbb3
          A quick work of warning. Real pewter is NOT a good choice for feast gear. Real pewter is made with lead, and you can run into it at resale shops. At resale
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 12 3:11 PM
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            A quick work of warning.

            Real pewter is NOT a good choice for feast gear. Real pewter is made
            with lead, and you can run into it at resale shops. At resale shops
            make sure the wooden stuff you are getting is not made for decorative
            purposes only. The finishes on some of the imported decorative
            wooden stuff can also be suspect for food use.

            William

            --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "mekilno" <mekilno@y...> wrote:
            > Wooden bowls and plates are the best to use (especially if your
            > persona is from quite early)and my advice is two words. Charity
            > shops. It may take a bit of scouring, but you will eventually find
            > what you need, I promise! ALL my feast gear came from charity
            shops
            > around york - from a wooden bowl (quick cheat - use a chopping
            board
            > for a plate!)to plain forks (which I have to say I'm ditching
            because
            > I've just found my penknife at home! FInally!!) and even a white
            > (china) tankard! Honestly, you can get anything at charity shops.
            > Plus, it's cheap, so if it does get lost/stolen/broken, what's it
            > matter? I paid two pounds for my bowl! As for style, it depends
            on
            > your persono, but try to go for either rough pottery, of get a
            > tankard - mine's white china, as I said. OK, so china's not great,
            > but it does the job, and it'll pass at feast. Either go for pewter
            > (not brilliant, beacause it doues tend to taint the stuff you wave
            in
            > it, and it can taste odd) or rough pottery.
          • mekilno
            I agree with William - I should have made that a bit clearer - make sure the wooden bowls are suitable for eating from! The ones I got were, but I did come
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 13 1:19 PM
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              I agree with William - I should have made that a bit clearer - make
              sure the wooden bowls are suitable for eating from! The ones I got
              were, but I did come across plenty that were varnished etc. Just
              keep your eye out for some basic, wooden, plain eating bowls.
              Pewter's ok, as long as you go for the stuff that's advertised as
              suitable for consumption, but it can be dangerous, and expensive. My
              advice is to steer away from pewter - like I said, my tankard's made
              from china, and I had a plain mug before that, made from rough
              pottery. If you're really stuck, do a quick cheat like I did - I
              used a round wooden chopping board as a plate for my first feast.
              Beg around as well, if you're really stuck. Someone is bound to have
              a spare bowl for you to borrow at a feast, until you get your own -
              as long as you wash it up, that is! lol Cutlery - modern stuff is
              acceptable in the SCA, as long as it's plain, so don't worry about
              getting wooden stuff - remember, knives came before forks, so if you
              really want. buy a small camping knife (if you can find one...) and
              use that. Otherwise, a small knife'd do. And as was said before,
              it's a hobby! I'm constantly on the prowl for better stuff, but it's
              not essential.

              Everild the Clumsy.

              Really happy because she's finally sent off her fighting waiver and
              it should be coming through soon.....
            • pooklaroux
              My experience with ceramics is that they can be heavy and they can break -- same with glasswear, So I only buy cheapie ceramics and glassware that I won t feel
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 13 1:21 PM
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                My experience with ceramics is that they can be heavy and they
                can break -- same with glasswear, So I only buy cheapie
                ceramics and glassware that I won't feel too bad about if the
                worst happens. I have "disguised" marginal glasswear and
                bowls with twine/rope wrapped and glued, and masking tape
                "leather" work. This tends to make some items hard to clean, but
                if you pick really cheapie stuff, and you only decorate it as much
                as you need to pass muster in daylight, you will be fine. Actually I
                did this with flatwear, too, except I used paste and kind of tied on
                the twine, so I could unwrap it and wash it later. You're looking at
                historical examples, so you will make good decisions. Trust
                yourself. Wooden dishes can be hard to take care of. Best
                "wooden" piece I ever owned was a fake wood salad bowl from a
                food service outlet. Made of some composite and though it
                looked great it could still go through the dishwasher. Great buy
                IMHO!

                You can really improve the look of your feastgear with nice
                napkins and baskets and things like that. Nice table linens go a
                long way toward disguising other pieces. And don't feel you have
                to buy all your table linens at Pier One. This is where the scrap
                bins at JoAnn's will come in handy! Placemats and napkins are
                super easy.

                Pook -- who used to eat with her fingers.


                --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "L. Connally"
                <kkordas@y...> wrote:
                >
                > I've been looking at various SCA guides for newbies about
                feastware. In many of them they suggest wooden or metal
                plates.
                > So then I went to some art history links and found pictures of
                typical glassware for cups, ceramics for plates etc. Those of
                course I can find in abundance at thrift stores, dollar stores and
                other discount stores not to mention mainstream stores. So are
                there any suggestions on what 'style' to buy of ceramic/glass?

                Would I cry because of the amount of cash forked over for the
                items? Can it be replaced easily? So this is why I'm trying to find
                things that would at least 'pass' at a feast or camp situation but
                that wouldn't break the bank or be hard to replace.
              • David and Stephanie Beynon
                ... like pewter. It is FDA approved for eating, unbreakable, and looks very nice. I got mine on eBay for a reasonable price.You can search under pewter
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 14 3:12 PM
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                  ---You might consider Wilton Armetale, which is an alloy that looks
                  like pewter. It is FDA approved for eating, unbreakable, and looks
                  very nice. I got mine on eBay for a reasonable price.You can search
                  under "pewter plates", "feastgear". Be sure to ask the seller if it
                  is Armetale, if it is not stated. You can also get it from medieval
                  merchants and other sources.Sometimes, you can also find it at yard
                  sales, church fairs, etc.

                  Juliana de Kent


                  In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "L. Connally" <kkordas@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I've been looking at various SCA guides for newbies about
                  feastware. In many of them they suggest wooden or metal plates. I've
                  looked around at the various sites which list such things for sale
                  and it looks like this can be a rather expensive purchase to gather
                  all the items together. I have also searched various thrift and
                  antique stores and though they do tend to carry pewter tankards and
                  some really neato 'steins' with covers on them and tin/aluminum
                  plates or beverage containers...I worry very much about lead and
                  other things associated with using the metal items. Wooden plates
                  tend to be not found at all, or else they are in the shops like Pier
                  One with giant signs saying 'NOT FOR FOOD CONSUMPTION - MIGHT POISON
                  FOOD'. Apparently those sorts of plates are only for decoration when
                  putting other plates on top!
                  >
                  > So then I went to some art history links and found pictures of
                  typical glassware for cups, ceramics for plates etc. Those of course
                  I can find in abundance at thrift stores, dollar stores and other
                  discount stores not to mention mainstream stores. So are there any
                  suggestions on what 'style' to buy of ceramic/glass?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > One thing that tends to bug me alot about spending very much on the
                  feastware is, what if it gets broken/stolen/lost? Would I cry because
                  of the amount of cash forked over for the items? Can it be replaced
                  easily? So this is why I'm trying to find things that would at
                  least 'pass' at a feast or camp situation but that wouldn't break the
                  bank or be hard to replace.
                  >
                  > One note, I did manage to find some wooden forks and spoons
                  imported from Thailand, they are very cute and tiny! But apparently
                  that's the size they are made for eating with. They also seem rather
                  fragile but they are very cheap.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Any suggestions would be appreciated!
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime
                  rates in the country,"
                  > --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington, DC.
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Do you Yahoo!?
                  > Yahoo! Tax Center - File online by April 15th
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Hilde
                  Greetings all, When DH and I are in late period garb, we use silver. We have two simple goblets, plates, bowls and a wine ewer. They don t match but are
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 3, 2004
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                    Greetings all,

                    When DH and I are in late period garb, we use silver. We have two
                    simple goblets, plates, bowls and a wine ewer. They don't match
                    but are pieces I've picked up here and there. We use only spoons,
                    rounded bowl with simple handle. I admit to using a trophy plate
                    from a golf match my dad won in 1971. It looks like a very simple
                    plate unless one notices the inscription in the very center of the
                    plate, which of course is soon covered with food. A small gesture to
                    missing him so much, and I think he would have had a rousing good
                    time at SCA events. My mother does!

                    For earlier periods, we use my mother's wooden salad bowl set which
                    she purchased new in the late 1950's. We also use cheese boards for
                    plates, they work extremely well as others have said before me,
                    especially if they have a large routed center. I have seen many of
                    these bowls and boards on eBay. Again, we use spoons, they look like
                    dark pewter, but are reproductions (food safe) that we found in a
                    tourist shop just this past summer. We also use DH's sharp belt
                    knife. For drinking, we are using small reproduction pewter-like
                    goblets and a pottery pitcher as a wine ewer.

                    And linens - I agree with previous posters that table linens add so
                    much atmosphere. My mother donated her simple ones to the cause, and
                    I've also seen pretty nice ones at thrift shops for very little money.

                    Storage baskets can also be found at thrift shops. Sometimes places
                    like JoAnn Fabrics ETC will have a 50-70% off sale - like right about
                    now, after Easter. It's easy to pick up a large sturdy basket for
                    under $10.

                    We also try to bring cut flowers or herbs or greens. Our daughter
                    suggested this. In December, we brought small boughs of evergreen
                    that we cut from our yard, quite an armful, and passed them out to
                    those who wanted some. Sometimes folks are allergic - if so, I
                    remove the offending greenery from the room. One time, DH and I
                    stopped by the side of the road to pick a few fern fronds on our way
                    to a feast (not an endangered species here!) I have also seen fresh
                    fruit, leeks, onions, etc. on others' tables.

                    Except for the reproduction spoons and goblets noted above (which I
                    paid about $15 for on sale), I have not needed to purchase a single
                    item. Rather, I have kept my eye open for cast-offs. People often
                    receive feastware-like items as gifts and don't really have a use for
                    them, so are happy to pass them on to someone who does.

                    We are unable to camp so we have not had the pleasure of late-night
                    feasting that does not require driving home afterward. We're trying
                    hard to figure that out.

                    It may sound like we've been doing this for years, but we actually
                    attended our first SCA events *officially* during this past year or
                    so, so I am in fact new. Our daughter has been active for thirteen
                    years (I always made her garb until recently, when she began
                    seamstering, quite successfully I might add) and she finally
                    convinced me to overcome my innate shyness and attend! My amateur
                    studies of European history and costume have been a help, as has my
                    long experience sewing. I am so glad that we have stepped into the
                    SCA world.

                    Pax, Hilde.

                    PS I amazingly have 7 spoons from c. 1490 - 1500 which have been
                    passed down in my family. They are most intriguing, so I have a real
                    sense of what the metal was like then. I certainly wouldn't use them
                    to eat, however.



                    --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "L. Connally" <kkordas@y...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > I've been looking at various SCA guides for newbies about
                    feastware. In many of them they suggest wooden or metal plates. I've
                    looked around at the various sites which list such things for sale
                    and it looks like this can be a rather expensive purchase to gather
                    all the items together.
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