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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Resource for newcomers.

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  • bronwynmgn@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/17/2004 1:46:35 AM Eastern Standard Time, scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 18, 2004
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      In a message dated 1/17/2004 1:46:35 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:

      <<Cunnan is a community written encyclopedia of the SCA. It aims to be
      comprehensive and a lot of the questions that I see asked here are
      covered (and since its a community effort the old timers that hang
      around here are welcome to contribute). It isn't specifically a
      newcomers guide so there are some things that you might not find
      relevant but it does have lots of info that was useful to me when I
      started playing.>>

      Just remember to read this as critically as you would any other source; if
      the page doesn't provide information as to where the material came from (a
      bibliography or something), then there is no guarentee that it is in any way
      accurate, especially when dealing with the history aspects as opposed to the SCA
      custom aspects.

      For instance, I do a lot of period cooking, and I just checked out the recipe
      pages. One of the recipes listed is "Raisin and Fig Cream", and there is a
      comment appended behind it saying "Recipes don't get any more SCA than this.
      *cringe*". I would interpret that to mean that it's not really a historical
      recipe, but something made up by someone in the SCA who didn't know a lot about
      cooking or period cooking, probably made by someone who has a low opinion of
      the scholarship and knowledge of SCA folks.

      Well, I checked it. It is, in fact, an authentic recipe (one of the variants
      of Rapeye), and the interpretation is really very accurate other than
      substituting modern food coloring for a period coloring agent. The entire section is
      taken from, and attributed to, a modern professional work on period cooking,
      Maggie Black's The Medieval Kitchen. So whoever appended the original comment
      a) doesn't recognize a period recipe when they see it, b) doesn't recognize
      the name of the modern work the recipe was taken from, and c) apparently
      thought it sounded nasty (it's not; I've made a variant of it) and therefore had to
      have been invented by a SCAdian. Therefore, I would guess that this is not a
      criticism from someone who actually knows anything about period cooking. I've
      appended my own comment about it being authentic and a good interpretation.

      Brangwayna
    • Tobin Richard
      ... source; if ... from (a ... any way ... to the SCA ... the recipe ... there is a ... than this. ... historical ... lot about ... opinion of ...
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 18, 2004
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        --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, bronwynmgn@a... wrote:
        > In a message dated 1/17/2004 1:46:35 AM Eastern Standard Time,
        > scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
        >
        > Just remember to read this as critically as you would any other
        source; if
        > the page doesn't provide information as to where the material came
        from (a
        > bibliography or something), then there is no guarentee that it is in
        any way
        > accurate, especially when dealing with the history aspects as opposed
        to the SCA
        > custom aspects.
        >
        > For instance, I do a lot of period cooking, and I just checked out
        the recipe
        > pages. One of the recipes listed is "Raisin and Fig Cream", and
        there is a
        > comment appended behind it saying "Recipes don't get any more SCA
        than this.
        > *cringe*". I would interpret that to mean that it's not really a
        historical
        > recipe, but something made up by someone in the SCA who didn't know a
        lot about
        > cooking or period cooking, probably made by someone who has a low
        opinion of
        > the scholarship and knowledge of SCA folks.
        >

        <SNIP>

        Brangwayna brings up a very good point here and you really should
        always look for bibliographic information for any historical
        information regardless of the source. The fact that Cunnan can be
        edited by everyone means that incorrect information can creep in
        (though that means that it is normally edited out quite quickly as well
        :-).

        I think that the "Raisin and fig Cream" comment was a complaint about
        the (perceived?) number of common SCA dishes containing raisins. The
        comment has been edited out of the article now anyway.

        Lukas Uhrmacher.
      • bronwynmgn@aol.com
        In a message dated 1/18/2004 11:56:05 PM Eastern Standard Time, scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 19, 2004
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          In a message dated 1/18/2004 11:56:05 PM Eastern Standard Time,
          scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:

          <<I think that the "Raisin and fig Cream" comment was a complaint about
          the (perceived?) number of common SCA dishes containing raisins.>>

          Well, a lot of medieval recipes do contain either raisins or currants! It's
          not just an "SCA thing". For one thing, a lot of medieval dishes are sweet,
          and sometimes the sweetening is provided by dried fruits rather than sugar.
          For another, most of the recipes for what we would call stews don't use the meat
          and root vegetable combination we associate with the term, but meat, onions,
          and dried currants (which are really just tiny raisins anyway). And for a
          third thing, since they didn't have a way to keep fresh fruits fresh other than
          keeping them in a cool area, and couldn't import them from places where they
          are in season as we do, there would be times of the year when the only fruit
          available would be dried fruits - actually more into the spring and early summer
          than winter, because the apples and pears at least would probably keep fairly
          well for several months after the fall harvest.



          Brangwayna Morgan
          Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
          Lancaster, PA


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