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persona advice

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  • JEFFREY NUSBAUM
    I am very new to the Society, and am working on my persona. As I plan to volunteer as a chiurgeon, I thought I might develop a persona to fit (i.e. from a
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 5, 2003
      I am very new to the Society, and am working on my persona. As I plan to volunteer as a chiurgeon, I thought I might develop a persona to fit (i.e. from a culture with an understanding of medicine and other sciences). I didn't, however, want to get into the whole Rennaisance Italian thing - it's been done to death.

      I considered the druids - my family background is Celtic, after all - but my understanding is that they had pretty much died out or been driven underground before our period of interest.

      I am currently considering a Moorish persona, or a Spaniard from the Moorish period (probably about AD 750 or so - I really don't want to deal with the whole idea of the reconquista). Have found some info on names and the like, but not much yet on dress or customs. I guess what I'm looking for is the little things I could do while in persona to rflect the uniqueness of the culture.

      Any ideas as to sources would be appreciated.


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    • sca_celt
      As the recent ex-Dean of Meridian College of Middle and Far Eastern Studies, please allow me to put a plug in for your choice of a Moorish (or Middle Eastern)
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 5, 2003
        As the recent ex-Dean of Meridian College of Middle and Far Eastern
        Studies, please allow me to put a plug in for your choice of a
        Moorish (or Middle Eastern) persona. :-)

        As a Chirurgeon myself, I think this is a wonderful idea. While in
        many cases, early European "hospitals" were usually simply
        monasteries where the sick were told they would live or die according
        to God's will, not human intervention, Muslim hospitals pioneered the
        practices of diagnosis, cure, and future prevention.

        The first hospital in the Islamic world was built in Damascus in 707,
        and soon most major Islamic cities had hospitals, in which hygiene
        was emphasized and healing was a priority. Hospitals were open 24
        hours a day, and many doctors did not charge for their services. The
        medical school at the University of Jundishapur, once the capital of
        Sassanid Persia, became the largest in the Islamic world by the 9th
        century. Its location in Central Asia allowed it to incorporate
        medical practices from Greece, China, and India, as well as
        developing new techniques and theories.

        With a persona set in this area of the world you can do more to your
        patients than just tell them not to mix their foods, bleed them or
        beat the spirits out of them. (yes, I know that is a stereotypical
        comment on European medicine, but oh, well). :-)

        Rayne


        JEFFREY NUSBAUM <fantasyfan1968@y...> wrote:
        > I am very new to the Society, and am working on my persona. As I
        plan to volunteer as a chiurgeon, I thought I might develop a persona
        to fit (i.e. from a culture with an understanding of medicine and
        other sciences). (parts snipped)
        >
        > I am currently considering a Moorish persona, or a Spaniard from
        the Moorish period (probably about AD 750 or so - I really don't want
        to deal with the whole idea of the reconquista). Have found some
        info on names and the like, but not much yet on dress or customs. I
        guess what I'm looking for is the little things I could do while in
        persona to rflect the uniqueness of the culture.
        >
        > Any ideas as to sources would be appreciated.
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