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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Name question

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  • Juliana Foxcroft
    I did a yahoo search on lillian and origin and found entries for English and Latin; both indicated the name as referring to the lily flower. On
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 16, 2003
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      I did a yahoo search on "lillian" and "origin" and found entries for English and Latin; both indicated the name as referring to the lily flower.

      On Ancestry.com, I found a Lillian Smith who was born approximately 1544 in Sussex, England.

      I'll let you know if I find anything earlier.

      amazonalys <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
      Can anyone tell me the origin of the name Lillian - or anything
      close. The best I've been able to tell after a long, frustrating
      search is that it's either of Latin or Greek origin, but I don't know
      what country's it might have been used in or when. It's my favorite
      name, but I don't think I'm going to find anything like it to suit my
      Norman/English or Norman/Scottish idea for a persona. Thanks!


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      JULIANA FOXCROFT

      The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the kindly smile, nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual inspiration that comes to one when he discovers that someone else believes in him and is willing to trust him with his friendship. --Ralph Waldo Emerson

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Juliana Foxcroft
      Through the Medieval Names link I found a list of names from 1250-1300 that has a Lelien listed under the female non-Germanic names list. Link (you might
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 16, 2003
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        Through the Medieval Names link I found a list of names from 1250-1300 that has a "Lelien" listed under the female non-Germanic names list. Link (you might have to scroll down a little to find it:

        http://www.keesn.nl/name13/li13en_0.htm

        This link lists English feminine given names and lists a Lilian attested in 1279:

        http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/reaney/reaney.cgi?Elizabeth

        And that's where I have to stop for now - hubby just called & I have to meet him downstairs. Will let you know if I can find more.

        JF



        amazonalys <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
        Can anyone tell me the origin of the name Lillian - or anything
        close. The best I've been able to tell after a long, frustrating
        search is that it's either of Latin or Greek origin, but I don't know
        what country's it might have been used in or when. It's my favorite
        name, but I don't think I'm going to find anything like it to suit my
        Norman/English or Norman/Scottish idea for a persona. Thanks!


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        JULIANA FOXCROFT

        The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the kindly smile, nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual inspiration that comes to one when he discovers that someone else believes in him and is willing to trust him with his friendship. --Ralph Waldo Emerson

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • amazonalys
        Lady Juliana to the rescue again! Thank you so much. I ve done a dozen Yahoo searches and didn t come up with anything. Now as I understand it, If I was born
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 17, 2003
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          Lady Juliana to the rescue again! Thank you so much. I've done a
          dozen Yahoo searches and didn't come up with anything.

          Now as I understand it, If I was born in England to Norman parents,
          or English/Norman parents, I'd have an English name. And if I can
          document the name I want being used prior to my time period, it
          should be okay? So do you think Lillian, or some spelling thereof,
          would be okay in the late 13th early 14th century? Surely they don't
          worry about the PART of England the name was found in?

          This is making my brain hurt. Time to pick a name and start having
          fun!

          Again, many thanks.

          --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Juliana Foxcroft <JuliFox@s...>
          wrote:
          > Through the Medieval Names link I found a list of names from 1250-
          1300 that has a "Lelien" listed under the female non-Germanic names
          list. Link (you might have to scroll down a little to find it:
          >
          > http://www.keesn.nl/name13/li13en_0.htm
          >
          > This link lists English feminine given names and lists a Lilian
          attested in 1279:
          >
          > http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/reaney/reaney.cgi?Elizabeth
          >
          > And that's where I have to stop for now - hubby just called & I
          have to meet him downstairs. Will let you know if I can find more.
          >
          > JF
          >
          >
          >
          > amazonalys <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
          > Can anyone tell me the origin of the name Lillian - or anything
          > close. The best I've been able to tell after a long, frustrating
          > search is that it's either of Latin or Greek origin, but I don't
          know
          > what country's it might have been used in or when. It's my
          favorite
          > name, but I don't think I'm going to find anything like it to suit
          my
          > Norman/English or Norman/Scottish idea for a persona. Thanks!
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > scanewcomers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          Service.
          >
          >
          >
          > JULIANA FOXCROFT
          >
          > The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the
          kindly smile, nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual
          inspiration that comes to one when he discovers that someone else
          believes in him and is willing to trust him with his friendship. --
          Ralph Waldo Emerson
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • amazonalys
          Oh shoot! The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names states Lillian was not used as a first name until the 19th century. Maybe I should just give up
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 17, 2003
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            Oh shoot! The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names states
            Lillian was not used as a first name until the 19th century. Maybe I
            should just give up and think of another.

            The sad thing is, I can document my real name with a dozen different
            spellings back to BEFORE the SCA period, but I don't really like it.
          • Juliana Foxcroft
            From doing extensive genealogy on both sides of my family tree, I ve learned that it was and still is common to name a child after a grandparent, aunt/uncle,
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 17, 2003
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              From doing extensive genealogy on both sides of my family tree, I've learned that it was and still is common to name a child after a grandparent, aunt/uncle, brother/sister, etc. When I picked my name, I went on the premise that my was strong-willed French mother insisted on calling me after her beloved great-grandmother, who passed away in France before the family came to England; and then I was given my father's English surname, Foxcroft.

              Since Lillian (or some spelling thereof) was attested to in England in 1279 (the second link I sent you last night), I think that's probably a pretty good argument for using it for a 13th or 14th century English/Norman persona. :D If I remember correctly that particular link was one of the resources I used when I was researching my name, and I was told by local folks at the time that it was a pretty good source. I just printed out the information and attached it to my name form when I turned it all in.

              Hope this helps!

              JF

              amazonalys <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
              Lady Juliana to the rescue again! Thank you so much. I've done a
              dozen Yahoo searches and didn't come up with anything.

              Now as I understand it, If I was born in England to Norman parents,
              or English/Norman parents, I'd have an English name. And if I can
              document the name I want being used prior to my time period, it
              should be okay? So do you think Lillian, or some spelling thereof,
              would be okay in the late 13th early 14th century? Surely they don't
              worry about the PART of England the name was found in?

              This is making my brain hurt. Time to pick a name and start having
              fun!

              Again, many thanks.

              --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Juliana Foxcroft <JuliFox@s...>
              wrote:
              > Through the Medieval Names link I found a list of names from 1250-
              1300 that has a "Lelien" listed under the female non-Germanic names
              list. Link (you might have to scroll down a little to find it:
              >
              > http://www.keesn.nl/name13/li13en_0.htm
              >
              > This link lists English feminine given names and lists a Lilian
              attested in 1279:
              >
              > http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/reaney/reaney.cgi?Elizabeth
              >
              > And that's where I have to stop for now - hubby just called & I
              have to meet him downstairs. Will let you know if I can find more.
              >
              > JF
              >
              >
              >
              > amazonalys <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
              > Can anyone tell me the origin of the name Lillian - or anything
              > close. The best I've been able to tell after a long, frustrating
              > search is that it's either of Latin or Greek origin, but I don't
              know
              > what country's it might have been used in or when. It's my
              favorite
              > name, but I don't think I'm going to find anything like it to suit
              my
              > Norman/English or Norman/Scottish idea for a persona. Thanks!
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > scanewcomers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              Service.
              >
              >
              >
              > JULIANA FOXCROFT
              >
              > The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the
              kindly smile, nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual
              inspiration that comes to one when he discovers that someone else
              believes in him and is willing to trust him with his friendship. --
              Ralph Waldo Emerson
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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              JULIANA FOXCROFT

              The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the kindly smile, nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual inspiration that comes to one when he discovers that someone else believes in him and is willing to trust him with his friendship. --Ralph Waldo Emerson

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Juliana Foxcroft
              No! Don t give up. There is the one documented case of Lilion in the 13th century, and you might be able to argue that your parents named you after a
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 17, 2003
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                No! Don't give up. There is the one documented case of "Lilion" in the 13th century, and you might be able to argue that your parents named you after a grandparent. See if you can find out who is your local herald, share your dilemma with them and they may be able to help you more than I can to find documentation.

                JF

                amazonalys <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                Oh shoot! The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names states
                Lillian was not used as a first name until the 19th century. Maybe I
                should just give up and think of another.

                The sad thing is, I can document my real name with a dozen different
                spellings back to BEFORE the SCA period, but I don't really like it.




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                JULIANA FOXCROFT

                The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the kindly smile, nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual inspiration that comes to one when he discovers that someone else believes in him and is willing to trust him with his friendship. --Ralph Waldo Emerson

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • amazonalys
                Thanks! I ll keep Lilion as my first choice, but come up with some others just in case. I m also fond of several variations of Juliana! ... in the 13th
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 17, 2003
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                  Thanks! I'll keep Lilion as my first choice, but come up with some
                  others just in case. I'm also fond of several variations of
                  Juliana!

                  --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Juliana Foxcroft <JuliFox@s...>
                  wrote:
                  > No! Don't give up. There is the one documented case of "Lilion"
                  in the 13th century, and you might be able to argue that your parents
                  named you after a grandparent. See if you can find out who is your
                  local herald, share your dilemma with them and they may be able to
                  help you more than I can to find documentation.
                  >
                  > JF
                  >
                  > amazonalys <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                  > Oh shoot! The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names states
                  > Lillian was not used as a first name until the 19th century. Maybe
                  I
                  > should just give up and think of another.
                  >
                  > The sad thing is, I can document my real name with a dozen
                  different
                  > spellings back to BEFORE the SCA period, but I don't really like
                  it.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > scanewcomers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  Service.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > JULIANA FOXCROFT
                  >
                  > The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the
                  kindly smile, nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual
                  inspiration that comes to one when he discovers that someone else
                  believes in him and is willing to trust him with his friendship. --
                  Ralph Waldo Emerson
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • bronwynmgn@aol.com
                  In a message dated 7/18/2003 9:49:10 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... In that spelling, certainly. But someone has already posted documentation for Lelian
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 18, 2003
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                    In a message dated 7/18/2003 9:49:10 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                    scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:

                    > Oh shoot! The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names states
                    > Lillian was not used as a first name until the 19th century. Maybe I
                    > should just give up and think of another.
                    >

                    In that spelling, certainly. But someone has already posted documentation
                    for "Lelian" which is nearly identical in pronunciation as being available for a
                    closely related time period in England. There is no reason you couldn't use
                    that. You hav eto remember that medieval spelling wasn't terribly
                    standardized, so I could easily see Lelian, Lilian, etc as possible spelling variants
                    (mind you, I'm not sure they are - that's not my field of study).

                    Brangwayna


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • lukeocracy
                    Is the name Chamberlain possible as a given name?
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 2, 2009
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                      Is the name Chamberlain possible as a given name?
                    • Maria Buchanan
                      Well that depends on the year you re talking about.  From the name I would assume you were thinking of English. Maria ... From: lukeocracy
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 2, 2009
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                        Well that depends on the year you're talking about. 
                        From the name I would assume you were thinking of English.
                        Maria

                        --- On Mon, 2/2/09, lukeocracy <lukeocracy@...> wrote:
                        From: lukeocracy <lukeocracy@...>
                        Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Name question
                        To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Monday, February 2, 2009, 12:26 PM











                        Is the name Chamberlain possible as a given name?


























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