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Waterproof Fabric

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  • ratlater69
    So. After having been to an event and getting rained on profusely, I find myself wanting to get/make a cloak that will be more resistant to fairly heavy rain.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 25, 2003
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      So. After having been to an event and getting rained on profusely, I
      find myself wanting to get/make a cloak that will be more resistant to
      fairly heavy rain. I have a nice, comfortable, warm one, but it's
      made of polyester; so while rain doesn't generally damage it it does
      get saturated with haste.

      So, my question is twofold: a) can polyester be waterproofed, saving
      me some hassle, and b) if not, are there any other fabrics that are
      period (or can pass for period) that would work? I've heard
      conflicting things about wool on this point. How about microfiber?
      Not period at all of course, but could probably pass. ;)

      In days of yore, I'm told, cloaks and other rain-resistant clothing
      were oiled. Does anyone know what fabric & oil was used? I've
      searched a while on the internet for this(as well as the other stuff
      up above) for a while to no avail.
    • oliviacatz
      I know both the previous replies adviced that you use wool, but I thought I should give a slightly different option. Some people (like me) cannot wear sheep s
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 5 2:14 AM
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        I know both the previous replies adviced that you use wool, but I
        thought I should give a slightly different option. Some people (like
        me) cannot wear sheep's wool because we are over sensitive to the
        little barbs on the individual hairs. If you are one of these, check
        into goat wool. Goat wool swells when the surface of the strand gets
        wet, causing the fibers to lock more tightly together and repeling
        the water. The outer surface may be wet, but the under side stays
        dry.


        P.S. (Wool has the added benifit that even when totally saturated,
        such as might happen from sweat or falling in water, it still
        provides excellent insulation. Even if you aren't dry, you can still
        be warm.)
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