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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Flannel chemise

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  • bronwynmgn@aol.com
    In a message dated 11/18/2002 8:56:11 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... Well, a lot of that depends on you. What are you going to use it for? What sort of
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 18, 2002
      In a message dated 11/18/2002 8:56:11 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com writes:


      > I made my first dress a few weeks ago, an early period under dress and over
      > dress. But, being a newbie, I purchased very thin 100% cotton because it
      > was the only 100% cotton I could find. I'm thinking that I should make
      > them both into underdresses, just take the bell sleeves off of the over
      > dress. What sort of fabric should I look for in the future?
      >

      Well, a lot of that depends on you. What are you going to use it for? What
      sort of weather are you likely to be wearing it in? How important is
      authenticity to you?

      You see, for me, the answer is and always will be, linen for undergarments
      (or fustian, linen/cotton blend), and either linen or wool for overgarments,
      unless I ever find that gorgeous hunter green silk again, in which case I
      WILL have a silk gown! Linen overgarments aren't terribly common for England
      in the 12th century, but I simply can't tolerate wool in the summer -
      although I now have some extremely lightweight wool that might work. But I'm
      an authenticity nut.

      If you are using it for "field garb" - stuff you wear for camping events -
      then it needs to wash easily. Court garb, not so much, unless you're a messy
      eater :-) If you are dealing with hot and humid, synthetics are right out,
      since they will only make you hotter as they don't breathe. Synthetics are
      also dangerous around fire, as they tend to melt and stick to you, causing
      much worse burns. Wool, on the other hand, is ideal around fires as it
      rarely actually catches; it will mostly just smoulder a little, and sometimes
      will self-extinguish. That's why they make hearthrugs out of wool - if
      sparks land on the rug, they go out before they can set the rug on fire.

      For some people, the look is more important, and they'll use blends that have
      the right look, rather than paying for the pure fiber. For some people price
      is the most important, and for that cotton is usually the way to go, unless
      you luck into an old linen tablecloth at a thrift store.

      Brangwayna Morgan


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