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Re: Tatting

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  • Rebecca Schmitt
    ... Hmmmm....well, it seems I misremembered - tatting is earlier than crochet. However, in a book on tatting which I have (Tatting in Lace, by Mary Konior)
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 12, 2002
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      >
      > I thought tatting was period, though late, as a way to use the scraps
      > left over making lace and / or a way for those who could not afford
      > lace to get a lace-like effect.
      >
      > William
      >
      Hmmmm....well, it seems I misremembered - tatting is earlier than crochet.
      However, in a book on tatting which I have (Tatting in Lace, by Mary Konior)
      there is a bit of the history of tatting in the introduiction.

      "Historically, tatting is a devleopment of an earlier practrice used in
      embroidery, where a heavy thread or cord, knotted at close intervals like a
      string of beads, would be couched to fabric in order to add texture or
      outline to a design. Knots of different types were used in this way during
      the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in Western Europe, and although few
      of the ensuing embroideris have survived, the pastime of *knotting*
      [emphasis in book], as it was then called, was well document4ed in
      contemporary letters, diaries and verse...A list of ladies who posed shuttle
      in hand for their portraits during the period 1740 to 1780, includes several
      princesses, countesses, and a queen, among oth3er distinguished ranks...

      According to Tina Frauberger, writing in 1919 in Handbuch der
      Schiffchenspitze (Handbook of Shuttle Lace), published directions appeared
      int he early eighteenth century in Nutzbares, galantes und curioses
      Frauenzimmer-Lexicon, 3rd edition 1739...then this must be the earliest
      evidence of genuine tatting."

      Hope that helps clear up some of the history of tatting. However, if there
      is new info, please let me know! I'd love to be able to use tatting!

      **********************
      Rebecca Schmitt
      aka Mistress Agnes Cabot, wife of Master Peter Cabot, cod merchant of
      Bristol,
      BRF FOF

      So many books, so little time

      lotsofteapots@...
      **********************
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