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Re: Heraldry design thoughts, please?

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  • bianca_di_alessandro
    ... That is a period I have enjoyed studying - so here are a few thoughts. 1) The tinctures he chose are very period (no purpure or vert). 2) One primary
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 18, 2012
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      Here is one response that I got that seemed to address your question, hope it is helpful:

      --- In sca_heralds@yahoogroups.com, "rosamond_playfayre" wrote:

      That is a period I have enjoyed studying - so here are a few thoughts.

      1) The tinctures he chose are very period (no purpure or vert).
      2) One primary charge and a subordinary is true to this period (not like later, more crowded devices).
      3) Posture is acceptable (passant evolved fairly early in history of heraldry).
      4) Four-legged beast is fine, but fox is a little unusual (the first use of nearly all non-lion beasts and non-eagle birds was in canting arms): If his persona name is similar to fox in English or French, that would be very true to period!
      5)Beast holding sword in mouth is very unusual that early in period (I think). The tendency was for a rampant animal to hold a sword or other charge: from 20 paces away, would the image be instantly recognizeable to a friend or foe in the midst of battle?

      Here are some period rolls of arms that are fairly close to the time Ben is considering - list is from Wikipedia, but fairly accurate:
      Roll of Caerlaverock or Poem of Caerlaverock,[3] 1300, 110 poetry blazons; The Lord Marshal's Roll, 1295, 565 coats; Collins' Roll, 1296, 598 coats; Stirling Roll, 1304, 102 coats; Stepney Roll, 1308; Dunstable Roll, 1334.

      I recommend Brian look at this site by Brian Timms - some great repaintings and they will help him with period images: http://www.briantimms.net/era/early%20rolls%20of%20arms.htm

      "The blazon (if I got it correct) is azure, a fox passant Or maintaining in its mouth a sword bendwise proper and a chief argent. I am currently vaguely targeting 14th century England/Scottish lowlands.
      I would appreciate any thoughts or suggestions you may have. Thanks,
      Ben."

      In Service I Remain,

      Lady Rosamond Playfayre
      Herald, Shire of Drakenmere
      Kingdom of Meridies
    • bianca_di_alessandro
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 19, 2012
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        Here are some more responses, on the subject of local heralds (not sure if the email links are going to come through) and also about your design in particular:

        --- In EKHerEd@yahoogroups.com, Marc <Commander.Truestar@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hmm,
        >
        > According to Forgotten Seas, their heraldic post
        > is vacant at the moment, but hey have many close neighbor groups...
        > Lord Gaston de Lurs is the Herald of Shire of
        > Calanais Nuadh (gaston.de.lurs@...)
        > Aston Tor's herald can be reached at herald@...
        >
        > There are more on the Kingdom Map, so heralds are close by :D
        >
        > Mithgiladan


        --- In EKHerEd@yahoogroups.com, Alissa Pyrich <alys.mackyntoich@...> wrote:
        >
        > Still swamped, but I can point him at some on line resources. His design
        > isn't incredibly Scottish. It's also very uncommon in Anglo-Scots heraldry
        > for animals to be holding things, unless they have specific jobs, like a
        > crane in its viligance.
        >
        > According to Academy of St. Gabriel Report 2511, some features typical of
        > period Scots heraldry include:
        >
        > * simple, balanced designs
        > * single charges or sets of three charges
        > * a group of identical charges around a fess, a bend, or a chevron
        > * strongly contrasting foreground and background colors; specifically,
        > combinations of blue, red, or black with white/silver and yellow/gold
        > * canting, i.e. using a main charge whose name sounds similar to your
        > surname.
        >
        >
        > The Heraldry Society of Scotland discusses things that make arms
        > particularly Scottish: http://www.heraldry-scotland.co.uk/distinctive.html
        >
        > While this is English rather than Scots, it gives an excellent feel for
        > period style: http://members.shaw.ca/yagowe/caerlaverock/rollpic.html
        >
        > Sorry to link and run,
        >
        > Alys
        >
      • bianca_di_alessandro
        Okay, those links were gaston.de.lurs@gmail.com and herald@astontor.forgottensea.org
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 19, 2012
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          Okay, those links were gaston.de.lurs@... and herald@...

          --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, bianca_di_alessandro <no_reply@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Here are some more responses, on the subject of local heralds (not sure if the email links are going to come through) and also about your design in particular:
          >
          > --- In EKHerEd@yahoogroups.com, Marc <Commander.Truestar@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hmm,
          > >
          > > According to Forgotten Seas, their heraldic post
          > > is vacant at the moment, but hey have many close neighbor groups...
          > > Lord Gaston de Lurs is the Herald of Shire of
          > > Calanais Nuadh (gaston.de.lurs@)
          > > Aston Tor's herald can be reached at herald@
          > >
          > > There are more on the Kingdom Map, so heralds are close by :D
          > >
          > > Mithgiladan
          >
          >
          > --- In EKHerEd@yahoogroups.com, Alissa Pyrich <alys.mackyntoich@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Still swamped, but I can point him at some on line resources. His design
          > > isn't incredibly Scottish. It's also very uncommon in Anglo-Scots heraldry
          > > for animals to be holding things, unless they have specific jobs, like a
          > > crane in its viligance.
          > >
          > > According to Academy of St. Gabriel Report 2511, some features typical of
          > > period Scots heraldry include:
          > >
          > > * simple, balanced designs
          > > * single charges or sets of three charges
          > > * a group of identical charges around a fess, a bend, or a chevron
          > > * strongly contrasting foreground and background colors; specifically,
          > > combinations of blue, red, or black with white/silver and yellow/gold
          > > * canting, i.e. using a main charge whose name sounds similar to your
          > > surname.
          > >
          > >
          > > The Heraldry Society of Scotland discusses things that make arms
          > > particularly Scottish: http://www.heraldry-scotland.co.uk/distinctive.html
          > >
          > > While this is English rather than Scots, it gives an excellent feel for
          > > period style: http://members.shaw.ca/yagowe/caerlaverock/rollpic.html
          > >
          > > Sorry to link and run,
          > >
          > > Alys
          > >
          >
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