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Re: [SCA Newcomers] SCA with a child on the Autism Spectrum?

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  • Ian Green
    Hi, I work in the field of working with and caring for people of various MR/DD diagnosis. What functioning level is your child who has SPD? Can they function
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 4, 2012
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      Hi, I work in the field of working with and caring for people of various
      MR/DD diagnosis. What functioning level is your child who has SPD?

      Can they function at SCA events? Yes. Without major problems? Depends on
      the event.

      SCA events can be wonderful, calming not a lot of sensory input and they
      can be loud, bright, smelly places with lots of tactile sensations going
      on. So that can really clog up the SPD and create some very overwhelming
      situations and responses.

      Of course how your child typically responds (over or under or whatever,) to
      various inputs, really is going to dictate what they can and can not handle.

      It can also be very therapeutic to developing more proper responses and
      coping mechanisms. If possible I would suggest that you attend fighter
      practices and an event or two without the child and then talk about it with
      your therapy team. They, most like, more than anyone can give useful
      answers to how to integrate your child into such environments. Fighter
      practice can be a good way to get an idea of what fighting will be like at
      an event if your fighter practice is large enough. Also ask around your
      group to find out how popular and crowded various events are and what kind
      of setting the event is in.

      A church may be a nice calming place normally but throw a bunch of SCA
      people in the mix and all of a sudden the church is a noisy busy bustling
      place where people rub against one another, merchants are selling things,
      people are talking, the noise can get loud in various rooms and the
      fighting by fencers and heavies can be pretty loud. All of this of course
      provides lots of unusual visual stimuli as well.

      So to sum up my advice.

      1 - Scope out various SCA activities and events without your child if
      possible.

      2 - Talk to the therapy team about your perception of those activities and
      events to come up with a plan to integrate your child into those activities
      and events.

      3 - Ensure that everyone on the team views this as a potentially
      therapeutic help as opposed to a problem to overcome. The responses and
      plan will come out very differently if you can get them to look at this
      through that lens.

      4 - Use your experience with your child and their responses as your guiding
      light through the planning of this.

      5 - Remain flexible. Things happen that aren't expected both challenging
      and GOOD. Cherish the good ones and deal with the challenges just like
      always.

      6 - Change the plan accordingly to accommodate what works and get rid of
      what doesn't.

      7 - Have fun, not fear.

      Ian the Green

      On Thu, Apr 5, 2012 at 1:22 AM, angela <jademozingo@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > Yes, I am a single mom with a child that has Sensory Processing Disorder
      > (on the Autism Spectrum) and I'm still making a go at this very consuming
      > hobby. I thought it was relevant as I'm still a newcomer and it is Autism
      > Awareness month.
      >
      > I was wondering if there were any other parents with children on the
      > spectrum, and if anyone has any tips/tricks to pass on.
      >
      > Angie
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Yours In Service,

      Lord Ian the Green

      http://sites.google.com/site/ianthegreen01/

      Ian's Flickr account <http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianthegreen/>


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Joe Jj
      Salute,I spent years working in special education and just returned to SCA  a year ago myself. Ian s advice is great. But let me add this tell your local
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 5, 2012
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        Salute,I spent years working in special education and just returned to SCA  a year ago myself.
        Ian's advice is great. But let me add this tell your local group,frequently they can be helpful. Get them and you comfortable with each other by going to meetings and fighter practices. They can help you understand what the event will be like, the site may be (many sites are repeats) and you may find other parents that are willing to help you with your son, in a kid sitting ex-change. Also you can see about finding a person that you and your son like that can't afford to go to an event,  offer to pay that persons way in exchange for helping you with your son. This may not be the best answer for you but it is the best suggestions I can come up for you. Lady Leonarda 


        --- On Thu, 4/5/12, Ian Green <ianthegreen01@...> wrote:

        From: Ian Green <ianthegreen01@...>
        Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] SCA with a child on the Autism Spectrum?
        To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, April 5, 2012, 6:53 AM

        Hi, I work in the field of working with and caring for people of various
        MR/DD diagnosis.  What functioning level is your child who has SPD?

        Can they function at SCA events?  Yes.  Without major problems?  Depends on
        the event.

        SCA events can be wonderful, calming not a lot of sensory input and they
        can be loud, bright, smelly places with lots of tactile sensations going
        on.  So that can really clog up the SPD and create some very overwhelming
        situations and responses.

        Of course how your child typically responds (over or under or whatever,) to
        various inputs, really is going to dictate what they can and can not handle.

        It can also be very therapeutic to developing more proper responses and
        coping mechanisms.  If possible I would suggest that you attend fighter
        practices and an event or two without the child and then talk about it with
        your therapy team.  They, most like, more than anyone can give useful
        answers to how to integrate your child into such environments.  Fighter
        practice can be a good way to get an idea of what fighting will be like at
        an event if your fighter practice is large enough.  Also ask around your
        group to find out how popular and crowded various events are and what kind
        of setting the event is in.

        A church may be a nice calming place normally but throw a bunch of SCA
        people in the mix and all of a sudden the church is a noisy busy bustling
        place where people rub against one another, merchants are selling things,
        people are talking, the noise can get loud in various rooms and the
        fighting by fencers and heavies can be pretty loud.  All of this of course
        provides lots of unusual visual stimuli as well.

        So to sum up my advice.

        1 - Scope out various SCA activities and events without your child if
        possible.

        2 - Talk to the therapy team about your perception of those activities and
        events to come up with a plan to integrate your child into those activities
        and events.

        3 - Ensure that everyone on the team views this as a potentially
        therapeutic help as opposed to a problem to overcome.  The responses and
        plan will come out very differently if you can get them to look at this
        through that lens.

        4 - Use your experience with your child and their responses as your guiding
        light through the planning of this.

        5 - Remain flexible.  Things happen that aren't expected both challenging
        and GOOD.  Cherish the good ones and deal with the challenges just like
        always.

        6 - Change the plan accordingly to accommodate what works and get rid of
        what doesn't.

        7 - Have fun, not fear.

        Ian the Green

        On Thu, Apr 5, 2012 at 1:22 AM, angela <jademozingo@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Yes, I am a single mom with a child that has Sensory Processing Disorder
        > (on the Autism Spectrum) and I'm still making a go at this very consuming
        > hobby. I thought it was relevant as I'm still a newcomer and it is Autism
        > Awareness month.
        >
        > I was wondering if there were any other parents with children on the
        > spectrum, and if anyone has any tips/tricks to pass on.
        >
        > Angie
        >

        >



        --
        Yours In Service,

        Lord Ian the Green

        http://sites.google.com/site/ianthegreen01/

        Ian's Flickr account <http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianthegreen/>


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • angela
        He is extremely high functioning, with very little of the social aspect at all. He s nearly purely sensory. He s also a year advanced as far as school goes.
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 5, 2012
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          He is extremely high functioning, with very little of the social aspect at all. He's nearly purely sensory. He's also a year advanced as far as school goes.

          Unfortunately I don't really have a group too interested in newcomers, so I'm hoping to meet some other people from the region. I have also posted on my group's boards to see if and what children's things may be happening.

          Thank you for all the advice,

          Angie

          --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Joe Jj <ccjjoe1@...> wrote:
          >
          > Salute,I spent years working in special education and just returned to SCA  a year ago myself.
          > Ian's advice is great. But let me add this tell your local group,frequently they can be helpful. Get them and you comfortable with each other by going to meetings and fighter practices. They can help you understand what the event will be like, the site may be (many sites are repeats) and you may find other parents that are willing to help you with your son, in a kid sitting ex-change. Also you can see about finding a person that you and your son like that can't afford to go to an event,  offer to pay that persons way in exchange for helping you with your son. This may not be the best answer for you but it is the best suggestions I can come up for you. Lady Leonarda 
          >
          >
          > --- On Thu, 4/5/12, Ian Green <ianthegreen01@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: Ian Green <ianthegreen01@...>
          > Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] SCA with a child on the Autism Spectrum?
          > To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Thursday, April 5, 2012, 6:53 AM
          >
          > Hi, I work in the field of working with and caring for people of various
          > MR/DD diagnosis.  What functioning level is your child who has SPD?
          >
          > Can they function at SCA events?  Yes.  Without major problems?  Depends on
          > the event.
          >
          > SCA events can be wonderful, calming not a lot of sensory input and they
          > can be loud, bright, smelly places with lots of tactile sensations going
          > on.  So that can really clog up the SPD and create some very overwhelming
          > situations and responses.
          >
          > Of course how your child typically responds (over or under or whatever,) to
          > various inputs, really is going to dictate what they can and can not handle.
          >
          > It can also be very therapeutic to developing more proper responses and
          > coping mechanisms.  If possible I would suggest that you attend fighter
          > practices and an event or two without the child and then talk about it with
          > your therapy team.  They, most like, more than anyone can give useful
          > answers to how to integrate your child into such environments.  Fighter
          > practice can be a good way to get an idea of what fighting will be like at
          > an event if your fighter practice is large enough.  Also ask around your
          > group to find out how popular and crowded various events are and what kind
          > of setting the event is in.
          >
          > A church may be a nice calming place normally but throw a bunch of SCA
          > people in the mix and all of a sudden the church is a noisy busy bustling
          > place where people rub against one another, merchants are selling things,
          > people are talking, the noise can get loud in various rooms and the
          > fighting by fencers and heavies can be pretty loud.  All of this of course
          > provides lots of unusual visual stimuli as well.
          >
          > So to sum up my advice.
          >
          > 1 - Scope out various SCA activities and events without your child if
          > possible.
          >
          > 2 - Talk to the therapy team about your perception of those activities and
          > events to come up with a plan to integrate your child into those activities
          > and events.
          >
          > 3 - Ensure that everyone on the team views this as a potentially
          > therapeutic help as opposed to a problem to overcome.  The responses and
          > plan will come out very differently if you can get them to look at this
          > through that lens.
          >
          > 4 - Use your experience with your child and their responses as your guiding
          > light through the planning of this.
          >
          > 5 - Remain flexible.  Things happen that aren't expected both challenging
          > and GOOD.  Cherish the good ones and deal with the challenges just like
          > always.
          >
          > 6 - Change the plan accordingly to accommodate what works and get rid of
          > what doesn't.
          >
          > 7 - Have fun, not fear.
          >
          > Ian the Green
          >
          > On Thu, Apr 5, 2012 at 1:22 AM, angela <jademozingo@...> wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > > Yes, I am a single mom with a child that has Sensory Processing Disorder
          > > (on the Autism Spectrum) and I'm still making a go at this very consuming
          > > hobby. I thought it was relevant as I'm still a newcomer and it is Autism
          > > Awareness month.
          > >
          > > I was wondering if there were any other parents with children on the
          > > spectrum, and if anyone has any tips/tricks to pass on.
          > >
          > > Angie
          > >
          > > 
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > Yours In Service,
          >
          > Lord Ian the Green
          >
          > http://sites.google.com/site/ianthegreen01/
          >
          > Ian's Flickr account <http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianthegreen/>
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Bill Toscano
          Angie: Like anything else, there is a network of parents with kids on the spectrum. Drop me a private note, and I can hook you up with someone in the East who
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 5, 2012
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            Angie: Like anything else, there is a network of parents with kids on the
            spectrum.

            Drop me a private note, and I can hook you up with someone in the East who
            might know folks out near you,

            Liam


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • i_love_latin
            Everyone s given you really good advice so far, but I thought you might want to hear the perspective of someone who has SPD. :) I would imagine that it
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 5, 2012
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              Everyone's given you really good advice so far, but I thought you might want to hear the perspective of someone who has SPD. :)

              I would imagine that it probably helps that I spend most of the louder events wearing a large metal hat stuffed with foam...helmets tend to block out sound. Which makes it difficult enough to understand what people are saying even if you don't have issues filtering sounds through your brain. I think it also has probably helped that as a fighter, I had to get used to the sound of my helm getting hit, which can be very loud, and which I still tend to overprocess if I don't see it coming; nevertheless, you learn to anticipate things (like loud sounds), which, for me at least, makes all the difference in the world.

              SCA events are loud, but the ones without tournaments going on aren't so bad at all. There are Academy sorts of events in which the Great Hall may be loud-ish, but you can go to a nice, quiet classroom whenever you want and learn about something fascinating that goes on in the SCA. As for tournament events, I'm not sure how I'd be able to deal with them if I weren't fighting. The outside ones are usually better because you don't get the sounds echoing through a giant hall, and often there will be an indoor part of the event for classes or merchants or the feast that you can sit in if it gets too loud outside. But I think it helps me knowing what's going on and being interested in watching because the sounds mean something specific and I can see where they're coming from. I'm not sure how old your son is, but if you think he'd be up to it, you might see if he wants to try youth fighting.

              Let's see, what have I forgotten?.... Court is interesting but can get boring if it goes on too long or if you don't know anyone getting awards, so people tend to start getting fidgety as time goes on, which can be really distracting visually and aurally. Often, though, there will be a few people who aren't at court, or who are moving in and out making the feast or whatever, and you'd be fine to step out for a bit if it got to be too much. Feasts are loud; I'm not sure how universal this is for SPD, but I at least tend to be able to tune out loud noises when they are coming from everywhere because they just sort of mush into really loud white noise. The problems I run into at feasts are not being able to hear the people across the table over said white noise (which I think is just a problem generally) and sitting next to someone who eats loudly. Since the general noise tends to drown out most things, you pretty much only hear the people next to you, so if the way they eat doesn't bother you, you're mostly fine. And feasts are pretty relaxed, so you can definitely step outside if you need a break, and there won't really be much of anyone wandering around elsewhere making noise.

              I hope that helps! Let me know if you have any more questions :)

              Alana

              --
              Alana Goodewyn
              Gules, a lion rampant contourny within an orle Or within a bordure sable. (tentative)

              AD GLORIAM AETHELMEARC!
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