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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Personas

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  • Chris
    I am not brand new to SCA, but have just really gotten involved with persona development. First I have participated as just mundane name Chris. I was
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 1, 2011
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      I am not "brand new" to SCA, but have just really gotten involved with persona development. First I have participated as just mundane name Chris. I was welcomed and had a great time. That is the great thing about the SCA, you can do as much or as little as you like and find other people who are at your level. You will find friends no matter. Some of the fun of working on persona is sitting down with people and working out the what and wherefors of things.
      I have started serious persona development out of choice. It helps me in my research of things Norse or Viking. It helps me put a person in my mind when I am reading about things that happened so long ago. Just starting with a name and researching it has shed light on many aspects of the Viking Age for me. It has also led me to look into other cultures of the time and earlier. So for me,persona is a tool, a means to and end. It is also an easy way to just have fun like when I was a kid playing cowboys and indians.
      Hopefully Helpful,
      Arngrimr or just Chris



      --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Susan B. Farmer" <sfarmer@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 5/31/2011 11:01 PM, wren378 wrote:
      > > I had a question about Personas. I joined SCA mainly for costuming, crafts and feasting. I have no interest in creating a persona or roleplaying. How important are personas to SCA?
      > >
      >
      > It's not.
      >
      > I know people who know ever detail about their persona's life.
      >
      > I know even more people who have a name. They wear what they want, when
      > they want -- and they do what they want. Over time, some of them
      > actually have created a persona to go with the name, but it's not necessary.
      >
      > Just remember "name" is not the same as "persona"
      >
      > Jerusha (who still mostly just has a name)
      > --
      > Susan Farmer
      > sfarmer@...
      > Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College
      > Division of Science and Math
      > http://www.abac.edu/sfarmer/
      > http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
      >
    • Chris
      Go as far as you feel comfortable with! Because my persona(there s that word again) is Viking Age, I looked into what feast gear that would entail. But I also
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 2, 2011
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        Go as far as you feel comfortable with! Because my persona(there's that word again) is Viking Age, I looked into what feast gear that would entail. But I also have some more upscale pewter feast ware that I use when I feel a more upscale atmosphere is needed to add to the ambience. I have used a knife, a bread trencher, a wood cup and a candle melted and adhered to a pice of wood as feast gear. The biggest lesson I have learned is have fun. Looking into different things leads you onto different paths. Your first set of feast gear may not be your last.
        Arngrimr

        --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, katfletcher <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi!
        > You've come to the right place, we love questions. First off, what do
        > you mean by silver. Does it look like the silverwear on the typical
        > modern table? Or is it just silver color.
        > I have several sets of feast gear that i have collected over the
        > years. I take different sets to different events based on what kind
        > of "image" I am doing for the event.
        > I have a nice basic set that is a wooden trencher, wooden bowl,
        > ceramic goblet and wooden tankard, an eating knife (single edge -
        > wooden handled steak knife works very nicely!)and wooden spoon. I
        > take that to lower key events and potlucks.
        > Then I have a set that includes a carved wooden plate, brass tankard
        > and a nicer wooden bowl, plus the same utenstils. That is sort of the
        > run of the mill event.
        > Then there is the really fancy stuff. It includes some cobalt blue
        > glass goblets with gold metal trim, ceramic plates that have a blue
        > and gold design on them, a matching tiny goblet for tasting things,
        > brass chargers (larger brass plates that fit under the ceramic
        > plates), cobalt blue glass bowls, place mats and napkins that match
        > the pattern on the ceramic plates, and matching cobalt blue glass
        > salt and pepper bottles. That is the set up we drag out for fancy
        > events like coronations or investitures.
        > We also have a variety of candle holders from simple ones that hold a
        > votive to a really neat 4 taper fancy peweter thingy.
        > My suggestion is to haunt re-sale stores like St. Vincent De Paul and
        > Goodwill. Collect some of the basics and add to your collection as
        > time goes by. Pier One and Cost Plus have sales sometimes and you can
        > pick up some fancy stuff there too.
        > A basket or box is nice to carry stuff in. The most recent one we
        > picked up is still in progress. We got a really terrific basket with
        > handles that is just the right size for the chargers to fit in. They
        > are about a foot in diameter and it had been tricky to find just the
        > right thing. The basket is open at the top but my husband is crafting
        > a wooden lid that will attach with leather hinges and a tie. I am
        > lining the basket with a sturdy cloth that can be removed for washing.
        > Other things you might want to keep in your basket are some trash
        > bags for bringing home the dirty dishes in, a couple of extra cloths
        > for clean ups, a small bottle of a waterless hand cleanser such as
        > Purell, and a lighter (just be careful about leaving it where small
        > kids can get ahold of it!)
        > Another note that kind of goes with this subject. Never put a knife
        > (or sword) back into a sheath while it is still dirty! That is a
        > great way to get botulism or other fun trotting illnesses! What
        > happens is you smear the food particles on the inside of the sheath
        > and then might as well throw the sheath away as you can never really
        > get it clean again. Remember to wipe knives throughly, which is one
        > way those cloths come in handy, and better still, wrap them in the
        > cloths, take them home and give them a proper cleaning. It is a
        > pretty simple thing to make a simple sheath for a steak knife (avoid
        > the ones with pronounced serrations and it will look the part better)
        > by just cutting a scrap of leather to fit and lacing it up. We made
        > more than a dozen one afternoon just so as to have plenty on hand.
        > Plus that way, if you lose it on a platter that goes back to the
        > kitchen too soon, it is no great loss!
        > I guess I rambled on enough for that topic, let's see what others
        > have to say!
        > Kathryn
        >
        >
        > --- In scanewcomers@y..., "yukemiha654" <yukemiha654@y...> wrote:
        > > Hello everyone. I'm new to the sca and I have a lot of questions
        > and
        > > am having difficulty finding any info or any help from anyone for
        > > that matter. I have yet to come up with a persona nor do I have a
        > > name. Any ideas on where to look for interesting time periods or
        > > names? Also, I have some feast gear, but it is silver.... is that
        > ok?
        > > Or should I continue my search for renaisance things.
        >
      • wren378
        I haven t been in SCA long and have only attended a feast two times. The first time I found these beautiful mangowood plates at World Market. The feast was
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 3, 2011
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          I haven't been in SCA long and have only attended a feast two times. The first time I found these beautiful mangowood plates at World Market. The feast was and the next morning I washed the plate thoroughly. About a month late I got it out and it had gone moldy and I had to throw it out. I found some beautiful rough earthenware dishes, again at World Market. I used them at the next feast and I even got compliments and questions if they were handmade. They are also much easier to keep clean. World Market is also an excellent place to buy utensils, etc. The most important lesson I learned about feasts is to carry large enough zip bags to hold your largest plates and still zip closed and always carry a supply of chlorox wipes.
        • Stefan li Rous
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 4, 2011
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            <<< I haven't been in SCA long and have only attended a feast two
            times. The first time I found these beautiful mangowood plates at
            World Market. The feast was and the next morning I washed the plate
            thoroughly. About a month late I got it out and it had gone moldy and
            I had to throw it out. >>>

            If these were wood plates, rather than a veneer, you probably could
            have sanded any mold off and simply refinished them. That may or may
            not have been worth it depending on how cheap the plates were
            originally.

            For those that have wooden feast gear, see this file in the FOOD-
            UTENSILS section of the Florilegium. The main thing as mentioned is to
            wipe the plates down as soon as you can. And don't just let the wood
            utensils sit in a liquid, including dish water.
            wood-utn-care-msg (16K) 5/15/08 Care of utensils made of wood.
            http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-UTENSILS/wood-utn-care-msg.html

            <<< I found some beautiful rough earthenware dishes, again at World
            Market. I used them at the next feast and I even got compliments and
            questions if they were handmade. They are also much easier to keep
            clean. World Market is also an excellent place to buy utensils, etc.
            >>>

            potry-utn-care-msg (6K) 8/18/09 Care of pottery cooking utensils.
            http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-UTENSILS/potry-utn-care-msg.html

            You can even cook in pottery utensils, if you are careful and avoid
            quick temperature changes.
            pottery-cookng-msg(22K) 1/29/08 Cooking in clay pots. Do and don'ts.
            http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-UTENSILS/pottery-cookng-msg.html

            <<< The most important lesson I learned about feasts is to carry large
            enough zip bags to hold your largest plates and still zip closed and
            always carry a supply of chlorox wipes. >>>

            The chlorox wipes are probably a good idea, especially for multi-day
            or multi-meal events. For one feast events, I've usually take along a
            large plastic bags and stick the dishes in there, to be taken home and
            washed there. It did take me several years or events to start doing
            that :-( Sometimes facilities are provided in the feast hall,
            sometimes not. But you generally don't want to wash dirty dishes in a
            site bathroom because that can clog the drains.

            Stefan

            --------
            THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra
            Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous@...
            **** See Stefan's Florilegium files at: http://www.florilegium.org ****
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