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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Makeup?

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  • Alison Choyce
    Terrific question!! Many women who wear make-up mundanely continue to wear it in the SCA. And some wear it in the SCA, even they don t mundanely, because it IS
    Message 1 of 8 , May 12, 2011
      Terrific question!!

      Many women who wear make-up mundanely continue to wear it in the SCA. And
      some wear it in the SCA, even they don't mundanely, because it IS
      appropriate for their persona. In certain times and places throughout
      history facial make-up was worn, the look was based on the culture and your
      status within the culture.

      To simply wear your mundane make-up, many of us do. I just tone mine a
      little, though I'm not heavy handed mundanely anyway. I also opt for
      eyeliner to define my eyes, rather than mascara.

      I'm sure there will be other answers, but I imagine what they all amount to
      is to do what you are comfortable with. :)

      Alison Wodehalle
      East Kingdom


      On Thu, May 12, 2011 at 5:20 PM, Amber Russell <amberalamode@...>wrote:

      >
      >
      > Hello!
      > I have yet another question. I don't want to interfere with other folks'
      > enjoyment by not keeping in the authenticity of the period. So, my question
      > is, is it acceptable for women to wear makeup and if so what is deemed
      > appropriate?
      >
      > Many thanks!
      > Amber
      >
      >
      >



      --
      ~Alison


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Justinos Tekton called Justin
      ... Yes, but please don t recreate the full authenticity of facial makeup made out of lead or mercury. ;-) Justin -- ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::
      Message 2 of 8 , May 13, 2011
        On Thu, 2011-05-12 at 17:44 -0400, Alison Choyce wrote:
        > Many women who wear make-up mundanely continue to wear it in the SCA.
        > And
        > some wear it in the SCA, even they don't mundanely, because it IS
        > appropriate for their persona. In certain times and places throughout
        > history facial make-up was worn, the look was based on the culture and
        > your
        > status within the culture.


        Yes, but please don't recreate the full authenticity of facial makeup
        made out of lead or mercury. ;-)

        Justin

        --
        ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]xxxx()
        Maistor Justinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
        Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two keys
        fesswise reversed sable.

        justin@... http://4th.com/sca/justin/
      • Dave Roland
        Wear whatever you want as long as it is normal everyday makeup. Ian the Green
        Message 3 of 8 , May 13, 2011
          Wear whatever you want as long as it is normal everyday makeup.

          Ian the Green
          --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Amber Russell" <amberalamode@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello!
          > I have yet another question. I don't want to interfere with other folks' enjoyment by not keeping in the authenticity of the period. So, my question is, is it acceptable for women to wear makeup and if so what is deemed appropriate?
          >
          > Many thanks!
          > Amber
          >
        • Stefan li Rous
          Amber asked:
          Message 4 of 8 , May 13, 2011
            Amber asked:
            <<< I don't want to interfere with other folks' enjoyment by not
            keeping in the authenticity of the period. So, my question is, is it
            acceptable for women to wear makeup and if so what is deemed
            appropriate? >>>

            As others have mentioned, I would generally wear what you normally
            would wear.

            Unless perhaps you have bright red or purple hair or a lot of
            piercings, you won't stand out enough to be intrusive.

            If you do have a brightly artificial hair color, I would recommend
            covering it with a hat, headdress or veil. In general, only unmarried
            women went around with their hair uncovered. I know some women in the
            SCA who will wear additional long braided locks if they prefer or
            can't wear their hair long.

            Make-up and hair coloring was done in the Middle Ages. Whether it was
            frowned upon by the church would depend upon the time period and place.
            Certain make-up, such as lipstick may also have connotations in period
            that you don't want (harlot, prostitute) but unless you are playing
            such a persona, this is still the modern age and most people won't
            make assumptions.

            There is a lot of information about period make-up and hair care in
            the PERSONAL CARE section of the Florilegium.

            My favorite phrase from the hair-dyeing-msg file is:
            <<< I'm much minded of the Will Cuppy essay where he gives Lucrezia
            Borgia's hair-bleach formula, and finishes up with "If your hair
            remained on your head, you were a blonde." >>>

            So I would be careful when experimenting with any of the period
            recipes. Lye, arsenic and lead compounds show up in various recipes.
            I've heard that Queen Elizabeth caked on white lead onto her face to
            get a pale complexion and by the end of her life she was having to put
            it on pretty heavy to cover the damage that it had already done.

            Some files in the PERSONAL CARE section to explore:
            cosmetics-lnks (10K) 4/18/06 Links to info on medieval cosmetics and
            perfumes by Dame Aoife Finn of Ynos Mon.

            cosmetics-msg (16K) 5/13/10 Period cosmetics and skin care.

            Handcream-art (16K) 6/ 5/00 "Handcream" by Constance de LaRose.

            handcream-msg (12K) 4/17/08 Medieval lotions and handcreams. recipes.

            Hand-Lotion-art (4K) 6/21/08 "A Lotion Recipe from Late Period
            England" by Lady Rebecca the Contrary.

            hair-msg (94K) 2/ 6/11 Period and SCA hairstyling and care.

            hair-dyeing-msg (12K) 9/ 4/01 Period hair bleaching and dyeing.

            Perfumes-bib (20K) 12/26/00 "Perfumes Bibliography" by Nora Siri Bock.

            perfumes-msg (36K) 9/19/02 Medieval perfumes and pomanders.

            In the ACCESSORIES section:

            body-piercngs-msg (4K) 11/27/05 Body piercings, other than for ear
            rings.




            --------
            THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra
            Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous@...
            **** See Stefan's Florilegium files at: http://www.florilegium.org ****
          • angela
            I am very new as well, but I do have a few suggestions on this. Do a natural look. -Tinted moisturiser instead of thick foundation (provides sunscreen,
            Message 5 of 8 , May 26, 2011
              I am very new as well, but I do have a few suggestions on this. Do a "natural" look.
              -Tinted moisturiser instead of thick foundation (provides sunscreen, color, and doesn't get oily nasty when sweating)
              -Brown eyeliner (unless you have black hair!) instead of a colored or black
              -Brown Masacara, again if you have black hair use black. Honestly I would simplify and just use an eyelash curler (defines the eyes a bit) and skip it entirely
              -LipSTAIN only a shade or two darker than your natural lip color. Gloss or lipstick would be more obtrusive than stain.
              -make sure to cover the lipstain with a chapstick type thing with SPF (sunburned lips...ouch)

              This is what I do when I am taking my son to the zoo and so forth. It usually doesn't need touching up, if it does not much at all.

              Angie

              --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Stefan li Rous <stefanlirous@...> wrote:
              >
              > Amber asked:
              > <<< I don't want to interfere with other folks' enjoyment by not
              > keeping in the authenticity of the period. So, my question is, is it
              > acceptable for women to wear makeup and if so what is deemed
              > appropriate? >>>
              >
              > As others have mentioned, I would generally wear what you normally
              > would wear.
              >
              > Unless perhaps you have bright red or purple hair or a lot of
              > piercings, you won't stand out enough to be intrusive.
              >
              > If you do have a brightly artificial hair color, I would recommend
              > covering it with a hat, headdress or veil. In general, only unmarried
              > women went around with their hair uncovered. I know some women in the
              > SCA who will wear additional long braided locks if they prefer or
              > can't wear their hair long.
              >
              > Make-up and hair coloring was done in the Middle Ages. Whether it was
              > frowned upon by the church would depend upon the time period and place.
              > Certain make-up, such as lipstick may also have connotations in period
              > that you don't want (harlot, prostitute) but unless you are playing
              > such a persona, this is still the modern age and most people won't
              > make assumptions.
              >
              > There is a lot of information about period make-up and hair care in
              > the PERSONAL CARE section of the Florilegium.
              >
              > My favorite phrase from the hair-dyeing-msg file is:
              > <<< I'm much minded of the Will Cuppy essay where he gives Lucrezia
              > Borgia's hair-bleach formula, and finishes up with "If your hair
              > remained on your head, you were a blonde." >>>
              >
              > So I would be careful when experimenting with any of the period
              > recipes. Lye, arsenic and lead compounds show up in various recipes.
              > I've heard that Queen Elizabeth caked on white lead onto her face to
              > get a pale complexion and by the end of her life she was having to put
              > it on pretty heavy to cover the damage that it had already done.
              >
              > Some files in the PERSONAL CARE section to explore:
              > cosmetics-lnks (10K) 4/18/06 Links to info on medieval cosmetics and
              > perfumes by Dame Aoife Finn of Ynos Mon.
              >
              > cosmetics-msg (16K) 5/13/10 Period cosmetics and skin care.
              >
              > Handcream-art (16K) 6/ 5/00 "Handcream" by Constance de LaRose.
              >
              > handcream-msg (12K) 4/17/08 Medieval lotions and handcreams. recipes.
              >
              > Hand-Lotion-art (4K) 6/21/08 "A Lotion Recipe from Late Period
              > England" by Lady Rebecca the Contrary.
              >
              > hair-msg (94K) 2/ 6/11 Period and SCA hairstyling and care.
              >
              > hair-dyeing-msg (12K) 9/ 4/01 Period hair bleaching and dyeing.
              >
              > Perfumes-bib (20K) 12/26/00 "Perfumes Bibliography" by Nora Siri Bock.
              >
              > perfumes-msg (36K) 9/19/02 Medieval perfumes and pomanders.
              >
              > In the ACCESSORIES section:
              >
              > body-piercngs-msg (4K) 11/27/05 Body piercings, other than for ear
              > rings.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --------
              > THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra
              > Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous@...
              > **** See Stefan's Florilegium files at: http://www.florilegium.org ****
              >
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