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RE: [SCA Newcomers] Ready to wear

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  • Elizabeth Walpole
    ... From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of peneth4 Sent: Monday, 9 November 2009 9:50 PM To:
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 10, 2009
      -----Original Message-----
      From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of peneth4
      Sent: Monday, 9 November 2009 9:50 PM
      To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Ready to wear

      Hi (again)

      OK, knowing just how little I do about sewing I am now ready to give in and
      buy a dress ready to wear.

      I live in Australia but am willing to buy from overseas but am weary of
      doing so without advice as I see costumes made of Satin or stretch velvet
      and with gold trim etc.

      Many thanks
      Lady Merwyn aka Penny


      ------------------------------------

      Greetings from a fellow Australian, whereabouts are you located?

      I would suggest you ask your group about loaner garb, good quality ready
      made garb tends to be expensive (you are paying for the time somebody put
      into research as well as the time they put into making it) but a lot of
      SCAdians pass their old garb on to their local group when they can no longer
      wear it (sometimes because it was an early attempt and they aren't happy
      with the level of authenticity, but other times because it doesn't fit
      anymore) that gives you time to get together the resources you need to make
      your own outfit. The whole reason why loaner garb exists is for people who
      are new to the society an easier introduction. There is rarely a problem
      with you borrowing an outfit repeatedly. It's also worth asking in your
      local group if anybody is willing to give you sewing lessons. Here in
      Politarchopolis (Canberra) we have a weekly arts and sciences meeting where
      people get together and work on projects if your group has something similar
      that would probably be the best place to ask about learning to sew. Also if
      you have a local college (university group) they will almost certainly run
      some sort of basic garb making classes at the beginning of the next school
      year to get their new recruits wearing something (though that would mean
      waiting till February or March)

      Other people have suggested good overseas merchants but if you are in
      Brisbane you might want to look at Asa and Contarina's small luxuries they
      sell good quality garb and have the documentation to back up what they sell
      unfortunately their website http://www.aandcsmalluxuries.com.au/ isn't
      really functional as a store (though you could email them) if you make it to
      Rowany Festival next Easter their stall there is a good way to supplement a
      small wardrobe if you've got the cash.

      As for your question on patterned fabric brocades in relatively simple
      geometric patterns (e.g. diamonds, checks etc.) is usually a safe bet. Have
      a look at Cynthia Virtue's website for a quick guide
      http://www.virtue.to/articles/modern_fabric.html it's not comprehensive, but
      it gives you an idea of the sort of things to look for. Eventually as you
      look at more and more period sources you will find you will develop an eye
      for period styles and you will get a gut feeling for what looks period or
      not (sometimes I _feel_ that something looks wrong and it takes me a while
      to identify consciously what I have picked up subconsciously)

      HTH
      Elizabeth
      -----------------------------------------
      Elizabeth Walpole | Elizabeth Beaumont
      Canberra, Australia | Politarchopolis, Lochac
      http://magpiecostumer.110mb.com/
    • peneth4
      Greetings dearest Elizabeth I thank you for your kind reply. I have had the pleasure of meeting the Baronesse Contarina and spoke to her about the
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 11, 2009
        Greetings dearest Elizabeth

        I thank you for your kind reply. I have had the pleasure of meeting the Baronesse Contarina and spoke to her about the possibility of getting some garb made.

        As I have attended a few events already and will be attending many more I'm actually after several outfits.

        I appreciate your information on possible sewing options but as anyone who saw my first (and only) attempt at making a basic tunic would say . . . getting someone else to make my garb is a good idea. Seriously, I really am THAT BAD at sewing.

        Thank you
        Lady Merwyn aka Penny

        --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Elizabeth Walpole" <ewalpole@...> wrote:
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com] On
        > Behalf Of peneth4
        > Sent: Monday, 9 November 2009 9:50 PM
        > To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Ready to wear
        >
        > Hi (again)
        >
        > OK, knowing just how little I do about sewing I am now ready to give in and
        > buy a dress ready to wear.
        >
        > I live in Australia but am willing to buy from overseas but am weary of
        > doing so without advice as I see costumes made of Satin or stretch velvet
        > and with gold trim etc.
        >
        > Many thanks
        > Lady Merwyn aka Penny
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Greetings from a fellow Australian, whereabouts are you located?
        >
        > I would suggest you ask your group about loaner garb, good quality ready
        > made garb tends to be expensive (you are paying for the time somebody put
        > into research as well as the time they put into making it) but a lot of
        > SCAdians pass their old garb on to their local group when they can no longer
        > wear it (sometimes because it was an early attempt and they aren't happy
        > with the level of authenticity, but other times because it doesn't fit
        > anymore) that gives you time to get together the resources you need to make
        > your own outfit. The whole reason why loaner garb exists is for people who
        > are new to the society an easier introduction. There is rarely a problem
        > with you borrowing an outfit repeatedly. It's also worth asking in your
        > local group if anybody is willing to give you sewing lessons. Here in
        > Politarchopolis (Canberra) we have a weekly arts and sciences meeting where
        > people get together and work on projects if your group has something similar
        > that would probably be the best place to ask about learning to sew. Also if
        > you have a local college (university group) they will almost certainly run
        > some sort of basic garb making classes at the beginning of the next school
        > year to get their new recruits wearing something (though that would mean
        > waiting till February or March)
        >
        > Other people have suggested good overseas merchants but if you are in
        > Brisbane you might want to look at Asa and Contarina's small luxuries they
        > sell good quality garb and have the documentation to back up what they sell
        > unfortunately their website http://www.aandcsmalluxuries.com.au/ isn't
        > really functional as a store (though you could email them) if you make it to
        > Rowany Festival next Easter their stall there is a good way to supplement a
        > small wardrobe if you've got the cash.
        >
        > As for your question on patterned fabric brocades in relatively simple
        > geometric patterns (e.g. diamonds, checks etc.) is usually a safe bet. Have
        > a look at Cynthia Virtue's website for a quick guide
        > http://www.virtue.to/articles/modern_fabric.html it's not comprehensive, but
        > it gives you an idea of the sort of things to look for. Eventually as you
        > look at more and more period sources you will find you will develop an eye
        > for period styles and you will get a gut feeling for what looks period or
        > not (sometimes I _feel_ that something looks wrong and it takes me a while
        > to identify consciously what I have picked up subconsciously)
        >
        > HTH
        > Elizabeth
        > -----------------------------------------
        > Elizabeth Walpole | Elizabeth Beaumont
        > Canberra, Australia | Politarchopolis, Lochac
        > http://magpiecostumer.110mb.com/
        >
      • Elizabeth Walpole
        ... From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of peneth4 Sent: Wednesday, 11 November 2009 10:04 PM To:
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 11, 2009
          -----Original Message-----
          From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of peneth4
          Sent: Wednesday, 11 November 2009 10:04 PM
          To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] Ready to wear



          Greetings dearest Elizabeth

          I thank you for your kind reply. I have had the pleasure of meeting the
          Baronesse Contarina and spoke to her about the possibility of getting some
          garb made.

          As I have attended a few events already and will be attending many more I'm
          actually after several outfits.

          I appreciate your information on possible sewing options but as anyone who
          saw my first (and only) attempt at making a basic tunic would say . . .
          getting someone else to make my garb is a good idea. Seriously, I really
          am THAT BAD at sewing.

          Thank you
          Lady Merwyn aka Penny

          ----------------------------------

          Don't discount the possibility that you might get better at sewing with
          practice (and a teacher, it makes a big difference to have somebody beside
          you who can show you what to do rather than trying to muddle through by
          yourself). A lot of people come into the SCA without ever having touched a
          sewing machine and learn as they go. However if making clothing really
          doesn't appeal to you that's OK paying or bartering for skills you don't
          have is common in the SCA.
          If you're sure you don't want to make your own clothes I would definitely
          opt for somebody local where you can see things in person and the person
          making the garment can also take your measurements to make sure you get a
          the best fit possible.
          Elizabeth
        • Judith Epstein
          ... Barter, barter, barter. There s someone out there who loves to sew, but hates to cook. Bring food for them to your events, and trade the skills. There s
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 11, 2009
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com] On
            > Behalf Of peneth4
            > Sent: Wednesday, 11 November 2009 10:04 PM
            > To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] Ready to wear
            >
            > I appreciate your information on possible sewing options but as
            > anyone who
            > saw my first (and only) attempt at making a basic tunic would
            > say . . .
            > getting someone else to make my garb is a good idea. Seriously, I
            > really
            > am THAT BAD at sewing.
            >
            > Thank you
            > Lady Merwyn aka Penny

            Barter, barter, barter. There's someone out there who loves to sew,
            but hates to cook. Bring food for them to your events, and trade the
            skills. There's someone out there who wants feast gear; if you've got
            extra feast gear, or if you know how to make your own, arrange a
            trade. If you can learn a very few of the most basic embroidery
            methods, trade that for sewing -- it's gorgeous, takes up a lot of
            time, and isn't too demanding skill-wise (well, anyway, cross-stitch
            doesn't take much skill, though it does require patience). It's
            tedious work, and some seamsters won't want to spend their time
            decorating when they could spend it making more garments. Watch their
            kids, shovel their snow. Everyone has SOMETHING they'd rather get
            someone else to do. :)

            If you ever think you might like to learn to sew in order to save
            yourself some money in the garb department, read on. I'm sort of in
            the same boat, but I bit the bullet and bought a sewing machine. Now I
            HAVE to learn to use it! Fortunately there's a very patient friend I
            have, who's willing to spend Sundays at my place, showing me how to
            lay out and cut out patterns, pin things correctly, cut correctly, and
            put them together correctly. Also, when I bought the machine, I
            learned that I could get as many free lessons as I want in how to use
            it. They won't teach me to sew, but they'll teach me what all the
            buttons and knobs do, how to thread the machine, how to load a
            bobbin... it's really, really little nitpicky stuff that's important,
            but that you'd never really think to do yourself. Instruction books
            are great, but there's just no substitute for a human teacher. Call
            around the local sewing/fabric stores and see if any of them offer
            similar instruction in the use of the machines they sell.

            Judith / no SCA name yet
            Master Albrecht Waldfurster's Egg
            Middle Kingdom, Midlands, Ayreton, Tree-Girt-Sea (Chicago, IL)
          • Ziddinaaitzumar@comcast.net
            No, no no, Lady Merwyn, don t give up on learning how to sew yet! I took [well, was forced to take...] a nine-weeks class in sewing in the public school
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 11, 2009
              No, no no, Lady Merwyn, don't give up on learning how to sew yet!



              I took [well, was forced to take...] a nine-weeks' class in sewing in the public school system in the USA, got a "D" [really, really bad grade], and was 'written off' as a future sewer by both the teacher and my mother.  That was when I was 13 years old.  When I turned 18, my mother took one look at me, realized she had a 'clothes horse' [someone who wears clothes well and WANTS LOTS OF THEM!!] on her hands...



              So what did she do?  Our previous, annual 'shopping trips' for my school clothes had always turned into shopping trips FOR HER, so the only contribution she made to my clothing expenses was to buy me a cheap sewing machine...



              Now, some 30-40 years later, that little 13-year-old who nearly FLUNKED sewing in school has won TWO AWARDS from the International Costumers' Association; at their 2005 convention, for my "Eternal Infernal Elizabethan" gown.  Not totally authentic in period (I used a serger on some of the interior seams), but close enough to pass polite inspection, provided the Laurel doesn't become too personal/intrusive...



              So, please don't give up on your sewing skills.  You probably just need to find someone who'll take the time to educate you in the proper techniques for fitting, as well as sewing.



              Besides, it's much cheaper, as well as [ultimately] more fulfilling...  Ziddina


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "peneth4" <peneth4@...>
              To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, November 11, 2009 4:03:47 AM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
              Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] Ready to wear

               






              Greetings dearest Elizabeth

              I thank you for your kind reply. I have had the pleasure of meeting the Baronesse Contarina and spoke to her about the possibility of getting some garb made.

              As I have attended a few events already and will be attending many more I'm actually after several outfits.

              I appreciate your information on possible sewing options but as anyone who saw my first (and only) attempt at making a basic tunic would say . . . getting someone else to make my garb is a good idea. Seriously, I really am THAT BAD at sewing.

              Thank you
              Lady Merwyn aka Penny

              --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com , "Elizabeth Walpole" <ewalpole@...> wrote:
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com ] On
              > Behalf Of peneth4
              > Sent: Monday, 9 November 2009 9:50 PM
              > To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Ready to wear
              >
              > Hi (again)
              >
              > OK, knowing just how little I do about sewing I am now ready to give in and
              > buy a dress ready to wear.
              >
              > I live in Australia but am willing to buy from overseas but am weary of
              > doing so without advice as I see costumes made of Satin or stretch velvet
              > and with gold trim etc.
              >
              > Many thanks
              > Lady Merwyn aka Penny
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Greetings from a fellow Australian, whereabouts are you located?
              >
              > I would suggest you ask your group about loaner garb, good quality ready
              > made garb tends to be expensive (you are paying for the time somebody put
              > into research as well as the time they put into making it) but a lot of
              > SCAdians pass their old garb on to their local group when they can no longer
              > wear it (sometimes because it was an early attempt and they aren't happy
              > with the level of authenticity, but other times because it doesn't fit
              > anymore) that gives you time to get together the resources you need to make
              > your own outfit. The whole reason why loaner garb exists is for people who
              > are new to the society an easier introduction. There is rarely a problem
              > with you borrowing an outfit repeatedly. It's also worth asking in your
              > local group if anybody is willing to give you sewing lessons. Here in
              > Politarchopolis (Canberra) we have a weekly arts and sciences meeting where
              > people get together and work on projects if your group has something similar
              > that would probably be the best place to ask about learning to sew. Also if
              > you have a local college (university group) they will almost certainly run
              > some sort of basic garb making classes at the beginning of the next school
              > year to get their new recruits wearing something (though that would mean
              > waiting till February or March)
              >
              > Other people have suggested good overseas merchants but if you are in
              > Brisbane you might want to look at Asa and Contarina's small luxuries they
              > sell good quality garb and have the documentation to back up what they sell
              > unfortunately their website http://www.aandcsmalluxuries.com.au/ isn't
              > really functional as a store (though you could email them) if you make it to
              > Rowany Festival next Easter their stall there is a good way to supplement a
              > small wardrobe if you've got the cash.
              >
              > As for your question on patterned fabric brocades in relatively simple
              > geometric patterns (e.g. diamonds, checks etc.) is usually a safe bet. Have
              > a look at Cynthia Virtue's website for a quick guide
              > http://www.virtue.to/articles/modern_fabric.html it's not comprehensive, but
              > it gives you an idea of the sort of things to look for. Eventually as you
              > look at more and more period sources you will find you will develop an eye
              > for period styles and you will get a gut feeling for what looks period or
              > not (sometimes I _feel_ that something looks wrong and it takes me a while
              > to identify consciously what I have picked up subconsciously)
              >
              > HTH
              > Elizabeth
              > -----------------------------------------
              > Elizabeth Walpole | Elizabeth Beaumont
              > Canberra, Australia | Politarchopolis, Lochac
              > http://magpiecostumer.110mb.com/
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Elizabeth Walpole
              ... From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of peneth4 Sent: Wednesday, 11 November 2009 10:04 PM To:
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 12, 2009
                -----Original Message-----
                From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of peneth4
                Sent: Wednesday, 11 November 2009 10:04 PM
                To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] Ready to wear



                Greetings dearest Elizabeth

                I thank you for your kind reply. I have had the pleasure of meeting the
                Baronesse Contarina and spoke to her about the possibility of getting some
                garb made.

                As I have attended a few events already and will be attending many more I'm
                actually after several outfits.

                I appreciate your information on possible sewing options but as anyone who
                saw my first (and only) attempt at making a basic tunic would say . . .
                getting someone else to make my garb is a good idea. Seriously, I really
                am THAT BAD at sewing.

                Thank you
                Lady Merwyn aka Penny

                ----------------------------------

                Don't discount the possibility that you might get better at sewing with
                practice and a teacher (practical skills like sewing are much easier to
                learn if you have somebody with you who can show you exactly what to do
                rather than trying to muddle through alone). A lot of people come into the
                SCA without ever having touched a sewing machine and learn as they go.
                However if making clothing really doesn't appeal to you that's OK, you don't
                need to persist in doing something you really don't like.
                If you really want to buy your clothing readymade I would suggest contacting
                Contarina as you're likely to get a better result when the person making the
                garment can see you and you can see the garment or fabric in person (a
                friend swore off mail ordering clothing when she bought a dress in a colour
                she thought she liked but made her look horrible when it was against her
                skin)
                -----------------------------------------
                Elizabeth Walpole | Elizabeth Beaumont
                Canberra, Australia | Politarchopolis, Lochac
                http://magpiecostumer.110mb.com/
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