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RE: [SCA Newcomers] Re: Wood spoons preparationand washing (was need feast gear)

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  • Kyla
    That s a good idea; you could use beeswax, (or another period wax) if you have some - beeswax doesn t go rancid, is water proof, and tastes good, besides. We
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 30 8:06 PM
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      That's a good idea; you could use beeswax, (or another period wax) if you
      have some - beeswax doesn't go rancid, is water proof, and tastes good,
      besides.
      We do that with leather that may get wet, too.
      (Like pouches, and armour carriers.)

      Tabitha Pennywarden
      Ravenslake, Midlands
      Middle Kingdom

      -----Original Message-----
      From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com]On
      Behalf Of Robert Bohler
      Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:34 PM
      To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] Re: Wood spoons preparationand washing (was
      need feast gear)





      Here's a tip from the food service industry ( in which I work ). For
      wooden cutting boards, cover the board in a HEAVY layer of salt (1/4 inch
      thick) and allow it to sit over-night. This will draw all that nasty
      bacteria and stuff out of the wood. Throw away the salt the next morning,
      (its full of bacteria anyway right?)
      Afterwards melt some food grade parafin wax, and coat the board in a thin
      layer, allow it to harden. Scrape off the excess wax, and your good to go.
      You can reuse the wax too.

      Robert Bohler
      Canton of Greyfells
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Stefan li Rous
      To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:30 PM
      Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: Wood spoons preparationand washing (was need
      feast gear)

      Padhraig O' Cellachain
      <<< BUT HOW DO I WAS MY UNSEALED WOODEN SPOONS TO GET ALL THE
      MICROSCOPIC CREEPY CRAWLIES OUT OF THE PORES >>>

      There is an on-going controversy on whether plastic or wooden cutting
      boards are better from the sanitary standpoint. It was found that, to
      a surprising extent, that wood is naturally antibiotic. As I said
      though this is still controversial. What I would do is once the wooden
      spoons are clean, soak them in a chlorine bleach solution for awhile.
      Not long enough that the wood starts to deteriorate from soaking in
      the liquid but long enough to kill any possible creepy crawlies.

      Then I would wipe them down with an edible oil which won't go rancid.
      This will help keep future creepy crawlies out as well as keeping the
      wood from drying out so much it splinters.

      Stefan
      --------
      THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra
      Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous@...
      **** See Stefan's Florilegium files at: http://www.florilegium.org ****

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Stefan li Rous
      Tabitha Pennywarden suggested:
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 1, 2009
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        Tabitha Pennywarden suggested:
        <<< That's a good idea; you could use beeswax, (or another period wax)
        if you
        have some - beeswax doesn't go rancid, is water proof, and tastes good,
        besides.
        We do that with leather that may get wet, too.
        (Like pouches, and armour carriers.) >>>

        This will work. The only problem with using beeswax on things like
        wooden spoons or leather mugs or in drinking horns, is that if you
        then use them in hot beverages or fill the drinking vessels with them,
        you may find a layer of beeswax floating on top. Beeswax melts at an
        even lower temperature than paraffin.

        The files on leather mugs and drinking horns in the Florilegium have
        more discussion on this. There may also be some discussion in there on
        plastic coatings that work and are safe. When I researched it, it was
        real difficult to find anyone who would say that there plastic
        coatings were 'food-safe' because of liability reasons, but there are
        some.

        Stefan
        --------
        THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra
        Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous@...
        **** See Stefan's Florilegium files at: http://www.florilegium.org ****
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