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Need feast gear?

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  • Coblaith Muimnech
    When you eat feast at an S.C.A. event, you almost always have to provide your own dishes and utensils. Wooden spoons were used throughout the S.C.A s core
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 23, 2009
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      When you eat feast at an S.C.A. event, you almost always have to
      provide your own dishes and utensils. Wooden spoons were used
      throughout the S.C.A's core period, all over Europe, so they're an
      excellent choice for most personae.

      I found at my local Jo-Ann Fabrics and Crafts store a two-pack of
      suitable wooden spoons for US$1. They're just about exactly the size
      of the dining spoons in my kitchen drawer, albeit with slightly
      longer handles. One has a narrower, more tapered head, and the other
      a wider, rounder one. They were in the impulse-buy bins lining the
      area where shoppers wait to check out. I snapped a quick picture and
      uploaded it at <http://coblaith.net/temp/spoons.html> along with
      links to some pictures of period wooden spoons for those who might
      want to compare them. I don't know whether they'll be available at
      all Jo-Ann stores, but it seems likely that they'll be at a lot of
      them. The packaging indicates the spoons were manufactured
      specifically for the company. You can find the location nearest you
      by consulting the store finder on the website <http://www.joann.com/
      joann/catalog.jsp?CATID=stores>; they're all over the U.S.

      If you're trying to build up a collection of feast gear, I recommend
      a set of these for each person sharing your basket. (That way, you'll
      each have a spoon for dessert that doesn't taste like soup.) If
      you're a wood carver or interested in learning wood carving, you
      might grab a few extra. A spoon with a nicely-decorated handle would
      be a lovely way to practice or show off your skill, and just about
      anybody in the S.C.A. would love to get one as a gift. (See the page
      on which I uploaded my photo for links to some period models.)


      Coblaith Muimnech
      <mailto:Coblaith@...>
      <http://coblaith.net>
    • svanarose
      Thank you Coblaith! Since i love to go to jo-anns and other fabric stores, you gave me a reason to ....wander. Those spoons are a perfect size. I have 6 sets
      Message 2 of 20 , Jun 24, 2009
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        Thank you Coblaith!

        Since i love to go to jo-anns and other fabric stores, you gave me a reason to ....wander. Those spoons are a perfect size. I have 6 sets now soaking up vegetable oil. They can also be found in the dollar bins.

        Svana
        --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Coblaith Muimnech <Coblaith@...> wrote:
        >
        > When you eat feast at an S.C.A. event, you almost always have to
        > provide your own dishes and utensils. Wooden spoons were used
        > throughout the S.C.A's core period, all over Europe, so they're an
        > excellent choice for most personae.
        >
        > I found at my local Jo-Ann Fabrics and Crafts store a two-pack of
        > suitable wooden spoons for US$1. They're just about exactly the size
        > of the dining spoons in my kitchen drawer, albeit with slightly
        > longer handles. One has a narrower, more tapered head, and the other
        > a wider, rounder one. They were in the impulse-buy bins lining the
        > area where shoppers wait to check out. I snapped a quick picture and
        > uploaded it at <http://coblaith.net/temp/spoons.html> along with
        > links to some pictures of period wooden spoons for those who might
        > want to compare them. I don't know whether they'll be available at
        > all Jo-Ann stores, but it seems likely that they'll be at a lot of
        > them. The packaging indicates the spoons were manufactured
        > specifically for the company. You can find the location nearest you
        > by consulting the store finder on the website <http://www.joann.com/
        > joann/catalog.jsp?CATID=stores>; they're all over the U.S.
        >
        > If you're trying to build up a collection of feast gear, I recommend
        > a set of these for each person sharing your basket. (That way, you'll
        > each have a spoon for dessert that doesn't taste like soup.) If
        > you're a wood carver or interested in learning wood carving, you
        > might grab a few extra. A spoon with a nicely-decorated handle would
        > be a lovely way to practice or show off your skill, and just about
        > anybody in the S.C.A. would love to get one as a gift. (See the page
        > on which I uploaded my photo for links to some period models.)
        >
        >
        > Coblaith Muimnech
        > <mailto:Coblaith@...>
        > <http://coblaith.net>
        >
      • ladyellen2
        Thank you so much for the idea. I went to my local Joannes and cleaned them out. I plan on donating 10 packages to my shire for gold key feast gear and/or
        Message 3 of 20 , Jun 25, 2009
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          Thank you so much for the idea. I went to my local Joannes and cleaned them out. I plan on donating 10 packages to my shire for gold key feast gear and/or extra utensils for feast preparation.
          I love this group!! Everyone is so friendly and willing to help.
          Question to the woodworkers: is there anything I should do to make the spoons food-worthy? They are, as far as I can tell, raw wood of unknown origin.

          Thank you.

          Patti
          Shire of Ravenslake
          Middle Kingdom
          Crystal Lake, IL

          --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Coblaith Muimnech <Coblaith@...> wrote:
          >
          > When you eat feast at an S.C.A. event, you almost always have to
          > provide your own dishes and utensils. Wooden spoons were used
          > throughout the S.C.A's core period, all over Europe, so they're an
          > excellent choice for most personae.
          >
          > I found at my local Jo-Ann Fabrics and Crafts store a two-pack of
          > suitable wooden spoons for US$1. They're just about exactly the size
          > of the dining spoons in my kitchen drawer, albeit with slightly
          > longer handles. One has a narrower, more tapered head, and the other
          > a wider, rounder one. They were in the impulse-buy bins lining the
          > area where shoppers wait to check out. I snapped a quick picture and
          > uploaded it at <http://coblaith.net/temp/spoons.html> along with
          > links to some pictures of period wooden spoons for those who might
          > want to compare them. I don't know whether they'll be available at
          > all Jo-Ann stores, but it seems likely that they'll be at a lot of
          > them. The packaging indicates the spoons were manufactured
          > specifically for the company. You can find the location nearest you
          > by consulting the store finder on the website <http://www.joann.com/
          > joann/catalog.jsp?CATID=stores>; they're all over the U.S.
          >
          > If you're trying to build up a collection of feast gear, I recommend
          > a set of these for each person sharing your basket. (That way, you'll
          > each have a spoon for dessert that doesn't taste like soup.) If
          > you're a wood carver or interested in learning wood carving, you
          > might grab a few extra. A spoon with a nicely-decorated handle would
          > be a lovely way to practice or show off your skill, and just about
          > anybody in the S.C.A. would love to get one as a gift. (See the page
          > on which I uploaded my photo for links to some period models.)
          >
          >
          > Coblaith Muimnech
          > <mailto:Coblaith@...>
          > <http://coblaith.net>
          >
        • svanarose
          I would welcome any advice in that area as well. If there is something different that can be done other than what ive done that was taught to me by my great
          Message 4 of 20 , Jun 25, 2009
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            I would welcome any advice in that area as well. If there is something different that can be done other than what ive done that was taught to me by my great grandmother. Any time i bought new wooden spoons, i always coated them well in cooking oil. Let it soak in and do it a few more times. Seemed to work. But as i said, i would welcome any other advice or ideas.

            Svana

            --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "ladyellen2" <ladyellen2@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thank you so much for the idea. I went to my local Joannes and cleaned them out. I plan on donating 10 packages to my shire for gold key feast gear and/or extra utensils for feast preparation.
            > I love this group!! Everyone is so friendly and willing to help.
            > Question to the woodworkers: is there anything I should do to make the spoons food-worthy? They are, as far as I can tell, raw wood of unknown origin.
            >
            > Thank you.
            >
            > Patti
            > Shire of Ravenslake
            > Middle Kingdom
            > Crystal Lake, IL
            >
            > --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Coblaith Muimnech <Coblaith@> wrote:
            > >
            > > When you eat feast at an S.C.A. event, you almost always have to
            > > provide your own dishes and utensils. Wooden spoons were used
            > > throughout the S.C.A's core period, all over Europe, so they're an
            > > excellent choice for most personae.
            > >
            > > I found at my local Jo-Ann Fabrics and Crafts store a two-pack of
            > > suitable wooden spoons for US$1. They're just about exactly the size
            > > of the dining spoons in my kitchen drawer, albeit with slightly
            > > longer handles. One has a narrower, more tapered head, and the other
            > > a wider, rounder one. They were in the impulse-buy bins lining the
            > > area where shoppers wait to check out. I snapped a quick picture and
            > > uploaded it at <http://coblaith.net/temp/spoons.html> along with
            > > links to some pictures of period wooden spoons for those who might
            > > want to compare them. I don't know whether they'll be available at
            > > all Jo-Ann stores, but it seems likely that they'll be at a lot of
            > > them. The packaging indicates the spoons were manufactured
            > > specifically for the company. You can find the location nearest you
            > > by consulting the store finder on the website <http://www.joann.com/
            > > joann/catalog.jsp?CATID=stores>; they're all over the U.S.
            > >
            > > If you're trying to build up a collection of feast gear, I recommend
            > > a set of these for each person sharing your basket. (That way, you'll
            > > each have a spoon for dessert that doesn't taste like soup.) If
            > > you're a wood carver or interested in learning wood carving, you
            > > might grab a few extra. A spoon with a nicely-decorated handle would
            > > be a lovely way to practice or show off your skill, and just about
            > > anybody in the S.C.A. would love to get one as a gift. (See the page
            > > on which I uploaded my photo for links to some period models.)
            > >
            > >
            > > Coblaith Muimnech
            > > <mailto:Coblaith@>
            > > <http://coblaith.net>
            > >
            >
          • Ron Osceola
            You might try butcher block finish it is food safe and available at most home improvement centers. ... -- Love and Blessings, Ron Osceola, CHT
            Message 5 of 20 , Jun 25, 2009
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              You might try "butcher block finish" it is food safe and available at most
              home improvement centers.

              On Thu, Jun 25, 2009 at 9:43 PM, ladyellen2 <ladyellen2@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              > Thank you so much for the idea. I went to my local Joannes and cleaned them
              > out. I plan on donating 10 packages to my shire for gold key feast gear
              > and/or extra utensils for feast preparation.
              > I love this group!! Everyone is so friendly and willing to help.
              > Question to the woodworkers: is there anything I should do to make the
              > spoons food-worthy? They are, as far as I can tell, raw wood of unknown
              > origin.
              >
              > Thank you.
              >
              > Patti
              > Shire of Ravenslake
              > Middle Kingdom
              > Crystal Lake, IL
              >
              > --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com <scanewcomers%40yahoogroups.com>,
              > Coblaith Muimnech <Coblaith@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > When you eat feast at an S.C.A. event, you almost always have to
              > > provide your own dishes and utensils. Wooden spoons were used
              > > throughout the S.C.A's core period, all over Europe, so they're an
              > > excellent choice for most personae.
              > >
              > > I found at my local Jo-Ann Fabrics and Crafts store a two-pack of
              > > suitable wooden spoons for US$1. They're just about exactly the size
              > > of the dining spoons in my kitchen drawer, albeit with slightly
              > > longer handles. One has a narrower, more tapered head, and the other
              > > a wider, rounder one. They were in the impulse-buy bins lining the
              > > area where shoppers wait to check out. I snapped a quick picture and
              > > uploaded it at <http://coblaith.net/temp/spoons.html> along with
              > > links to some pictures of period wooden spoons for those who might
              > > want to compare them. I don't know whether they'll be available at
              > > all Jo-Ann stores, but it seems likely that they'll be at a lot of
              > > them. The packaging indicates the spoons were manufactured
              > > specifically for the company. You can find the location nearest you
              > > by consulting the store finder on the website <http://www.joann.com/
              > > joann/catalog.jsp?CATID=stores>; they're all over the U.S.
              > >
              > > If you're trying to build up a collection of feast gear, I recommend
              > > a set of these for each person sharing your basket. (That way, you'll
              > > each have a spoon for dessert that doesn't taste like soup.) If
              > > you're a wood carver or interested in learning wood carving, you
              > > might grab a few extra. A spoon with a nicely-decorated handle would
              > > be a lovely way to practice or show off your skill, and just about
              > > anybody in the S.C.A. would love to get one as a gift. (See the page
              > > on which I uploaded my photo for links to some period models.)
              > >
              > >
              > > Coblaith Muimnech
              > > <mailto:Coblaith@...>
              > > <http://coblaith.net>
              > >
              >
              >
              >



              --
              Love and Blessings,
              Ron Osceola, CHT

              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bearintuitions
              804.385.0485


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • ladyellen2
              I understand that gold key is meant to be used and returned, but I am concerned about the spoons. As they are porous, and Hepatitis can live for years on just
              Message 6 of 20 , Jun 25, 2009
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                I understand that gold key is meant to be used and returned, but I am concerned about the spoons. As they are porous, and Hepatitis can live for years on just about anything, reactivating when moistened; and there are a lot of other nasties floating around.......would the butcher block finish make the wood 'sealed'? Could it be run through a dishwasher or put in a mild bleach solution? Or would it be best to consider the spoons gold-key-give-away gear?

                Thank you again.

                Patti
                Crystal Lake, IL
                Ravenslake Shire
                Middle Kingdon

                --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Ron Osceola <ronosceola@...> wrote:
                >
                > You might try "butcher block finish" it is food safe and available at most
                > home improvement centers.
                >
                >
              • Justinos Tekton called Justin
                ... Or just use metal utensils for Gold Key gear. Pick something that has a plain design so it doesn t look overtly modern. My wife and I have utensils bought
                Message 7 of 20 , Jun 26, 2009
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                  On Fri, 2009-06-26 at 05:30 +0000, ladyellen2 wrote:
                  > I understand that gold key is meant to be used and returned, but I am
                  > concerned about the spoons. As they are porous, and Hepatitis can
                  > live for years on just about anything, reactivating when moistened;
                  > and there are a lot of other nasties floating around.......would the
                  > butcher block finish make the wood 'sealed'? Could it be run through
                  > a dishwasher or put in a mild bleach solution? Or would it be best to
                  > consider the spoons gold-key-give-away gear?


                  Or just use metal utensils for Gold Key gear. Pick something that has a
                  plain design so it doesn't look overtly modern. My wife and I have
                  utensils bought from World Market or Pier One (I forget which) that are
                  made of stainless steel but look Middle Ages to the casual eye.

                  I can't imagine anyone snarking at a newcomer for using metal utensils
                  that they borrowed from Gold Key. Well, I can imagine it, but I also
                  would imagine that the rest of the SCA would tar and feather the snarky
                  person.

                  If you have to choose between health/safety and authenticity, choose
                  health/safety. If you have the option to be authentic while remaining
                  healthy and safe, choose authenticity. :-)

                  Justin

                  --
                  ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]xxxx()
                  Maistor Justinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
                  Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two keys
                  fesswise reversed sable.

                  justin@... http://4th.com/sca/justin/
                • Giertrud Gyldenstierne
                  So you re saying I SHOULDN T wear lead-white as make-up :P YIS, Giertrud Gyldenstierne (g yair-trood ghee-yule-den-stee-air-nuh) God is my lyght and saluation,
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jun 26, 2009
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                    So you're saying I SHOULDN'T wear lead-white as make-up :P
                    YIS,

                    Giertrud Gyldenstierne

                    (g'yair-trood ghee-yule-den-stee-air-nuh)

                    God is my lyght and saluation, whom then shall I feare? God is the strength
                    of my life, of whom then shall I be afraide?




                    > If you have to choose between health/safety and authenticity, choose
                    > health/safety. If you have the option to be authentic while remaining
                    > healthy and safe, choose authenticity. :-)
                    >
                    >
                    > .
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • krysnamarimba
                    These spoons are a great idea! I ll have to go find some next time I m at JoAnn s. I am wondering, would decorating the handle with wood burning be period?
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jun 26, 2009
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                      These spoons are a great idea! I'll have to go find some next time I'm at JoAnn's. I am wondering, would decorating the handle with wood burning be period? I have done some carving and some wood burning, but the wood burning is much easier and generally turns out better, so I would prefer to decorate that way. Thanks for the info!
                    • Vanessa
                      I ve found quite a few options for wooden plates and bowls (Mostly from Vermont) They are often sealed already. I should think small serving utensils would be
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jun 26, 2009
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                        I've found quite a few options for wooden plates and bowls (Mostly from Vermont) They are often sealed already. I should think small serving utensils would be the same. Would pre-sealed things be considered OK?
                      • christopher chastain
                        Most folks back then would just have the plain wooden utensils as that was more of a common item and not something that would be fancy. Not saying you could nt
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jun 26, 2009
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                          Most folks back then would just have the plain wooden utensils as that was more of a common item and not something that would be fancy. Not saying you could'nt decorate them just have to keep in mind what was normal everyday made with a sharp knife from a piece of wood to something that was meant to be traded or sold. If your busy doing your daily chores your not gonna spend much time on things that dont require any more work than what is neccessary.





                          Yours in Humble Service,
                          Pomestnik Dmitrii Zarekoi Ivanov
                          "Fate rarely calls upon us at a moment of our choosing!"





                          To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                          From: krysna@...
                          Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2009 17:30:55 +0000
                          Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: Need feast gear?







                          These spoons are a great idea! I'll have to go find some next time I'm at JoAnn's. I am wondering, would decorating the handle with wood burning be period? I have done some carving and some wood burning, but the wood burning is much easier and generally turns out better, so I would prefer to decorate that way. Thanks for the info!









                          _________________________________________________________________
                          Lauren found her dream laptop. Find the PC that�s right for you.
                          http://www.microsoft.com/windows/choosepc/?ocid=ftp_val_wl_290

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • bronwynmgn@aol.com
                          In a message dated 6/26/2009 8:36:29 AM Eastern Daylight Time, justin@4th.com writes:
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jun 26, 2009
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                            In a message dated 6/26/2009 8:36:29 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
                            justin@... writes:

                            <<If you have to choose between health/safety and authenticity, choose
                            health/safety. If you have the option to be authentic while remaining
                            healthy and safe, choose authenticity. :-)>>

                            You can choose metal spoons and still be perfectly authentic. There are
                            quite a few surviving metal spoons from the Middle Ages. They tend to look
                            slightly different from modern spoons; the handles tend to be very skinny and
                            round and the bowls are more tear-drop shaped, with the pointy bit where
                            the bowl joins the handle.

                            Here's a picture of a 15th century artifact spoon
                            _http://time-lines.co.uk/medieval-spoon-010968-21210-0.html_
                            (http://time-lines.co.uk/medieval-spoon-010968-21210-0.html)

                            This page shows a whole selection of replica spoons, most of them based on
                            medieval originals (there are a few 17th century ones there as well)
                            _http://www.pewterreplicas.com/dept.asp?id=30_
                            (http://www.pewterreplicas.com/dept.asp?id=30)




                            Brangwayna Morgan
                            Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
                            Lancaster, PA
                            **************Stay connected and tighten your budget with a great mobile
                            device for under $20. Take a Peek!
                            (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100122638x1222405996x1201457362/aol?redir=http://www.getpeek.com/aol)


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • jay davis
                            accually i think you should wear it if you want to. the rest of us should opt for not wearing it. ;) john of antioche
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jun 27, 2009
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                              accually i think you should wear it if you want to. the rest of us should opt for not wearing it. ;) john of antioche


                              --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Giertrud Gyldenstierne <giertrud@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > So you're saying I SHOULDN'T wear lead-white as make-up :P
                              > YIS,
                              >
                              > Giertrud Gyldenstierne
                              >
                              > (g'yair-trood ghee-yule-den-stee-air-nuh)
                              >
                              > God is my lyght and saluation, whom then shall I feare? God is the strength
                              > of my life, of whom then shall I be afraide?
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > > If you have to choose between health/safety and authenticity, choose
                              > > health/safety. If you have the option to be authentic while remaining
                              > > healthy and safe, choose authenticity. :-)
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > .
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • Callahan Patrick
                              BUT HOW DO I WAS MY UNSEALED WOODEN SPOONS TO GET ALL THE MICROSCOPIC CREEPY CRAWLIES OUT OF THE PORES Padhraig O Cellachain [Non-text portions of this
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jun 29, 2009
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                                BUT HOW DO I WAS MY UNSEALED WOODEN SPOONS TO GET ALL THE MICROSCOPIC CREEPY CRAWLIES OUT OF THE PORES

                                Padhraig O' Cellachain






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Kyla
                                Soak it in warm soapy water for about half an hour. The soap will be absorbed with the water, and kill any bacteria. Same goes for any other wooden implement;
                                Message 15 of 20 , Jun 30, 2009
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                                  Soak it in warm soapy water for about half an hour.
                                  The soap will be absorbed with the water, and kill any bacteria.
                                  Same goes for any other wooden implement; bowls, mugs, etc.
                                  Then finish washing as usual.
                                  (-:

                                  Tabitha Pennywarden

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com]On
                                  Behalf Of Callahan Patrick
                                  Sent: Monday, June 29, 2009 8:00 PM
                                  To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] Wood spoons preparationand washing (was need
                                  feast gear)





                                  BUT HOW DO I WAS MY UNSEALED WOODEN SPOONS TO GET ALL THE MICROSCOPIC
                                  CREEPY CRAWLIES OUT OF THE PORES

                                  Padhraig O' Cellachain

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Coblaith Muimnech
                                  ... Just wash them with warm soapy water. If you haven t let them sit around dirty, they should come clean easily enough. Coblaith Muimnech Barony of Bryn
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Jun 30, 2009
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                                    Padhraig O' Cellachain wrote:
                                    > BUT HOW DO I WAS MY UNSEALED WOODEN SPOONS TO GET ALL THE
                                    > MICROSCOPIC CREEPY CRAWLIES OUT OF THE PORES

                                    Just wash them with warm soapy water. If you haven't let them sit
                                    around dirty, they should come clean easily enough.


                                    Coblaith Muimnech
                                    Barony of Bryn Gwlad
                                    Kingdom of Ansteorra
                                    <mailto:Coblaith@...>
                                    <http://coblaith.net>
                                  • Stefan li Rous
                                    Padhraig O Cellachain There is an on-going
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Jun 30, 2009
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                                      Padhraig O' Cellachain
                                      <<< BUT HOW DO I WAS MY UNSEALED WOODEN SPOONS TO GET ALL THE
                                      MICROSCOPIC CREEPY CRAWLIES OUT OF THE PORES >>>

                                      There is an on-going controversy on whether plastic or wooden cutting
                                      boards are better from the sanitary standpoint. It was found that, to
                                      a surprising extent, that wood is naturally antibiotic. As I said
                                      though this is still controversial. What I would do is once the wooden
                                      spoons are clean, soak them in a chlorine bleach solution for awhile.
                                      Not long enough that the wood starts to deteriorate from soaking in
                                      the liquid but long enough to kill any possible creepy crawlies.

                                      Then I would wipe them down with an edible oil which won't go rancid.
                                      This will help keep future creepy crawlies out as well as keeping the
                                      wood from drying out so much it splinters.

                                      Stefan
                                      --------
                                      THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra
                                      Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous@...
                                      **** See Stefan's Florilegium files at: http://www.florilegium.org ****
                                    • Robert Bohler
                                      Here s a tip from the food service industry ( in which I work ). For wooden cutting boards, cover the board in a HEAVY layer of salt (1/4 inch thick) and
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Jun 30, 2009
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                                        Here's a tip from the food service industry ( in which I work ). For wooden cutting boards, cover the board in a HEAVY layer of salt (1/4 inch thick) and allow it to sit over-night. This will draw all that nasty bacteria and stuff out of the wood. Throw away the salt the next morning, (its full of bacteria anyway right?)
                                        Afterwards melt some food grade parafin wax, and coat the board in a thin layer, allow it to harden. Scrape off the excess wax, and your good to go. You can reuse the wax too.

                                        Robert Bohler
                                        Canton of Greyfells
                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        From: Stefan li Rous
                                        To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:30 PM
                                        Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: Wood spoons preparationand washing (was need feast gear)





                                        Padhraig O' Cellachain
                                        <<< BUT HOW DO I WAS MY UNSEALED WOODEN SPOONS TO GET ALL THE
                                        MICROSCOPIC CREEPY CRAWLIES OUT OF THE PORES >>>

                                        There is an on-going controversy on whether plastic or wooden cutting
                                        boards are better from the sanitary standpoint. It was found that, to
                                        a surprising extent, that wood is naturally antibiotic. As I said
                                        though this is still controversial. What I would do is once the wooden
                                        spoons are clean, soak them in a chlorine bleach solution for awhile.
                                        Not long enough that the wood starts to deteriorate from soaking in
                                        the liquid but long enough to kill any possible creepy crawlies.

                                        Then I would wipe them down with an edible oil which won't go rancid.
                                        This will help keep future creepy crawlies out as well as keeping the
                                        wood from drying out so much it splinters.

                                        Stefan
                                        --------
                                        THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra
                                        Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous@...
                                        **** See Stefan's Florilegium files at: http://www.florilegium.org ****





                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Kyla
                                        That s a good idea; you could use beeswax, (or another period wax) if you have some - beeswax doesn t go rancid, is water proof, and tastes good, besides. We
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Jun 30, 2009
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                                          That's a good idea; you could use beeswax, (or another period wax) if you
                                          have some - beeswax doesn't go rancid, is water proof, and tastes good,
                                          besides.
                                          We do that with leather that may get wet, too.
                                          (Like pouches, and armour carriers.)

                                          Tabitha Pennywarden
                                          Ravenslake, Midlands
                                          Middle Kingdom

                                          -----Original Message-----
                                          From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com]On
                                          Behalf Of Robert Bohler
                                          Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:34 PM
                                          To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] Re: Wood spoons preparationand washing (was
                                          need feast gear)





                                          Here's a tip from the food service industry ( in which I work ). For
                                          wooden cutting boards, cover the board in a HEAVY layer of salt (1/4 inch
                                          thick) and allow it to sit over-night. This will draw all that nasty
                                          bacteria and stuff out of the wood. Throw away the salt the next morning,
                                          (its full of bacteria anyway right?)
                                          Afterwards melt some food grade parafin wax, and coat the board in a thin
                                          layer, allow it to harden. Scrape off the excess wax, and your good to go.
                                          You can reuse the wax too.

                                          Robert Bohler
                                          Canton of Greyfells
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          From: Stefan li Rous
                                          To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:30 PM
                                          Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: Wood spoons preparationand washing (was need
                                          feast gear)

                                          Padhraig O' Cellachain
                                          <<< BUT HOW DO I WAS MY UNSEALED WOODEN SPOONS TO GET ALL THE
                                          MICROSCOPIC CREEPY CRAWLIES OUT OF THE PORES >>>

                                          There is an on-going controversy on whether plastic or wooden cutting
                                          boards are better from the sanitary standpoint. It was found that, to
                                          a surprising extent, that wood is naturally antibiotic. As I said
                                          though this is still controversial. What I would do is once the wooden
                                          spoons are clean, soak them in a chlorine bleach solution for awhile.
                                          Not long enough that the wood starts to deteriorate from soaking in
                                          the liquid but long enough to kill any possible creepy crawlies.

                                          Then I would wipe them down with an edible oil which won't go rancid.
                                          This will help keep future creepy crawlies out as well as keeping the
                                          wood from drying out so much it splinters.

                                          Stefan
                                          --------
                                          THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra
                                          Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous@...
                                          **** See Stefan's Florilegium files at: http://www.florilegium.org ****

                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • Stefan li Rous
                                          Tabitha Pennywarden suggested:
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Jul 1, 2009
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                                            Tabitha Pennywarden suggested:
                                            <<< That's a good idea; you could use beeswax, (or another period wax)
                                            if you
                                            have some - beeswax doesn't go rancid, is water proof, and tastes good,
                                            besides.
                                            We do that with leather that may get wet, too.
                                            (Like pouches, and armour carriers.) >>>

                                            This will work. The only problem with using beeswax on things like
                                            wooden spoons or leather mugs or in drinking horns, is that if you
                                            then use them in hot beverages or fill the drinking vessels with them,
                                            you may find a layer of beeswax floating on top. Beeswax melts at an
                                            even lower temperature than paraffin.

                                            The files on leather mugs and drinking horns in the Florilegium have
                                            more discussion on this. There may also be some discussion in there on
                                            plastic coatings that work and are safe. When I researched it, it was
                                            real difficult to find anyone who would say that there plastic
                                            coatings were 'food-safe' because of liability reasons, but there are
                                            some.

                                            Stefan
                                            --------
                                            THLord Stefan li Rous Barony of Bryn Gwlad Kingdom of Ansteorra
                                            Mark S. Harris Austin, Texas StefanliRous@...
                                            **** See Stefan's Florilegium files at: http://www.florilegium.org ****
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