Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA Newcomers] How to make soap.

Expand Messages
  • Sara L Uckelman
    ... Is this really the case? With references to hand I can easily find a number of references to men making soap: In English contexts: In Bertil Thuresson,
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 30, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Quoth Lava Quod est Sordidium:
      > Finding 'period info' is almost impossible. Soap was done by the women while
      > the men were butchering and no one bothered to write down how it happened. It
      > was just passed mother to daughter

      Is this really the case? With references to hand I can easily
      find a number of references to men making soap:

      In English contexts:
      In Bertil Thuresson, _Middle English Occupational Terms_, p. 203
      cites "R. Colett, sopemaker" from Yorkshire in 1412.

      Gustav Fransson, _Middle English Surnames of Occupation 1100-1350_
      pp. 71-72 has numerous examples of <sopere> 'soapmaker' from
      1255 to 1337. There are 26 men and 3 women. (There's also one
      example of the grammatically feminine form, <le Sopestere> 1285,
      used by a woman). From French <savonnier> 'maker, seller of soap'
      he cites 6 examples in the 13th C, all men.

      The Middle English Dictionary (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/med/)
      s.v. sopere (2) also has primarily masculine examples of the
      term, with just two references to women that I can see.

      In French contexts:
      The 1292 census of Paris lists five men with the byname <le
      savonnier>, and only one woman with the byname <la savonniere>
      (and this could either mean that she herself was a soapmaker, or
      that she was the daughter or wife of a soapmaker.

      So it seems like terms meaning 'soapmaker' were used more
      frequently to describe men than women in English and French in
      the 13th and 14th C.

      -Aryanhwy



      --
      vita sine literis mors est
      http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/
    • Lava Quod est Sordidium
      ... Thanks for all the great documentation! As I said in the previous post by the time you could actually /buy/ soap it was regulated by guilds and controlled
      Message 2 of 6 , May 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        > Is this really the case? With references to hand I can
        > easily
        > find a number of references to men making soap:


        Thanks for all the great documentation!
        As I said in the previous post by the time you could actually /buy/ soap it was regulated by guilds and controlled by men. All the documentation you have cited is from after that time. Merchants have been around a lot longer than people want to admit.

        A~
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.