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forks (was: Feast Gear)

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  • Coblaith Muimnech
    ... Out of period (like period ) is meaningful only if presented in context. Forks are out of period for 10th century Ireland. They re out of period for
    Message 1 of 32 , Jan 16, 2009
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      Lady Maria wrote:
      > . . .If one more person says forks are out of period I'm gonna
      > explode. They are NOT out of period!!!!! 

      "Out of period" (like "period") is meaningful only if presented in
      context. Forks are out of period for 10th century Ireland. They're
      out of period for 12th century Spain. They're out of period for 14th
      century Germany. They're out of period for 16th century England.
      They're out of period virtually anywhere in Europe, any time in the
      pre-17th century Middle Ages and Renaissance.

      > Look at the artifacts that came out of Pompeii. They had forks.

      If you're right, that makes some form of fork period for those whose
      personae are from first-century Campania. I'd have to see your sources
      to be convinced they were used to insert food directly into diners'
      mouths, of course. (That's not how the first forks to make their way
      into Europe from the east were used
      <http://www.hospitalityguild.com/History/
      Table_Forks_of_the_Medieval&Renaissance.htm>.) And we'd have to look
      at photos or dig reports to see how they were shaped and how big they
      were. I'm betting it wasn't much like anything at your local discount
      mart.

      Billy and Charlie sell a couple of reproductions of 15th-century forks
      <http://www.billyandcharlie.com/misc.html>. If your persona is part of
      the small minority for whom forks are appropriate, it's likely the
      forks (s)he would've used would have resembled those.


      Coblaith Muimnech
      Barony of Bryn Gwlad
      Kingdom of Ansteorra
      <mailto:Coblaith@...>
    • Callahan Patrick
      As far as I know nothing designates it as Yul . This lady simply had her feast gear at the Yul is what I heard her to say. For my T W O pence worth
      Message 32 of 32 , Jan 18, 2009
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        As far as I know nothing designates it as 'Yul'. This lady simply had her feast gear at the 'Yul' is what I heard her to say. For my T W O pence worth or were they ducats:(I promise you I know nothing of Irish money) I believe the Irish like the peoples in the Norse lands were slow to adopt the fork. The Irish seem despite their proximity to have been fairly cut off from the goings on in Europe and were slow in adopting anything European preferring to continue their Gaelic traditions in stead.


        Kreyze Padreyk
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