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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Patterns

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  • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
    ... I m going to assume that by costumes you mean clothing to wear at S.C.A. events and not costumes that someone living before 1600 might have worn to a
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 10, 2008
      > Where can I find sewing patterns for SCA costumes

      I'm going to assume that by "costumes" you mean "clothing to wear at
      S.C.A. events" and not "costumes that someone living before 1600 might
      have worn to a masquerade, carnival, etc." If that assumption is
      incorrect (and with the number of branches that have costumed
      12th-night parties coming up, it certainly might be) let us know. For
      future reference, most SCAdians refer to clothing for events as "garb".


      Reconstructing History
      <http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/index.php?c=22&w=24&r=Y> offers
      well-researched patterns from the 15th and 16th centuries.

      Margo Anderson's Historic Costume Patterns
      <http://www.margospatterns.com/> offers well-documented patterns for
      Elizabethan upper class men and women and lower class women.

      Burda has a reasonably accurate pattern for a sideless surcoat with a
      matching underdress for women (number 7977)
      <http://www.burdafashion.com/en/Patterns/Main_Collection/
      7977_Historic_Dress/1270778-1128998-1003047-1392667.html>.


      It is also quite possible to make beautiful and accurate clothing
      without a printed pattern. Newcomers are often encouraged to begin
      with simple tunics, made using rectangular construction methods
      <http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/cloth/tunics.html>. They
      were worn from the beginning of the core SCA millennium almost to the
      end, all over Europe (with some variations in details like the shapes
      of sleeves and necklines and the placement and type of trim). They're
      appropriate to gentles of both sexes and all ages. (Anyone can wear
      one floor-length. Male personae may also wear shorter ones.) They're
      economical of fabric and easy to make and to dress up or down.

      Tunics based on the finds classed as "Type 1" by Nockert are the sort
      most commonly made in the S.C.A. There are online several good
      articles on these, each with its own strengths. Jane Stockton's
      "Getting Started with Tunics"
      <http://needleprayse.webcon.net.au/research/index.html> is a good
      overview of how one is put together, with information on plausible
      colors and details you can vary to get a look you like. Reconstructing
      History's "Your First Garb"
      <https://www.reconstructinghistory.com/index.php?d=141> takes a
      slightly different approach to assembly, and has more information on
      fabric choice. And Cynthia du Pré Argent has an interactive worksheet
      <http://www.virtue.to/articles/tunic_worksheet.html> into which you can
      put your measurements to get fabric measurements automatically
      calculated for you. (Click "feed them into this form".)

      There are fewer articles around with details on other types of tunics.
      Barbara L.M. Handley's "The Making of a Greenland Gown"
      <http://www.briaca.com/mygarb/greengown1.html> is based on a Nockert
      Type 4 garment, and Hefdharfru Vigdís Vestfirzka's "Viking/Norse
      Underdress" <http://www.silverdor.org/viking/underdress.html> on
      Nockert Type 5 finds. Sarah Thursfield's articles on early medieval
      dresses and tunics
      <http://www.insulaedraconis.org/documents/FlamePeace/AOP_new/
      stcostume1.htm> and shirts and smocks
      <http://www.insulaedraconis.org/documents/FlamePeace/AOP_new/
      stcostume2.htm> include cutting diagrams for a few different types.

      Just the tunic is enough (for males or females of all ages) for a first
      outfit. If you want a more "complete" look, you might add a hood
      <http://www.virtue.to/articles/hoodlum.html>, or (for a male persona) a
      coif <http://www.virtue.to/articles/coif.html> or (for a female
      persona) a veil <http://www.virtue.to/articles/veils.html>, to keep the
      sun off your head and for that extra dash of authenticity. A plain
      leather belt with a simple buckle, a pouch or satchel (or both) to keep
      your "stuff" in
      <http://moas.atlantia.sca.org/wsnlinks/index.php?
      action=displaycat&catid=288>, and some unobtrusive shoes (or period
      ones <http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOEHOM3.HTM>)
      will round out the look. Those with male personae who are
      uncomfortable in skirts alone may wear hosen or, as early-period
      alternative, trews <http://www.regia.org/members/basclot5d.htm>. (I
      suppose those with female personae could do likewise, but as their
      skirts will fall to the floor, trews or hosen won't show.)


      If you want something more fitted, you can by adding laces to the basic
      tunic make a bliaut
      <http://www.geocities.com/louise_de_la_mare/12th_Century_Bliaut.htm>
      <http://www.eg.bucknell.edu/~lwittie/sca/garb/bliaut.html>.


      Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      Barony of Bryn Gwlad
      Kingdom of Ansteorra
      <mailto:Coblaith@...>
    • Linda hightower
      I tend to aggree with you garb is somthing i would love to wear everyday.. a costume is just something that is worn for say a party . I have found a costume
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 12, 2008
        I tend to aggree with you garb is somthing i would love to wear everyday.. a costume is just something that is worn for say a party . I have found a costume that i am going to turn to garb once i get done with it... lots of things im going to change but i like the way it fits me and i cant sew very well so im taking a zipper out of the back and putting buttons on it ..

        Siobhan



        scanewcomers@yahoogroups.comFrom: skycat@...: Fri, 12 Dec 2008 07:15:07 -0600Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Costume Vs. Garb, was RE: Patterns



        This raises some very good questions for me, as well.Things like which time and region are important for deciding which pattern.If you want a more specific discussion of exactly which patterns, you'llneed to state your choice of same.Also, I have my own idea of the difference between costume and garb; mainlythat costume may pass the 10' rule - looks OK from 10' away, but that garbis clothing, just from a different time and region, but I would very muchlike to hear what other people think is important about the differencebetween costume and garb.Tabitha PennywardenRavenslake, MidlandsMiddle Kingdom-----Original Message-----From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com]OnBehalf Of lizalizfullerSent: Wednesday, December 10, 2008 8:13 AMTo: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.comSubject: [SCA Newcomers] PatternsWhere can I find sewing patterns for SCA costumes[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        ou
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      • svanarose
        Greetings Coblaith, Tremendous list. Ive been making my own garb for over a year now and some sites you listed, i had not found in my research. I meant to
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 23, 2008
          Greetings Coblaith,

          Tremendous list. Ive been making my own garb for over a year now and
          some sites you listed, i had not found in my research.

          I meant to post much of my research and findings here, but relized
          later, all that was on my computer when it crashed. I lost it all. I
          am restocking my research.

          Thank you for the information you have shared.

          Svana
          Kingdom of Trimaris
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