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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Finishing necklines?

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  • Labhaoise O'Beachain
    As you may have noted from my earlier posts, my preference is early period, and my intent was nto to preclude anything but to show 1) breadth of options 2)
    Message 1 of 38 , Jul 9, 2008
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      As you may have noted from my earlier posts, my preference is early
      period, and my intent was nto to preclude anything but to show 1)
      breadth of options 2) primary sources(well secondary actually, as
      I'm looking at photos and discriptions)

      There is primary evidence for drawstring/casing type fitting, but
      there are MANY other ways of producing a garment AND the topic was
      tailoring vs "rustic."

      If you want to tailor, there are plenty of opportunities, but it's a
      different kind than modern, if you want "rustic" well that can be
      done also.

      And never forget, garments from queens and saints are much more
      likely to have been saved, than from maids and merchants, when you
      get to slaves and "sluts" they were lucky to have what they did
      then, mostly it wore out(but see what they found in boat caulking!),
      and there is artists renderings...
      Labhaoise

      bronwynmgn@... wrote:
      >
      > In a message dated 7/8/2008 9:38:19 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      > labhaoise_obeachain@... writes:
      >
      > (Regarding info from Marc Carlson's and Cynthia Virtue's websites):
      >
      > <<Note there are facings on some garments, no casings, elastic or
      > drawstrings in site!>>
      >
      > Certainly there would be no elastic. But Marc Carlson's site is
      focused
      > primarily on earlier garments, and styles which simply never need
      a casing or
      > drawstring, so it's unlikely you would find evidence of one
      there. It does not
      > prove that no garment ever used a casing/drawstring. Note that
      there is a
      > lack of garments from much after 1450, just when styles were
      shifting to the
      > poofier variety that might use drawstrings.
      >
      > Most of the clothes on Cynthia Virtue's site are also things that
      would not
      > require a drawstring due to their styling. The exception is the
      last gown,
      > the Hungarian one from 1520, where the chemise clearly shows the
      poofiness we
      > were discussing earlier, but the enlargement makes it very clear
      this was
      > achieved by pleating the fabric into a band and then doing
      smocking embroidery
      > work over the pleats. I could see, for a less noble version of
      this garment
      > and/or someone who didn't know how to pleat, achieving a similar
      look to the
      > chemise with a square-cut neckline with a drawstring. That does
      not, of
      > course, mean that a drawstring might have been used for this in
      period.
      >
      >
      > Brangwayna Morgan
      > Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
      > Lancaster, PA
    • Labhaoise O'Beachain
      As you may have noted from my earlier posts, my preference is early period, and my intent was nto to preclude anything but to show 1) breadth of options 2)
      Message 38 of 38 , Jul 9, 2008
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        As you may have noted from my earlier posts, my preference is early
        period, and my intent was nto to preclude anything but to show 1)
        breadth of options 2) primary sources(well secondary actually, as
        I'm looking at photos and discriptions)

        There is primary evidence for drawstring/casing type fitting, but
        there are MANY other ways of producing a garment AND the topic was
        tailoring vs "rustic."

        If you want to tailor, there are plenty of opportunities, but it's a
        different kind than modern, if you want "rustic" well that can be
        done also.

        And never forget, garments from queens and saints are much more
        likely to have been saved, than from maids and merchants, when you
        get to slaves and "sluts" they were lucky to have what they did
        then, mostly it wore out(but see what they found in boat caulking!),
        and there is artists renderings...
        Labhaoise

        bronwynmgn@... wrote:
        >
        > In a message dated 7/8/2008 9:38:19 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        > labhaoise_obeachain@... writes:
        >
        > (Regarding info from Marc Carlson's and Cynthia Virtue's websites):
        >
        > <<Note there are facings on some garments, no casings, elastic or
        > drawstrings in site!>>
        >
        > Certainly there would be no elastic. But Marc Carlson's site is
        focused
        > primarily on earlier garments, and styles which simply never need
        a casing or
        > drawstring, so it's unlikely you would find evidence of one
        there. It does not
        > prove that no garment ever used a casing/drawstring. Note that
        there is a
        > lack of garments from much after 1450, just when styles were
        shifting to the
        > poofier variety that might use drawstrings.
        >
        > Most of the clothes on Cynthia Virtue's site are also things that
        would not
        > require a drawstring due to their styling. The exception is the
        last gown,
        > the Hungarian one from 1520, where the chemise clearly shows the
        poofiness we
        > were discussing earlier, but the enlargement makes it very clear
        this was
        > achieved by pleating the fabric into a band and then doing
        smocking embroidery
        > work over the pleats. I could see, for a less noble version of
        this garment
        > and/or someone who didn't know how to pleat, achieving a similar
        look to the
        > chemise with a square-cut neckline with a drawstring. That does
        not, of
        > course, mean that a drawstring might have been used for this in
        period.
        >
        >
        > Brangwayna Morgan
        > Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
        > Lancaster, PA
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