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Given name help

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  • Roger Hays
    I am brand new to the SCA. I have not got my persona down yet other than it will be based in the British Isles. I would like to use the given name of Sterling
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 25, 2008
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      I am brand new to the SCA. I have not got my persona down yet other
      than it will be based in the British Isles. I would like to use the
      given name of Sterling but am having trouble finding reliable
      documentation that it is a period name. Any help would be greatly
      appriciated.

      Thanks
    • Briana Lyn Delaney
      LOL. Our local baroness uses that last name.
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 25, 2008
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        LOL.

        Our local baroness uses that last name.
      • Sara L Uckelman
        ... Reaney & Wilson s _Dictionary of English Surnames_ s.n. Starling dates the name William son of Sterling to 1133-60. -Aryanhwy
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 26, 2008
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          Quoth "Roger Hays":
          > I am brand new to the SCA. I have not got my persona down yet other
          > than it will be based in the British Isles. I would like to use the
          > given name of Sterling but am having trouble finding reliable
          > documentation that it is a period name. Any help would be greatly
          > appriciated.

          Reaney & Wilson's _Dictionary of English Surnames_ s.n. Starling
          dates the name <Willelmus filius Sterling> 'William son of Sterling'
          to 1133-60.

          -Aryanhwy



          --
          vita sine literis mors est
          http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/
        • Roger Hays
          Thanks so much for your help. Just what I was looking for.
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 26, 2008
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            Thanks so much for your help. Just what I was looking for.

            --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Sara L Uckelman <liana@...> wrote:
            >
            > Quoth "Roger Hays":
            > > I am brand new to the SCA. I have not got my persona down yet other
            > > than it will be based in the British Isles. I would like to use the
            > > given name of Sterling but am having trouble finding reliable
            > > documentation that it is a period name. Any help would be greatly
            > > appriciated.
            >
            > Reaney & Wilson's _Dictionary of English Surnames_ s.n. Starling
            > dates the name <Willelmus filius Sterling> 'William son of Sterling'
            > to 1133-60.
            >
            > -Aryanhwy
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > vita sine literis mors est
            > http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/
            >
          • Greenman
            Pirates had “democratic” ways Feb. 22, 2008 World Science staff Pi­rates, like gang­sters and oth­er col­or­ful out­laws, have al­ways held a
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 26, 2008
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              Pirates had “democratic” ways
              Feb. 22, 2008
              World Science staff
              Pi­rates, like gang­sters and oth­er col­or­ful out­laws, have al­ways held a cer­tain ro­man­tic ap­peal for many. Three cen­turies af­ter pi­ra­cy’s “gold­en age,” tales of these sea­go­ing ban­dits still cap­ture ima­gina­t­ions.

              But could pi­rates have al­so offered models of de­moc­ra­tic, con­sti­tu­tion­al go­vern­ment?

              Sur­pris­ing­ly, that’s not very far from the truth, a new study sug­gests. Al­though real-life pi­racy was and is a vi­cious form of or­gan­ized crime, the study found that pi­rates in that era some­how over­came their viler in­stincts to rule them­selves ef­fect­ive­ly through mini-de­mo­cracies.

              The cap­ture of the pi­rate Black­beard, 1718 by Jean Le­on Gerome Fer­ris (1863–1930)

              ---------------------------------
              “Pi­rates could and did dem­o­crat­ic­ally elect their cap­tains,” writes the author, eco­nom­ist Pe­ter Lee­son of George Ma­son Uni­ver­s­ity in Vir­gin­ia. In fact, he adds, pi­rates were bet­ter off in this re­spect than the crews of the mer­chant ships they plund­ered. Those men la­bored under un­elect­ed, dic­ta­tor­ial and some­times se­vere­ly ab­us­ive cap­tains.

              His­to­ri­cal sources also sug­gest pi­rates tended to be scru­pu­lously fair to each oth­er, Lee­son adds.

              Lee­son ascribes these dif­fer­ences in the re­gimes on dif­fer­ent types of ships to dis­tinct sets of in­cen­tives in the situa­t­ions, not to the mor­als of the peo­ple in­volved.

              Lee­son pored over old, of­ten en­ter­tain­ing rec­ords of pi­rate tri­als to un­der­stand pi­rate self-go­vernance through the ban­dits’ own words. The study adds to a small body of re­search ex­am­in­ing the po­lit­i­cal struc­tures of crim­i­nal or­gan­iz­a­tions, Lee­son said.

              In the late 1600s and early 1700s, when pi­rates were at their strongest, they were “a loose con­federa­t­ion of mar­i­time ban­dits” whose num­bers ex­plod­ed along with the trade to the far-flung col­o­nies, Lee­son wrote. Be­cause pi­ra­cy was a cap­i­tal crime, he wrote, it was risky busi­ness—and in­creas­ingly so, as the Brit­ish crown be­came more suc­cess­ful at catch­ing pi­rates. The hang­ings that re­sulted were a reg­u­lar af­fair by the late 1700s.

              But a ca­reer steal­ing valu­ables from oth­er ships could al­so be a luc­ra­tive one. The ques­tion arises: how did gangs of thugs man­age to share these prof­its with­out cheat­ing or kill­ing each oth­er?

              Pirates found a solution in dem­o­crat­ic-style in­sti­tu­tions, Lee­son wrote in his stu­dy, which ap­pears in the De­cem­ber is­sue of the Jour­nal of Po­lit­i­cal Econ­o­my. Part of this so­lu­tion involved “separa­t­ion of pow­er,” he wrote, a prin­ci­ple al­so key to the U.S. Con­sti­tu­tion: di­vid­ing pow­er among se­pa­rate auth­ori­ties to pre­vent any one get­ting too much. The pi­rates did this dec­ades be­fore the Amer­i­can and French rev­o­lu­tions en­shrined those ideas in mod­ern West­ern gov­ern­ments, Lee­son added.

              Pi­rates did make use of all-pow­er­ful cap­tains when they needed to, he wrote: when a pi­rate ship was in­volved in a hos­tile en­coun­ter, the cap­tain wielded ab­so­lute au­thor­ity, to avoid de­ci­sion­mak­ing de­lays.

              But for oth­er situa­t­ions, Lee­son wrote, pi­rates in­stalled of­fi­cers be­sides the cap­tain to han­dle key de­ci­sions. This was part of their “in­dus­tri­ous” ef­forts to “avoid put­ting too much pow­er in­to the hands of one Man,” as Lee­son quo­ted one pi­rate say­ing. Fore­most among these oth­er offi­cers was the quar­ter­mas­ter, who oversaw the ship’s food dis­tri­bu­tion and gen­er­al or­der, Lee­son wrote—two ar­eas of au­thor­ity no­to­ri­ously sub­ject to abuse by reg­u­lar cap­tains. Put­ting these de­ci­sions out­side the cap­tain’s hands was in­tend­ed pre­cisely to avoid that, he wrote. The quar­ter­mas­ter al­so oversaw di­vi­sion of boo­ty.

              Pi­rates al­so en­tered in­to an agree­ment called the chasse-partie that dic­tated the di­vi­sion of boo­ty, ac­cord­ing to Lee­son. In ad­di­tion, they drew up “con­sti­tu­tions” for a voy­age, most of which were in­sti­tu­tion­al­ized as the “Cus­tom of the Coast” or the “Ja­maica Dis­ci­pline” and which were usu­ally fol­lowed scru­pu­lously. These co­vered all as­pects of gov­ern­ment and life on board.

              Self-gov­ern­ment was not for mer­chant ships, Lee­son wrote. These were usu­ally owned by some­one on land, who faced the prob­lem of en­sur­ing that wor­k­ers far from his watch didn’t slack off or steal. The typ­i­cal so­lu­tion was to ap­point a cap­tain with two char­ac­ter­is­tics: some per­son­al in­vest­ment in the ven­ture, and the pow­er to fright­en the day­lights out of would-be shirk­ers. Brit­ish law backed up cap­tains’ ab­so­lute au­thor­ity, in­clud­ing the right to phys­ic­ally pun­ish sailors at will, Lee­son wrote.

              Pirates faced a dif­fer­ent set of in­cen­tives than mer­chant sea­men, Lee­son argued, for one sim­ple rea­son: “pi­rates did not ac­quire their ships le­git­i­mately. They stole them.” With­out be­ing re­spon­si­ble to a land-based ship­own­er, pi­rates were rel­a­tively free, and used that free­dom to en­sure cap­tains did­n’t abuse or cheat them.

              Many pi­rates were ac­tu­ally form­er le­git­i­mate-ship crew­men who had walked away from cap­tain­ly abuse, and were keen not re­peat the ex­pe­ri­ence, Lee­son wrote. “Most of them hav­ing suf­fered form­erly from the ill-treatment of Of­fi­cers, [they] pro­vid­ed thus care­fully against any such Evil now they had the choice in them­selves,” Lee­son quot­ed the pi­rate Wal­ter Ken­ne­dy as tes­ti­fy­ing at his tri­al.

              Al­though pun­ishments for er­rant sailors could be bru­tal on pi­rate ships as well, Lee­son added, they were cod­i­fied and, for larg­er in­frac­tions, sub­ject to crewmem­bers’ vote.

              The way Lee­son de­scribes it, these im­pres­sive or­gan­iz­a­tional achieve­ments seem to have pen­e­trated right in­to the spir­it of pi­rates, af­fect­ing their whole way of do­ing things. Lee­son quot­ed his­tor­i­cal sources in­di­cat­ing that pi­rates showed a lev­el of mu­tu­al fair­ness, hard work and “pride in do­ing things right” sel­dom seen on le­git­i­mate ships.

              “Though it is strange to think about such or­der pre­vail­ing among pi­rates,” Lee­son wrote, there was a sim­ple rea­son for it: they had little choice, as suc­cess de­pended on it. That ex­plana­t­ion is noth­ing new, as Lee­son point­ed out—con­tem­po­rary writ­ings note the same irony, and the same ex­plana­t­ion.

              Mod­ern pi­ra­cy is rath­er dif­fer­ent, Lee­son wrote, and not only be­cause be­cause the ships are no long­er tall and grand. Mainly land-based and short-term in its com­mit­ments, he said, pi­ra­cy no long­er re­quires the same sort of or­gan­iz­a­tion as be­fore. If pi­rates ever had at least one thing that was gold­en to of­fer, it would seem that is no more.

              * * *





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            • Jeff Gedney
              ... Please either link to the original article, or post as text only using a standard font set. I cant read this gobbledy-gook Capt Elias Dragonship Haven East
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 26, 2008
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                --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Greenman <greenman_49@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Pirates had "democratic" ways
                > Feb. 22, 2008
                > World Science staff
                > Pi­rates, like gang­sters and oth­er

                Please either link to the original article, or post as text only using
                a standard font set.
                I cant read this gobbledy-gook


                Capt Elias
                Dragonship Haven
                East Kingdom
                Stratford CT, USA
              • Greenman
                Sorry. Try http://www.world-science.net/othernews/080222_pirates.htm ... Please either link to the original article, or post as text only using a standard
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 26, 2008
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                  Sorry. Try http://www.world-science.net/othernews/080222_pirates.htm

                  Jeff Gedney <gedney@...> wrote: --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Greenman <greenman_49@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Pirates had "democratic" ways
                  > Feb. 22, 2008
                  > World Science staff
                  > Pi­rates, like gang­sters and oth­er

                  Please either link to the original article, or post as text only using
                  a standard font set.
                  I cant read this gobbledy-gook

                  Capt Elias
                  Dragonship Haven
                  East Kingdom
                  Stratford CT, USA









                  ---------------------------------
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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Briana Delaney
                  Skipping over ­ every time worked for me. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 26, 2008
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                    Skipping over ­ every time worked for me.

                    On Tue, Feb 26, 2008 at 10:23 PM, Jeff Gedney <gedney@...> wrote:

                    > --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com <scanewcomers%40yahoogroups.com>,
                    > Greenman <greenman_49@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Pirates had "democratic" ways
                    > > Feb. 22, 2008
                    > > World Science staff
                    > > Pi­rates, like gang­sters and oth­er
                    >
                    > Please either link to the original article, or post as text only using
                    > a standard font set.
                    > I cant read this gobbledy-gook
                    >
                    > Capt Elias
                    > Dragonship Haven
                    > East Kingdom
                    > Stratford CT, USA
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Sandra Rangel
                    LOL! Aerodynamically, the bumble bee shouldn t be able to fly, but the bumble bee doesn t know it, so it goes on flying anyway. -Mary Kay Ash ... Never miss a
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 27, 2008
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                      LOL!

                      Aerodynamically, the bumble bee shouldn't be able to fly, but the bumble bee doesn't know it, so it goes on flying anyway.
                      -Mary Kay Ash

                      ---------------------------------
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                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Jeff Gedney
                      Ok, I know it s been a while, but life has had it in for me lately... Regarding the democracy of Pirates... It is quite probably true that they had a rather
                      Message 10 of 10 , Mar 4, 2008
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                        Ok,
                        I know it's been a while, but life has had it in for me lately...

                        Regarding the "democracy" of Pirates...
                        It is quite probably true that they had a rather polite society,
                        after it's own sort, and were frequently cited as egalitarian... But
                        I think that is more an accident of the lifestyle than it is a
                        conscious choice.

                        When you have a bunch of people of differing cultures, all armed and
                        ready to kill, all crowded together for days on end, In that
                        situation rules and agreeements and especially courtesy in terms of
                        listening and having your voice heard in council becomes more of a
                        survival tool than a nicety.

                        Shipboard life has always had a strong tendency towards rules and
                        exacting social processes, particularly in the channels of
                        interpersonal complaint and social justice, simply for the fact that
                        small resentments become large problems when you cannot escape each
                        other for months and sometimes years on end. Captains who ignore the
                        voice of the smallest of the crew had better be planning on a short
                        term voyage.

                        Furthermore, since many "deep Sea" Pirates like those in the Golden
                        Age of Carribean Piracy (1650 to 1750 - after period, BTW) were thus
                        likely to be sailors who had been a part of, and used to, a highly
                        regimented shipboard life, this adherence to form and courtesy is
                        really not surprising.

                        Politeness and sticking to social forms is, sociologically speaking,
                        a particular indicator of a "society of dangerous people".
                        It's not unlike the unfailing politeness recorded among barbarian
                        tribes by historians like Heroditus, such as Scythian and (later)
                        Hunnic hoardes, and even (much later) the Old US West.
                        You see this same tendency in isolated tribal civilizations as well
                        for much the same reason.

                        Capt Elias
                        DragonShip Haven
                        East Kingdom
                        Stratford, CT, USA
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