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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Re: Opinions needed:

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  • Briana Delaney
    Hadn t gotten over the whole viking thing yet. My Norwegian friend tells me Denamrk still has some Norwegian artefacts today and won t return them. On Fri,
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 22, 2008
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      Hadn't gotten over the whole "viking" thing yet. My Norwegian friend tells
      me Denamrk still has some Norwegian artefacts today and won't return them.

      On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 1:57 AM, evans.knight <evans.knight@...>
      wrote:

      > not gonna lie, the whole convoluted
      > "i-was-born-to-a-noble-family-but-kidnapped-by-
      >
      > gypsies-and-ended-up-in-egypt-but-then-travelled-to-japan-and-became-a-ninja-
      >
      > but-then-was-abducted-by-pirates-and-travelled-to-the-new-world-and-became-an-
      > indian-shaman" backstory makes me want to kill myself.
      >
      > that being said, your story actually seems pretty legit. considering that
      > the Danes were a
      > particularly nasty and pillaging sort.
      >
      > kudos.
      >
      > evans.
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • bronwynmgn@aol.com
      First, give us a time frame. I seem to remember that you wanted to be late period? I think it s reasonably plausible that a nobleman might have raped a farm
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 22, 2008
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        First, give us a time frame. I seem to remember that you wanted to be late
        period?

        I think it's reasonably plausible that a nobleman might have raped a farm
        girl (or at least put her in a position where she wouldn't have much choice in
        the matter), unlikely that he would have carried on a prolonged affair with
        one.

        I think that checking the inheritance laws of the time and place might be
        important here. It's entirely possible that a nephew, brother, or other
        legitimate member of the noble family would have been preferred as an heir as
        compared to an illegitimate daughter. Besides, how sure can the nobleman be that
        he's the father? If he forced himself on the mother, who else might have?
        Or maybe the mother had more than one lover. It is more likely that the
        nobleman would have married again and tried to get a legitimate heir. After all,
        we are talking multiple years here between the death of his wife and son and
        the time when this girl even seems to be expected to inherit. Even if she
        had been declared his heir shortly after the death of the legitimate heir as a
        stop gap measure, she would have been superceded by any later legitimate
        children.

        In the unlikely event that the girl would have been adopted, I find it even
        more unlikely given the Christian precepts of the time that the mother would
        have committed suicide. She might even have been pleased that the daughter
        had a chance to get away from the farm.

        It is extraordinarily unlikely that a girl who was the only heir of a
        nobleman would have been permitted to make a dangerous world tour - the whole point
        of him adopting her was to secure the succession, why would he now allow her
        to go off and risk her life traveling? Certainly it is not a decision that
        she would have been allowed to make on her own, and if she did she would
        likely have been disinherited. I'm not even sure the concept of "making a word
        tour" on coming of age was even conceived of at that time. Even in the eras
        when it was common, after SCA period, it was common for young men only, not
        daughters.

        It is far more likely that, had the girl even been adopted, that she would
        have been kept at home and married young, so that there would be a man to
        administer the estates and deal with the legal and military issues related to the
        inheritance. I'm not familiar with Scandinavian law, but that is almost
        certainly what would have happened in England.

        Overall, I find the accident of birth plausible, but the rest of the tale
        very far off from being even close to historically possible, much less
        accurate. Doesn't mean you can't use it; I've certainly heard even less historically
        plausible persona stories. But if you are looking for a historically
        plausible history to go with your very nice historical name, this isn't it.


        Brangwayna Morgan
        Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
        Lancaster, PA



        **************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
        (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
        2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Briana Delaney
        yes, 1500 s. No the affair was not to be long. It was only a day or two... Hearing of me he kidnapped me though. I wouldn t say I was permitted, so much as
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 22, 2008
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          yes, 1500's. No the affair was not to be long. It was only a day or
          two... Hearing of me he kidnapped me though. I wouldn't say I was
          permitted, so much as ran away for a while. Doesn't mean I didn't lie
          about what happened when I got back either! My mother, I think, was
          already depressed by her situation in life. (Ever reached that "last
          straw" moment?)
          Stop gap yeah...
          And maybe he got married again, and the woman turned out to be
          infertile... or something.
          I may change it up some, but the basic story is what I want.

          On 2/22/08, bronwynmgn@... <bronwynmgn@...> wrote:
          > First, give us a time frame. I seem to remember that you wanted to be late
          > period?
          >
          > I think it's reasonably plausible that a nobleman might have raped a farm
          > girl (or at least put her in a position where she wouldn't have much choice
          > in
          > the matter), unlikely that he would have carried on a prolonged affair with
          > one.
          >
          > I think that checking the inheritance laws of the time and place might be
          > important here. It's entirely possible that a nephew, brother, or other
          > legitimate member of the noble family would have been preferred as an heir
          > as
          > compared to an illegitimate daughter. Besides, how sure can the nobleman
          > be that
          > he's the father? If he forced himself on the mother, who else might have?
          > Or maybe the mother had more than one lover. It is more likely that the
          > nobleman would have married again and tried to get a legitimate heir.
          > After all,
          > we are talking multiple years here between the death of his wife and son
          > and
          > the time when this girl even seems to be expected to inherit. Even if she
          > had been declared his heir shortly after the death of the legitimate heir
          > as a
          > stop gap measure, she would have been superceded by any later legitimate
          > children.
          >
          > In the unlikely event that the girl would have been adopted, I find it even
          > more unlikely given the Christian precepts of the time that the mother
          > would
          > have committed suicide. She might even have been pleased that the daughter
          > had a chance to get away from the farm.
          >
          > It is extraordinarily unlikely that a girl who was the only heir of a
          > nobleman would have been permitted to make a dangerous world tour - the
          > whole point
          > of him adopting her was to secure the succession, why would he now allow
          > her
          > to go off and risk her life traveling? Certainly it is not a decision that
          > she would have been allowed to make on her own, and if she did she would
          > likely have been disinherited. I'm not even sure the concept of "making a
          > word
          > tour" on coming of age was even conceived of at that time. Even in the
          > eras
          > when it was common, after SCA period, it was common for young men only, not
          >
          > daughters.
          >
          > It is far more likely that, had the girl even been adopted, that she would
          > have been kept at home and married young, so that there would be a man to
          > administer the estates and deal with the legal and military issues related
          > to the
          > inheritance. I'm not familiar with Scandinavian law, but that is almost
          > certainly what would have happened in England.
          >
          > Overall, I find the accident of birth plausible, but the rest of the tale
          > very far off from being even close to historically possible, much less
          > accurate. Doesn't mean you can't use it; I've certainly heard even less
          > historically
          > plausible persona stories. But if you are looking for a historically
          > plausible history to go with your very nice historical name, this isn't it.
          >
          >
          >
          > Brangwayna Morgan
          > Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
          > Lancaster, PA
          >
          >
          >
          > **************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
          > (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
          > 2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
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