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  • Staycy
    I am Hesper of Ephesus. I am from Greece. I have been in the SCA for 3 months and am a sustained member. I am i the Shire of Ardanroe, Kingdom of Gleann
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 18 7:36 PM
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      I am Hesper of Ephesus. I am from Greece. I have been in the SCA for
      3 months and am a sustained member. I am i the Shire of Ardanroe,
      Kingdom of Gleann Ahbann. I could really use newbie help. I am hoping
      to register my name, but most of the people in my area are from
      English, Irish, Scottish, Viking personas, so tracking down help with a
      Greek name is not as easy as I would have hoped. If someone could help
      me with dating names so I can successfully register, I would greatly
      appreciate the assistance.

      Hesper of Ephesus
    • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      Note: I ll be using Unicode fonts in this e-mail. If your mail client can t handle them, I sympathize. But it s the simplest, if not the only, way to get
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 19 12:45 PM
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        Note: I'll be using Unicode fonts in this e-mail. If your mail client
        can't handle them, I sympathize. But it's the simplest, if not the
        only, way to get the actual letters used in the source I'm quoting. If
        you have a word processor or other software on your computer that is
        Unicode-friendly, you might be able to cut this text and paste it into
        a document there to read it.

        Hesper of Ephesus wrote:
        > I am Hesper of Ephesus.. . .tracking down help with a Greek name is
        > not as easy as I would have hoped. If someone could help me with
        > dating names so I can successfully register, I would greatly
        > appreciate the assistance.

        "Hesper" is a shortened form of "Hesperos" (or, rather, "Ἕσπερος"), the
        name of the Evening Star, son of the dawn goddess Eos
        <http://www.theoi.com/Titan/AsterEosphoros.html>.

        According to the site for the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names
        <http://www.lgpn.ox.ac.uk/names/meaning.html>, theophoric names, made
        up of elements of the names of gods coupled with endings meaning things
        like "birth", "gift", and "manifestation", were quite common in
        Classical Greece. Hesperos was likely among those gods so referenced.
        The names in the available volumes of the LGPN
        <http://www.lgpn.ox.ac.uk/publications/index.html> that seem, to my
        uneducated eye, most likely to derive from "Hesperos" include the
        following. (The transliterations are mine, and likely to contain
        errors.)

        Ἑσπερâτος (Hesperatos) 1 in Vol. IIIA, masculine
        Ἑσπεριανός (Hesperianos) 1 in Vol. IIIA, masculine
        Ἑσπερίς (Hesperis) 8 in Vol. IIIA, 1 in IIIB, feminine
        Ἕσπερίτας (Hesperitas) 2 in Vol. I, masculine
        Ἑσπερίων (Hesperion) 2 in Vol. IIIA, masculine
        Ἕσπερος" (Hesperos) 2 in Vol. I, 18 in II, 10 in IIIA, 1 in IIIB,
        and an unknown number in IV, masculine
        Ἐσπρέπεις (Hesprepeis) 1 in Vol. IIIB, masculine
        Ἐσπωνιδεύς (Hesponideus) 1 in Vol. IIIB, masculine
        Ἕσσπερίς (Hessperis) 1 in Vol. IIIB, feminine

        Ephesus seems to fall in the area covered by Volume I--its data are
        drawn from the Aegean Islands, Cyprus, and Cyrenaica. Volumes III A
        and B, whence the two attested forms of the one feminine name come,
        cover the Peloponnese, Western Greece, Sicily, Magna Graecia, and
        Central Greece from the Megarid to Thessaly, collectively.

        You should be aware that these names were collected from sources dating
        no later than the sixth century C.E., and in some cases as early as
        "the earliest Greek written records". Since the LGPN site doesn't give
        dates for specific names, I can't tell you where in that range these
        fall. After the arrival of Christianity in the Greek world, most names
        related to the ancient gods were abandoned, and it is likely that these
        names were among them. The existence of "Hesper" as a modern name does
        not indicate that it was used during the Middle Ages and Renaissance.
        It may simply have been revived in the last century or the one before
        that, during some period where interest in Classical names was high.

        I can try to find a herald experienced in Greek names to aid you, if
        you'd like me to. Judging by the dearth of information in the Medieval
        Names Archive and the limited number of reports in the


        Documenting "of Ephesus" would be a two-step process. First, you'd
        need to establish that "Ephesus" was the name of the town in question
        in the period to which you plan to date your name. Then you'd need to
        establish that "of Ephesus" (or the equivalent in Greek) would've been
        a plausible byname in that period. "Personal Names of the Aristocracy
        in the Roman Empire During the Later Byzantine Era"
        <http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/byzantine/introduction.html>
        supports the use of locatives in the area in the Middle Ages, saying:

        > . . .by the 11th century family names were again pervasive. The early
        > family names from this era are those found among the military
        > aristocracy, and usually are derived from place names in Asia Minor. .
        > ., such as Komenos (from the village of Komne). Names found among the
        > civil aristocracy are derived from trade professions. . ., districts
        > within Constantinople. . ., provincial towns (Choniates). . ., and
        > monasteries. . .. Among commoners, family names are found which derive
        > from crafts. . ., but also some aristocratic names are found, such as
        > Komnenos or Synadenos - possibly reflecting links of dependancy.

        The "lingua franca" rule would probably allow you to register "[a
        documented Greek personal name] of [a documented Greek location from
        roughly the same period]". However, you will note that the locatives
        mentioned in the cited article consist of a single word each (e.g., it
        is "Komnenos", not "of Komne"). It appears that, if you were going to
        use "Ephesus", it would be more authentic to name yourself
        "Ephesutissa" or something rather than "of Ephesus". (Almost certainly
        not literally "Ephesutissa"; I made that up.) Perhaps if you contacted
        the author of the article, he could assist you in determining how a
        locative meaning "of Ephesus" would've been constructed.


        It would be much easier, of course, to start with lists of documented
        names from which you can choose elements, rather than trying to "stunt
        document" name elements you found in modern sources. The article
        mentioned above and the others in the Medieval Naming Guide for Greek
        names <http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/greek.shtml> would be a good
        place to start.


        Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        Barony of Bryn Gwlad
        Kingdom of Ansteorra
        <mailto:Coblaith@...>
      • evans.knight
        of Ephesus is της Έφεσου. also, when referring to artemis as the Lady of Ephesus, her name is prefaced with
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 19 1:39 PM
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          "of Ephesus" is της Έφεσου.

          also, when referring to artemis as the "Lady of Ephesus," her name is prefaced with Εφέσια.
          but I don't know if that would be appropriate to do with a human.


          evans.
        • Staycy
          Sir, I would GREATLY appreciate any help you can provide in documenting my chosen name. Anyone with experience with Greece would be a wonderful help. This is
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 25 5:50 PM
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            Sir,

            I would GREATLY appreciate any help you can provide in documenting my
            chosen name. Anyone with experience with Greece would be a wonderful
            help. This is a lot more overwhelming that I originally would have
            thought especially if I have to research in a language, and alphabet
            that I am not familiar with.

            My main concern is with "Hesper." I can change "of Ephesus" with
            little concern, but "Hesper" is what I need to document.

            Graciously,

            Hesper of Ephesus

            PS: I did show your post to some of the officers in my shire and they
            stated that evem though they did not know you, they have seen your name
            quite a bit in Heraldry sites.
          • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
            A gentle using Hesper of Ephesus as an S.C.A. name asked for assistance documenting it. ... I ll reply off-line, to get a few more details from you, and then
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 26 12:21 PM
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              A gentle using "Hesper of Ephesus" as an S.C.A. name asked for
              assistance documenting it.

              I sent the info I could readily finds, and wrote:
              > I can try to find a herald experienced in Greek names to aid you, if
              > you'd like me to.

              said gentle answered:
              > I would GREATLY appreciate any help you can provide in documenting my
              > chosen name. Anyone with experience with Greece would be a wonderful
              > help.

              I'll reply off-line, to get a few more details from you, and then set
              out to look for someone who can help.


              Coblaith Mhuimhneach
              Barony of Bryn Gwlad
              Kingdom of Ansteorra
              <mailto:Coblaith@...>
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