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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Persona and Time Period

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  • bronwynmgn@aol.com
    In a message dated 12/22/2007 11:56:27 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, mysticaldreamer1963@yahoo.com writes:
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 23, 2007
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      In a message dated 12/22/2007 11:56:27 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      mysticaldreamer1963@... writes:

      <<Does anyone know if there is a persona/culture and time period for a
      person such as myself that has many Art and Sciences interests such as:
      needlepoint,embroidery,knitting,crocheting and some weaving? Just
      looking for somewhat of an idea to help me condense my search efforts.I
      thank anyone that has information and your efforts are greatly
      appreciated.>>

      My first suggestion is not to get hooked on the idea that your persona's
      culture and time period must explain all of your interests or activities in the
      SCA. That way lies either "doomed to frustration" or increasingly extreme
      persona stories where you end up shipwrecked on a Japanese island when you
      decide to learn kumihimo, even though you are from 1300's France when hardly
      anyone in Europe even knew Japan existed and there weren't any ships traveling
      that way.

      My take on this is that, while you brought a certain skill set to the SCA
      from wherever your persona's home is, you have learned new skills from the
      people here who all come from different places. Which is how my husband, a late
      14th century Lowland Scot tailor, knows how to make Elizabethan clothing - he
      didn't learn that at home, he learned it here in the Known World.


      Fortunately, your list of interests above is, by SCA terms, pretty narrowly
      focused (they are all fiber arts, after all), and you can probably find a
      time/culture to fit in the embroidery, knitting, and weaving easily. Crochet as
      it exists today is an out of period skill, although there is a technique
      called nalbinding that is so similar in the finished product that it is hard to
      tell the two apart. I am honestly not sure about needlepoint and how far
      back it goes, although I suspect you are looking towards a later period persona
      with the knitting anyway. But then nalbinding is, I think an earlier period
      technique that didn't necessarily continue...see what I mean?

      Brangwayna Morgan
      Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
      Lancaster, PA




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