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  • Thareth
    i m making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can someone tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does anyone know where i can find other period
    Message 1 of 23 , Sep 18, 2007
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      i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can someone
      tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does anyone know where i can
      find other period patterns?
    • jackdoph2526
      Tea bag dying is probably the easiest way to do it. take the tunic and soak it thoroughly in hot water, then add a whole lot of tea bags let it soak for
      Message 2 of 23 , Sep 18, 2007
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        Tea bag dying is probably the easiest way to do it. take the tunic
        and soak it thoroughly in hot water, then add a whole lot of tea bags
        let it soak for overnight or longer and then wring it out, rinse and
        dry. there are more instructions on the internet, but that's the
        basics of it. it'll be a cream to tan color depending on how long you
        soak it and how strong the tea is. you should take a piece of scrap
        material you used to make it and try dying that first.

        --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Thareth" <tdragonclaw18@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can someone
        > tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does anyone know where i can
        > find other period patterns?
        >
      • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        ... You might join or at least make use of the reading list of the Natural Dyes Mailing List . The SCA Natural
        Message 3 of 23 , Sep 18, 2007
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          Thareth wrote:
          > i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can someone
          > tell me some easy ways to make dye?

          You might join or at least make use of the reading list of the Natural
          Dyes Mailing List <http://www.marariley.net/dyelist/dyelist.htm>. The
          SCA Natural Dyes Yahoo! Group
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA_NaturalDyes/> would also be a good
          place to go for information, especially if you're interested in
          learning to use dyestuffs that your persona would've used (or that
          would've been used by the people who dyed the cloth your persona wore).

          Of course, if you just want to add color to something, you don't
          necessarily have to make your own. It's easier to get consistent
          results with commercial dyes. Dharma Trading Company
          <http://dharmatrading.com/html/eng/2934904-AA.shtml> is a good source,
          and their website includes a lot of information on what's involved in
          using various products. (Look at naturally-dyed fibers, like the color
          chart on the Golden Gryphon site
          <http://www.goldgryph.com/threads.htm>, to get an idea of the sort of
          shades that are plausible for the Middle Ages and Renaissance.) Dharma
          even has a small selection of plant, animal, and mineral dyes, though
          specialty providers like Griffin Dyeworks
          <http://www.griffindyeworks.com> and Earthues
          <http://www.earthues.com/Catalog.html> offer more.

          The least easy (but possibly most fun, if you're into it) route is to
          collect your own raw materials. For that, the first step would be to
          read a couple of the aforementioned books, to learn what to collect and
          how to process and use it.



          Coblaith Mhuimhneach
          Barony of Bryn Gwlad
          Kingdom of Ansteorra
          <mailto:Coblaith@...>
        • Labhaoise O'Beachain
          There are dozens of companies that produce comercial dyes. With a little knowledge of colors that were produced in your period and reading to see which dyes
          Message 4 of 23 , Sep 19, 2007
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            There are dozens of companies that produce comercial dyes. With a
            little knowledge of colors that were produced in your period and
            reading to see which dyes will work with your fabric, you should have
            no problem.

            If you want to use natural dyes, there are any number of common items
            that can be used to dye fabric. You would need to do a little
            research to deterime exactly what would be available in your time and
            place. You also need to look into, whether it will work on the fabric
            you are dying, what mordants, fixers, etc are needed, water temps,
            how it is set, and so on.

            But you can dye yellows and browns for the onion skins out of the
            fridge. Beets are a no-brainer. Take a walk and pick up some of the
            walnuts, which produce a lovely DARK brown(careful, they'll give YOU
            a "tan", too!) Have access to clay soil? You can get reds, oranges,
            browns, and yellows. Many lichens will give you a purple, and are
            available in your backyard!

            Oh, whatever you use, wash, wash, wash! Absolutely no oils and
            finishing products should be on the fabric when you start. And don't
            forget something was done to the fabric to make it white to start
            with.

            Labhaoise

            --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Thareth" <tdragonclaw18@...>
            wrote:
            > i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can
            someone
            > tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does anyone know where i
            can
            > find other period patterns?
          • Dave
            Plant dyes are on average notorious for fading quickly. I strongly recommend that you use some of the resources already given to you before you use dyes based
            Message 5 of 23 , Sep 19, 2007
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              Plant dyes are on average notorious for fading quickly. I strongly recommend that you use some of the resources already given to you before you use dyes based on plants. There are some that are fantastic and don't run but they are the exception and not the rule.

              Ian the Green


              Some SCA Pictures

              http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianthegreen

              ---------------------------------
              Don't let your dream ride pass you by. Make it a reality with Yahoo! Autos.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kyla
              Is tea dying period to anywhere except China? I thought the import of tea didn t really begin until just after our period. Before that it would have been too
              Message 6 of 23 , Sep 19, 2007
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                Is tea dying period to anywhere except China? I thought the import of tea
                didn't really begin until just after our period.
                Before that it would have been too precious to use as dye. Wouldn't it?

                Kyla Pennywarden
                Ravenslake, Midlands,
                Middle Kingdom

                P.S. It would be very much appreciated if people would include things like
                their names and kingdoms, for those of us who don't recognise every email
                address yet. Also, when asking questions, it helps if people include
                essential information, like when and where your persona is from.
                That would help the people trying to give answers a better idea of what the
                people asking questions might be looking for.

                Thanks.

                -----Original Message-----
                From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com]On
                Behalf Of jackdoph2526
                Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2007 1:14 AM
                To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: dye


                Tea bag dying is probably the easiest way to do it. take the tunic
                and soak it thoroughly in hot water, then add a whole lot of tea bags
                let it soak for overnight or longer and then wring it out, rinse and
                dry. there are more instructions on the internet, but that's the
                basics of it. it'll be a cream to tan color depending on how long you
                soak it and how strong the tea is. you should take a piece of scrap
                material you used to make it and try dying that first.

                --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Thareth" <tdragonclaw18@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can someone
                > tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does anyone know where i can
                > find other period patterns?
                >






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Pardus
                You know, I m no expert, but there is such a thing as permanent stains, right? So you could soak that tunic in tomato paste for a red color maybe? Now I m
                Message 7 of 23 , Sep 19, 2007
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                  You know, I'm no expert, but there is such a thing as permanent stains,
                  right? So you could soak that tunic in tomato paste for a red color maybe?

                  Now I'm from Georgia where we have a surplus of Red Clay. I just bet
                  you could get a nice orange/brown earthy tone just by rolling in the mud
                  on a rainy day.

                  It may sound silly, but colors is colors!

                  - Pardus.

                  Thareth wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can someone
                  > tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does anyone know where i can
                  > find other period patterns?
                • Bulgarelli Maria
                  Actually tea would have been imported as early as Marco Polo s time. He traveled to China. So he d have brought back tea. Maria
                  Message 8 of 23 , Sep 19, 2007
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                    Actually tea would have been imported as early as
                    Marco Polo's time. He traveled to China. So he'd
                    have brought back tea.

                    Maria
                    --- Kyla <skycat@...> wrote:

                    > Is tea dying period to anywhere except China? I
                    > thought the import of tea
                    > didn't really begin until just after our period.
                    > Before that it would have been too precious to use
                    > as dye. Wouldn't it?
                    >
                    > Kyla Pennywarden
                    > Ravenslake, Midlands,
                    > Middle Kingdom
                    >
                    > P.S. It would be very much appreciated if people
                    > would include things like
                    > their names and kingdoms, for those of us who don't
                    > recognise every email
                    > address yet. Also, when asking questions, it helps
                    > if people include
                    > essential information, like when and where your
                    > persona is from.
                    > That would help the people trying to give answers a
                    > better idea of what the
                    > people asking questions might be looking for.
                    >
                    > Thanks.
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                    > [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com]On
                    > Behalf Of jackdoph2526
                    > Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2007 1:14 AM
                    > To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: dye
                    >
                    >
                    > Tea bag dying is probably the easiest way to do
                    > it. take the tunic
                    > and soak it thoroughly in hot water, then add a
                    > whole lot of tea bags
                    > let it soak for overnight or longer and then wring
                    > it out, rinse and
                    > dry. there are more instructions on the internet,
                    > but that's the
                    > basics of it. it'll be a cream to tan color
                    > depending on how long you
                    > soak it and how strong the tea is. you should take
                    > a piece of scrap
                    > material you used to make it and try dying that
                    > first.
                    >
                    > --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Thareth"
                    > <tdragonclaw18@...>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try
                    > dyeing it. can someone
                    > > tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does
                    > anyone know where i can
                    > > find other period patterns?
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                    > removed]
                    >
                    >
                  • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                    ... Marco Polo saw a lot of things in China that he didn t start importing as soon as he got home. Every article I found online that cited sources for its
                    Message 9 of 23 , Sep 20, 2007
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                      Kyla Pennywarden wrote:
                      > I thought the import of tea didn't really begin until just after our
                      > period. Before that it would have been too precious to use as dye.
                      > Wouldn't it?

                      Maria wrote:
                      > Actually tea would have been imported as early as Marco Polo's time.
                      > He traveled to China. So he'd have brought back tea.

                      Marco Polo saw a lot of things in China that he didn't start importing
                      as soon as he got home.

                      Every article I found online that cited sources for its information on
                      the topic indicates tea was unknown in Europe before the late 16th
                      century, and not widely used or imported in quantity before the middle
                      of the 17th
                      <http://www.spamula.net/col/archives/2005/11/introduction_of.html>,
                      <http://www.kakuzo.com/tea_leaves.html>.


                      Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                      Barony of Bryn Gwlad
                      Kingdom of Ansteorra
                      <mailto:Coblaith@...>
                    • Kristine Elliott
                      I would assume that tea dyeing was suggested as a modern solution to the problem, rather than as a medieval one. Once the clothing is dyed, no one will know
                      Message 10 of 23 , Sep 20, 2007
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                        I would assume that tea dyeing was suggested as a modern solution to
                        the problem, rather than as a medieval one. Once the clothing is dyed,
                        no one will know what dye was used.

                        Scolastica
                        --
                        http://www.geocities.com/souriete/

                        If you can't get rid of them ugly old skeletons in the closet, at least teach
                        'em how to dance funny. Billy C. Wirtz



                        On 9/19/07, Kyla <skycat@...> wrote:
                        > Is tea dying period to anywhere except China? I thought the import of tea
                        > didn't really begin until just after our period.
                        > Before that it would have been too precious to use as dye. Wouldn't it?
                        >
                        > Kyla Pennywarden
                        > Ravenslake, Midlands,
                        > Middle Kingdom
                        >
                        > P.S. It would be very much appreciated if people would include things like
                        > their names and kingdoms, for those of us who don't recognise every email
                        > address yet. Also, when asking questions, it helps if people include
                        > essential information, like when and where your persona is from.
                        > That would help the people trying to give answers a better idea of what the
                        > people asking questions might be looking for.
                        >
                        > Thanks.
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com]On
                        > Behalf Of jackdoph2526
                        > Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2007 1:14 AM
                        > To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: dye
                        >
                        >
                        > Tea bag dying is probably the easiest way to do it. take the tunic
                        > and soak it thoroughly in hot water, then add a whole lot of tea bags
                        > let it soak for overnight or longer and then wring it out, rinse and
                        > dry. there are more instructions on the internet, but that's the
                        > basics of it. it'll be a cream to tan color depending on how long you
                        > soak it and how strong the tea is. you should take a piece of scrap
                        > material you used to make it and try dying that first.
                        >
                        > --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Thareth" <tdragonclaw18@...>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can someone
                        > > tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does anyone know where i can
                        > > find other period patterns?
                      • Bulgarelli Maria
                        I stand corrected. I just looked it up on foodtimeline.org and found this ... Tea Comes to Europe When tea finally arrived in Europe, Elizabeth I had more
                        Message 11 of 23 , Sep 20, 2007
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                          I stand corrected. I just looked it up on
                          foodtimeline.org and found this ...

                          "Tea Comes to Europe

                          When tea finally arrived in Europe, Elizabeth I had
                          more years to live, and Rembrandt was only six years
                          old. Because of the success of the Dutch navy in the
                          Pacific, tea became very fashionable in the Dutch
                          capital, the Hague. This was due in part to the high
                          cost of the tea (over $100 per pound) which
                          immediately made it the domain of the wealthy. Slowly,
                          as the amount of tea imported increased, the price
                          fell as the volume of sale expanded. Initially
                          available to the public in apothecaries along with
                          such rare and new spices as ginger and sugar, by 1675
                          it was available in common food shops throughout
                          Holland.

                          As the consumption of tea increased dramatically in
                          Dutch society, doctors and university authorities
                          argued back and forth as to the negative and/or
                          positive benefits of tea. Known as "tea heretics", the
                          public largely ignored the scholarly debate and
                          continued to enjoy their new beverage though the
                          controversy lasted from 1635 to roughly 1657.
                          Throughout this period France and Holland led Europe
                          in the use of tea.

                          As the craze for things oriental swept Europe, tea
                          became part of the way of life. The social critic
                          Marie de Rabutin-Chantal, the Marquise de Seven makes
                          the first mention in 1680 of adding milk to tea.
                          During the same period, Dutch inns provided the first
                          restaurant service of tea. Tavern owners would furnish
                          guests with a portable tea set complete with a heating
                          unit. The independent Dutchman would then prepare tea
                          for himself and his friends outside in the tavern's
                          garden. Tea remained popular in France for only about
                          fifty years, being replaced by a stronger preference
                          for wine, chocolate, and exotic coffees. "

                          It quite clearly states that tea was known in Europe
                          when Elizabeth I was alive, but it was not widely
                          known til the 1600's.

                          Thank you Coblaith.

                          Maria
                          --- Coblaith Mhuimhneach <Coblaith@...>
                          wrote:

                          > Kyla Pennywarden wrote:
                          > > I thought the import of tea didn't really begin
                          > until just after our
                          > > period. Before that it would have been too
                          > precious to use as dye.
                          > > Wouldn't it?
                          >
                          > Maria wrote:
                          > > Actually tea would have been imported as early as
                          > Marco Polo's time.
                          > > He traveled to China. So he'd have brought back
                          > tea.
                          >
                          > Marco Polo saw a lot of things in China that he
                          > didn't start importing
                          > as soon as he got home.
                          >
                          > Every article I found online that cited sources for
                          > its information on
                          > the topic indicates tea was unknown in Europe before
                          > the late 16th
                          > century, and not widely used or imported in quantity
                          > before the middle
                          > of the 17th
                          >
                          <http://www.spamula.net/col/archives/2005/11/introduction_of.html>,
                          >
                          > <http://www.kakuzo.com/tea_leaves.html>.
                          >
                          >
                          > Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                          > Barony of Bryn Gwlad
                          > Kingdom of Ansteorra
                          > <mailto:Coblaith@...>
                          >
                          >
                        • Labhaoise O'Beachain
                          Pardus, Having grown up with pants and undies red in the back, white in the front. I can assure you that GA clay will die just great. And, if you go out west,
                          Message 12 of 23 , Sep 20, 2007
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                            Pardus,

                            Having grown up with pants and undies red in the back, white in the
                            front. I can assure you that GA clay will die just great.

                            And, if you go out west, they charge BIG BUCKS for fabric died in CO
                            and AZ clay!

                            Labhaoise

                            --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, Pardus <Shadocat@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > You know, I'm no expert, but there is such a thing as permanent
                            stains,
                            > right? So you could soak that tunic in tomato paste for a red
                            color maybe?
                            >
                            > Now I'm from Georgia where we have a surplus of Red Clay. I just
                            bet
                            > you could get a nice orange/brown earthy tone just by rolling in
                            the mud
                            > on a rainy day.
                            >
                            > It may sound silly, but colors is colors!
                            >
                            > - Pardus.
                            >
                            > Thareth wrote:
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can
                            someone
                            > > tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does anyone know where i
                            can
                            > > find other period patterns?
                            >
                          • David Roland
                            Dye, Ink and Paint oh My. What is the difference between these three? Dye s fundamentally change the material they interact with. IE they STAIN them. Paint
                            Message 13 of 23 , Sep 20, 2007
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                              Dye, Ink and Paint oh My.

                              What is the difference between these three? Dye's fundamentally
                              change the material they interact with. IE they STAIN them. Paint
                              merely sits on the surface and ink is an intermediary substance both
                              slightly changing what it is on and sitting on top of it. (Yes, these
                              are simplified explanations and therefor not exact)

                              I make ink from period recipes but the first step in making the inks I
                              make is to first make a dye. I don't claim to be an expert on dyes
                              but I know a little.

                              First of all be careful. They're dye's after all and YOU are a surface
                              material as are the clothes you are wearing. Period dyes CAN be toxic
                              which isn't to say that all are. Make sure you know what the
                              ingredients are. I recommend using non-period latex gloves,
                              disposable or even the kitchen rubber gloves work. If you find out
                              that you are working with something potentially toxic, even in only
                              small amounts, take the appropriate precautions. Its okay to use non-
                              period protection against period poisons (toxins).

                              That said, dyes from in period that come from minerals are very long
                              lasting. Dyes from plants general aren't (I think one exception here
                              is Woad a beautiful bright blue and very period) Here is a link to
                              that process. Be careful and find out if growing or live woad is
                              LEGAL in your area as it is a very aggressive weed. And many places
                              have outlawed growing it except under special "can't get out"
                              conditions.

                              http://my.net-link.net/2E/EB/rowan/Woad%20Page/woadpage.html

                              If you are looking for a brown you can use walnut fruit (NOT the nut)
                              and do just fine with that. However, it is a plant dye and will
                              eventually fade. If you happen to live in an area that has walnut
                              trees you're very lucky. Just go pick up walnuts off the ground,
                              fruit and all (the nut of a walnut is like the seed of a peach. In
                              the middle of the fruit.) You can boil them like they are or let them
                              air dry, store them and boil them later for use. Really the dye from
                              Walnuts is very easy to make and was used apparently all the way back
                              to the ancient greeks. (Which I assure is different than walnut ink
                              which the British Museum experts have told me was never used pre17th
                              century.) Just boil up the walnuts to the brown you like, darker in
                              the pot than you want on the fabric, and then filter out the vegetable
                              matter. Usually cheese cloth is more than sufficient to do that. You
                              literally can make gallons of dye this way pretty easily.

                              The downside is you will have to re dye the garment. The upside is
                              that its easy to make and store so is that really problem? For
                              storage purposes feel free to put in some clove oil as a
                              preservative. If you find some mold growing on the surface of the
                              stored walnut dye, don't fret, its making the dye darker by being
                              there. If you dont' like it, scoop it out with strainer.

                              I hope this is somewhat helpful to you. Remember you don't have to
                              use period dye's to dye your tunic but I commend you for your interest
                              in it.

                              Be safe.

                              Ian the Green
                              Midlands
                              Middle Kingdom




                              --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, "Thareth" <tdragonclaw18@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > i'm making a white basic tunic and want to try dyeing it. can someone
                              > tell me some easy ways to make dye? also does anyone know where i can
                              > find other period patterns?
                              >
                            • Kristine Elliott
                              ... If you chose to use modern dyes, I would assume ALL are toxic unless they are foodsafe dyes, and take the precautions that Ian the Green recommends for
                              Message 14 of 23 , Sep 20, 2007
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                                On 9/20/07, David Roland <mystborne@...> wrote:

                                >
                                > First of all be careful. They're dye's after all and YOU are a surface
                                > material as are the clothes you are wearing. Period dyes CAN be toxic
                                > which isn't to say that all are.

                                If you chose to use modern dyes, I would assume ALL are toxic unless
                                they are foodsafe dyes, and take the precautions that Ian the Green
                                recommends for toxic period dyes.

                                Scolastica

                                --

                                http://www.geocities.com/souriete/

                                If you can't get rid of them ugly old skeletons in the closet, at least teach
                                'em how to dance funny. Billy C. Wirtz
                              • Jennifer Mackay
                                You can use RED onion skins for dye. It will give you a yellow dye. You boil them and strain them out, then dye your fabric. I just took a natural dye class,
                                Message 15 of 23 , Sep 20, 2007
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                                  You can use RED onion skins for dye. It will give you a yellow dye. You
                                  boil them and strain them out, then dye your fabric. I just took a
                                  natural dye class, but we did yarn rather than fabric. You might want
                                  to check how much you need per pound of dye stuff to per yard of
                                  fabric. There's books on natural dye available--check the bookstore or
                                  library.

                                  Gemma Northwode
                                • Signora Beatrice
                                  Greetings from Beatrice. ... I ve always heard that the skins of yellow onions will work, as well. Often, the produce section of your local grocer will let you
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Sep 20, 2007
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                                    Greetings from Beatrice.

                                    --- Jennifer Mackay <mackayjenn@...> wrote:

                                    > You can use RED onion skins for dye. It will give you a yellow dye. You
                                    > boil them and strain them out, then dye your fabric. I just took a
                                    > natural dye class, but we did yarn rather than fabric. You might want
                                    > to check how much you need per pound of dye stuff to per yard of
                                    > fabric. There's books on natural dye available--check the bookstore or
                                    > library.
                                    >
                                    > Gemma Northwode

                                    I've always heard that the skins of yellow onions will work, as well.
                                    Often, the produce section of your local grocer will let you just skim
                                    these out of the bin without charging you for it (but you may get some
                                    funny looks). It's a good way to get dyestuffs without having to buy all
                                    the extra onions.

                                    The yellow produced by onion skins (I've been told) is the yellow that was
                                    used for the Irish leine shirts. They produce a saffron-y color, without
                                    the expense of saffron.


                                    In Service,
                                    Signora Beatrice Domenici della Campana, AoA
                                    Tree-Girt-Sea, Midlands, Middle Kingdom



                                    ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                    Need a vacation? Get great deals
                                    to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.
                                    http://travel.yahoo.com/
                                  • David Roland
                                    Funny adendum to the walnut dyeing method... There was an event here in the Middle Kingdom this past saturday called Fox Hunt. They have a beautiful outdoor
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Sep 24, 2007
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                                      Funny adendum to the walnut dyeing method...

                                      There was an event here in the Middle Kingdom this past saturday
                                      called Fox Hunt. They have a beautiful outdoor site with plenty of
                                      room for Heavy Fighting, Light Fighting, Archery, Merchants,
                                      socializing and of course classes.

                                      My apprentice sister (a female apprenticed to the same Laurel I am)
                                      and I decided to teach a class on walnut ink/dye. The site has a
                                      true plethora of Black Walnut trees there. I stopped counting at 15
                                      and there were at least twice that many more. They grow wild there
                                      and of course the ground was littered with fallen walnut fruits.

                                      We had the kids help us gather the walnuts and we boiled them and
                                      then dyed stuff or turned it into ink. One kid found out that YES,
                                      he was a stainable surface area as he managed to dye his entire arm
                                      from the bicept down a nice caramel brown. (His parents laughed and
                                      told us he always has to learn the hard way. And since its walnut
                                      it wasn't toxic).

                                      But no, the story doesn't stop there.

                                      My apprentice sister took home a large wicker basket of walnuts home
                                      to dry for later use in our ink and dye making that we do. After
                                      some discussion with her husband determined that it would be okay to
                                      leave the walnuts in the garage until this afternoon after having
                                      taken them out of the car only last night. The garage door was a
                                      good seal to the ground with no appreciable gap.

                                      And so when they got home today, the inch and a half thick wooden
                                      garage door had a hole chewed through it. The bushel of walnuts we
                                      had picked up had been decimated by squirrels. The remains of which
                                      had been strewen about the garage and the driveway as well as the
                                      yard. Not one walnut had been untouched. I had to laugh. And
                                      wonder if there was a security camera in the garage that got the
                                      footage of this glut! Alas no there was not.

                                      Moral of the story? Protect your nuts. Put them in a safe place
                                      where the squirrels can't get to them. If you put it where they can
                                      get to them put them in a container they can't open.

                                      Ian the laughing Green
                                      Midlands
                                      Middle Kingdom
                                    • wendy brown
                                      Dear Ian, Have you ever seen the movie...Open Season? The part where the squirrel falls out of the tree and lays there twitching? That s probably what the
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Sep 24, 2007
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                                        Dear Ian,
                                        Have you ever seen the movie...Open Season? The part where the squirrel falls out of the tree and lays there twitching? That's probably what the squirrels in this story felt like doing when they ate all of those walnuts. hee hee hee..plop..twitch twitch

                                        Ælfwynn
                                        Kingdom of Meridies



                                        ----- Original Message ----
                                        From: David Roland <mystborne@...>
                                        To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Monday, September 24, 2007 9:09:41 PM
                                        Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: dye

                                        Funny adendum to the walnut dyeing method...

                                        There was an event here in the Middle Kingdom this past saturday
                                        called Fox Hunt. They have a beautiful outdoor site with plenty of
                                        room for Heavy Fighting, Light Fighting, Archery, Merchants,
                                        socializing and of course classes.

                                        My apprentice sister (a female apprenticed to the same Laurel I am)
                                        and I decided to teach a class on walnut ink/dye. The site has a
                                        true plethora of Black Walnut trees there. I stopped counting at 15
                                        and there were at least twice that many more. They grow wild there
                                        and of course the ground was littered with fallen walnut fruits.

                                        We had the kids help us gather the walnuts and we boiled them and
                                        then dyed stuff or turned it into ink. One kid found out that YES,
                                        he was a stainable surface area as he managed to dye his entire arm
                                        from the bicept down a nice caramel brown. (His parents laughed and
                                        told us he always has to learn the hard way. And since its walnut
                                        it wasn't toxic).

                                        But no, the story doesn't stop there.

                                        My apprentice sister took home a large wicker basket of walnuts home
                                        to dry for later use in our ink and dye making that we do. After
                                        some discussion with her husband determined that it would be okay to
                                        leave the walnuts in the garage until this afternoon after having
                                        taken them out of the car only last night. The garage door was a
                                        good seal to the ground with no appreciable gap.

                                        And so when they got home today, the inch and a half thick wooden
                                        garage door had a hole chewed through it. The bushel of walnuts we
                                        had picked up had been decimated by squirrels. The remains of which
                                        had been strewen about the garage and the driveway as well as the
                                        yard. Not one walnut had been untouched. I had to laugh. And
                                        wonder if there was a security camera in the garage that got the
                                        footage of this glut! Alas no there was not.

                                        Moral of the story? Protect your nuts. Put them in a safe place
                                        where the squirrels can't get to them. If you put it where they can
                                        get to them put them in a container they can't open.

                                        Ian the laughing Green
                                        Midlands
                                        Middle Kingdom






                                        ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                        Got a little couch potato?
                                        Check out fun summer activities for kids.
                                        http://search.yahoo.com/search?fr=oni_on_mail&p=summer+activities+for+kids&cs=bz

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Labhaoise O'Beachain
                                        In the walnut story venue... When I as growing up we had many walnut trees in the area, however, most of the nuts were buggy (YUCK) and as you have noticed All
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Sep 25, 2007
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                                          In the walnut story venue...

                                          When I as growing up we had many walnut trees in the area, however,
                                          most of the nuts were buggy (YUCK) and as you have noticed All that
                                          work to make a good dye or ink, isn't needed if you DON'T want to dye
                                          someting.

                                          So rather than dye everything in sight seperating the fruit from the
                                          nuts, we whould gather them and spread them in the drive (which is
                                          slightly lower than the surrounding land). Then as we came and went,
                                          the trucks drove over the nuts, breaking off the fruit and cracking
                                          the nuts.

                                          Us kids, got the task of gathering, is seperate pails fruit and
                                          salvagable nuts for use.

                                          Yeah, the squirels loved it, running hither and tither trying to pick
                                          out the "best" nuts (however squirels define it). It wasn't unusual
                                          to find squirels sleeping in the drive, on a pile of walnuts, with
                                          not a white hair visible on them!

                                          --- In scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com, wendy brown <cas46per@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Dear Ian,
                                          > Have you ever seen the movie...Open Season? The part where the
                                          squirrel falls out of the tree and lays there twitching? That's
                                          probably what the squirrels in this story felt like doing when they
                                          ate all of those walnuts. hee hee hee..plop..twitch twitch
                                          >
                                          > Ælfwynn
                                          > Kingdom of Meridies
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > ----- Original Message ----
                                          > From: David Roland <mystborne@...>
                                          > To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                                          > Sent: Monday, September 24, 2007 9:09:41 PM
                                          > Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: dye
                                          >
                                          > Funny adendum to the walnut dyeing method...
                                          >
                                          > There was an event here in the Middle Kingdom this past saturday
                                          > called Fox Hunt. They have a beautiful outdoor site with plenty of
                                          > room for Heavy Fighting, Light Fighting, Archery, Merchants,
                                          > socializing and of course classes.
                                          >
                                          > My apprentice sister (a female apprenticed to the same Laurel I am)
                                          > and I decided to teach a class on walnut ink/dye. The site has a
                                          > true plethora of Black Walnut trees there. I stopped counting at 15
                                          > and there were at least twice that many more. They grow wild there
                                          > and of course the ground was littered with fallen walnut fruits.
                                          >
                                          > We had the kids help us gather the walnuts and we boiled them and
                                          > then dyed stuff or turned it into ink. One kid found out that YES,
                                          > he was a stainable surface area as he managed to dye his entire arm
                                          > from the bicept down a nice caramel brown. (His parents laughed and
                                          > told us he always has to learn the hard way. And since its walnut
                                          > it wasn't toxic).
                                          >
                                          > But no, the story doesn't stop there.
                                          >
                                          > My apprentice sister took home a large wicker basket of walnuts
                                          home
                                          > to dry for later use in our ink and dye making that we do. After
                                          > some discussion with her husband determined that it would be okay
                                          to
                                          > leave the walnuts in the garage until this afternoon after having
                                          > taken them out of the car only last night. The garage door was a
                                          > good seal to the ground with no appreciable gap.
                                          >
                                          > And so when they got home today, the inch and a half thick wooden
                                          > garage door had a hole chewed through it. The bushel of walnuts we
                                          > had picked up had been decimated by squirrels. The remains of which
                                          > had been strewen about the garage and the driveway as well as the
                                          > yard. Not one walnut had been untouched. I had to laugh. And
                                          > wonder if there was a security camera in the garage that got the
                                          > footage of this glut! Alas no there was not.
                                          >
                                          > Moral of the story? Protect your nuts. Put them in a safe place
                                          > where the squirrels can't get to them. If you put it where they can
                                          > get to them put them in a container they can't open.
                                          >
                                          > Ian the laughing Green
                                          > Midlands
                                          > Middle Kingdom
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          ______________________________________________________________________
                                          ______________
                                          > Got a little couch potato?
                                          > Check out fun summer activities for kids.
                                          > http://search.yahoo.com/search?
                                          fr=oni_on_mail&p=summer+activities+for+kids&cs=bz
                                          >
                                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          >
                                        • Joanna Ahearn
                                          ... From: David Roland To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, September 24, 2007 7:09:41 PM Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: dye
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Sep 25, 2007
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                                            :-) What a great story, but sorry about your sister losing the nuts-Wow! what determined squirrels!


                                            ----- Original Message ----
                                            From: David Roland <mystborne@...>
                                            To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                                            Sent: Monday, September 24, 2007 7:09:41 PM
                                            Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Re: dye

                                            Funny adendum to the walnut dyeing method...

                                            There was an event here in the Middle Kingdom this past saturday
                                            called Fox Hunt. They have a beautiful outdoor site with plenty of
                                            room for Heavy Fighting, Light Fighting, Archery, Merchants,
                                            socializing and of course classes.

                                            My apprentice sister (a female apprenticed to the same Laurel I am)
                                            and I decided to teach a class on walnut ink/dye. The site has a
                                            true plethora of Black Walnut trees there. I stopped counting at 15
                                            and there were at least twice that many more. They grow wild there
                                            and of course the ground was littered with fallen walnut fruits.

                                            We had the kids help us gather the walnuts and we boiled them and
                                            then dyed stuff or turned it into ink. One kid found out that YES,
                                            he was a stainable surface area as he managed to dye his entire arm
                                            from the bicept down a nice caramel brown. (His parents laughed and
                                            told us he always has to learn the hard way. And since its walnut
                                            it wasn't toxic).

                                            But no, the story doesn't stop there.

                                            My apprentice sister took home a large wicker basket of walnuts home
                                            to dry for later use in our ink and dye making that we do. After
                                            some discussion with her husband determined that it would be okay to
                                            leave the walnuts in the garage until this afternoon after having
                                            taken them out of the car only last night. The garage door was a
                                            good seal to the ground with no appreciable gap.

                                            And so when they got home today, the inch and a half thick wooden
                                            garage door had a hole chewed through it. The bushel of walnuts we
                                            had picked up had been decimated by squirrels. The remains of which
                                            had been strewen about the garage and the driveway as well as the
                                            yard. Not one walnut had been untouched. I had to laugh. And
                                            wonder if there was a security camera in the garage that got the
                                            footage of this glut! Alas no there was not.

                                            Moral of the story? Protect your nuts. Put them in a safe place
                                            where the squirrels can't get to them. If you put it where they can
                                            get to them put them in a container they can't open.

                                            Ian the laughing Green
                                            Midlands
                                            Middle Kingdom





                                            ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                            Catch up on fall's hot new shows on Yahoo! TV. Watch previews, get listings, and more!
                                            http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/3658

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          • Dianne & Greg Stucki
                                            ... I tie-dyed a silk scarf with yellow onion skins and got a glorious intense gold color. It s beautiful. Laurensa
                                            Message 21 of 23 , Sep 30, 2007
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                                              At 06:25 PM 9/20/2007, you wrote:

                                              >I've always heard that the skins of yellow onions will work, as well.
                                              >Often, the produce section of your local grocer will let you just skim
                                              >these out of the bin without charging you for it (but you may get some
                                              >funny looks). It's a good way to get dyestuffs without having to buy all
                                              >the extra onions.


                                              I tie-dyed a silk scarf with yellow onion skins and got a glorious
                                              intense gold color. It's beautiful.

                                              Laurensa
                                            • Dianne & Greg Stucki
                                              ... My son Tommy loves planting things. We have two white oaks in our front yard, so of course we have a plethora of acorns, and the accompanying squirrels.
                                              Message 22 of 23 , Sep 30, 2007
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                                                At 09:09 PM 9/24/2007, you wrote:
                                                >Moral of the story? Protect your nuts. Put them in a safe place
                                                >where the squirrels can't get to them. If you put it where they can
                                                >get to them put them in a container they can't open.
                                                >
                                                >Ian the laughing Green


                                                My son Tommy loves planting things. We have two white oaks in our
                                                front yard, so of course we have a plethora of acorns, and the
                                                accompanying squirrels. The first spring after we moved in, Tommy
                                                rushed around, gathering acorns and planting them in various spots in
                                                the yard. He was, of course, closely watched by the squirrels.

                                                He still doesn't understand why we started laughing when he declared
                                                furiously "Those stupid squirrels keep eating my NUTS!"

                                                Laurensa
                                              • Anetika Roller
                                                Produce departments in grocery stores have more onion skins than you can imagine. The majority of them come off when the clerk opens the bag the onions come
                                                Message 23 of 23 , Oct 1, 2007
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                                                  Produce departments in grocery stores have more onion skins than you can
                                                  imagine. The majority of them come off when the clerk opens the bag the
                                                  onions come in. If you call your store and speak with someone in the
                                                  produce department, they can set you up with more onion skins than you can
                                                  shake a stick at. Most of them go into the trash anyway. When I was a
                                                  produce clerk, onion skins were the bane of my existence. They are really
                                                  hard to sweep up off the floor! I used to save them for a customer all the
                                                  time. I don't know what she was dyeing, come to think of it, maybe she was
                                                  in the SCA! They have lots of red onion skins too, which are also good for
                                                  dyeing things. Good luck, and happy dyeing.

                                                  Constance

                                                  --
                                                  Semper gero sub gero
                                                  Always wear under wear


                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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