Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

creating an Irish Gaelic name (was: a place to start)

Expand Messages
  • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
    ... Documenting a name means showing that it existed in period in the form in which you d like to use it, and that you re using it the same way it was used in
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Erika wrote:
      > while perusing a book entitled "Irish Kings and Their Wars" I had run
      > across a name, which is the earliest reference I had found to my name,
      > it is spelled Earca.

      Documenting a name means showing that it existed in period in the form
      in which you'd like to use it, and that you're using it the same way it
      was used in period (as a personal name if it was a personal name, as a
      byname if it was a byname, etc.)
      <http://sca.org/heraldry/laurel/rfs.html#2>. A history book only makes
      good documentation if it cites the exact form of the name found in
      original documents from the place and time to which you're documenting
      it. For the comfort of modern readers, historians often standardize
      spellings to their modern forms, making their books useless for our
      purposes. (A woman listed as "Yzabels Bontemps" in a 14th-century tax
      role, for instance, might be called "Isabelle Bontemps" in a history
      book.)

      Documentation that a name existed in period needs to come (1) directly
      from a primary source (e.g., the original tax role, marriage registry,
      or birth record) or (2) from a secondary or tertiary source that
      preserves the spellings from primary sources. "Choosing a Society Name:
      Hints for Newcomers"
      <http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/dietmar/hints.html> includes a list of
      characteristics to look for when checking sources, to see whether they
      are likely to be reliable. (It also has a lot of other tips that could
      help you avoid making the most common mistakes people make when looking
      for a name.)

      I did a little quick searching, and the only place I found "Earca" was
      as part of the patronymic "mac Earca"
      (<http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Sin.shtml>,
      <http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/
      Fearghus.shtml>), which would mean that (1) it's used as a masculine
      name and (2) E-A-R-C-A is given as a genitive spelling (analagous to
      "John's" or "Mike's" rather than "John" or "Mike"). I don't know how
      it would be spelled in the nominative, but you'd have to find out
      before you could make it your personal name, it might not look anything
      like "Erika" (of which, by the way, it clearly is not a variant), and
      you'd be constructing a man's name. (Which is fine, if that's what you
      want. Lots of people in the S.C.A. have personae of the sex opposite
      their own.)

      > Now they also have a list of kings whose names I looked through and a
      > common reference used to tell of the clan of the Dal Riata whom
      > migrated to Scotland later and renamed the clan of kings Dalriada in
      > 501 AD.. . .

      The Academy of St. Gabriel is a group of volunteers who specialize in
      researching historic names and naming practices. They are not a part of
      the S.C.A., but their reports can be submitted to the College of Arms
      as documentation, and their expertise is respected. Academy Report
      3326 <http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?3326>
      explains that tribe names beginning with "Dal" were apparently not used
      as bynames in period.

      > What I was hoping for (and am having trouble finding) are the words to
      > bind the names together. I would like the end result to be Earca Linn
      > (decendent of) Dal Riata. The 'decendent of' replaced by the Irish
      > Gaelic equivalent.. . .

      Using both "Earca" and "Linn", even if you can document each
      individually, is not in keeping with historic practice. The evidence
      indicates the Irish Gaels didn't start using double given names until
      after 1600.

      The "words to bind the names together" for a female are "inghean"
      ("daughter of") and "inghean Uí" ("daughter of a male descendent of").
      Unfortunately, those are the only parts of your original idea for a
      name that appear to be viable.

      You'll save yourself a lot of headaches if you stop, right now, and go
      to the Medieval Names Archive guide to Irish and Manx names
      <http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/irish.shtml>. Creating a plausible
      Irish Gaelic name isn't difficult, if you know how to do it. Read
      "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" to learn that. Then move on to the
      articles that list documented names and put your new knowledge into
      action.


      Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      Barony of Bryn Gwlad
      Kingdom of Ansteorra
      <mailto:Coblaith@...>
    • Sara L Uckelman
      ... This is likely completely unrelated to the name . is a modern feminization of the name , which is a late-period Swedish and Norwegian
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Erika wrote:
        > while perusing a book entitled "Irish Kings and Their Wars" I had run =
        > across a name, which is the earliest reference I had found to my name, =
        > it is spelled Earca.

        This is likely completely unrelated to the name <Erika>. <Erika> is
        a modern feminization of the name <Erik>, which is a late-period
        Swedish and Norwegian from of the Old Norse name <Eirikr>. <Earca>,
        on the other hand, is an inflected form of <Earc>, a late-period
        spelling of the early Irish Gaelic masculine name <Ercc> or <Erc>.
        This masculine name was fairly common in early Irish pedigrees.

        > bind the names together. I would like the end result to be Earca Linn =
        > (decendent of) Dal Riata. The 'decendent of' replaced by the Irish=20=20
        > Gaelic equivalent.. . .

        It wouldn't be a good idea to use a byname meaning "of Dalriada".
        So far, no one has been able to find any evidence that bynames based
        on early tribal names, like <of Dalriada> were used by anyone
        other than the rulers of those tribes, so using such a byname is
        tantamount to claiming that you are a ruler of that tribe. While you
        can chose a name which claims rank like this, it's generally frowned
        upon, and such names are not registerable. Here is a precedent that
        the Laurel Queen of Arms set concerning the byname <of Dalriada> which
        explains this:

        "Robin of Dalriada. Name.
        Dalriada was submitted as an English name for a Gaelic kingdom that
        existed from the 5th C to the mid-9th C. Primarily, Dal Riada was the
        name of the tribe who inhabited this area. The name used to refer to this
        kingdom derives from the name of this tribe.
        The fundamental problem with this name is that no evidence has been
        found that any of the Dal tribe names (Dal Riada, Dal Cais, Dal nAriade,
        et cetera) were used in personal names except as part of a ruler's title.
        For example, Donnchadh �� Corr��in & Mavis Cournane, ed., "The Annals of
        Ulster" (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/G100001/), entry U778.7, lists
        "Aedh Finn m. Echdach rex Dal Riati". The phrase "rex Dal Riati" indicates
        that Aedh was king of the Dal Riada.
        Lacking evidence that the name of anyone other than rulers would
        include a Dal tribe name, a byname such as the submitted of Dalriada,
        even in a Lingua Anglica form, is a claim to be a ruler of this tribe
        and so violates [Rules for Submissions] VI.1 "Names Claiming Rank" which
        states that "Names containing titles, territorial claims, or allusions to
        rank are considered presumptuous"."
        (http://sca.org/heraldry/loar/2004/03/04-03lar.html).

        For an early Irish name, you'll want to start off by looking at the
        names in the Irish Annals, specifically:

        "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Feminine Given Names 701 - 1050"
        http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/701-1050.shtml

        -Aryanhwy




        --
        vita sine literis mors est
        http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.