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Easy first garb?

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  • Sarah
    I know everyone recommends the T-Tunic but to be honest I just REALLY don t like them. I haven t done much sewing before so I would like something fairly easy.
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 31, 2007
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      I know everyone recommends the T-Tunic but to be honest I just REALLY
      don't like them. I haven't done much sewing before so I would like
      something fairly easy. My eventual persona will probably be a 16th
      Century English Noblewoman (of French birth) but I don't really want
      to start out with a Tudor style gown as that seems like a pretty
      complicated piece for a beginner to start with. I can sew from a
      pattern but I have no dress form and have never even attempted to sew
      garb from just a picture and/or description (thats a long way off).
      Basically I just want something I can wear to build up to Tudor style
      that is more interesting than a T-Tunic. Thanks, Sarah
    • Signora Beatrice
      Greetings from Beatrice. ... I would _highly_ recommend a rectangular construction t-tunic dress. (not the put a shirt on a folded piece of paper, but with
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 31, 2007
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        Greetings from Beatrice.

        --- Sarah <thswildcats@...> wrote:

        > I know everyone recommends the T-Tunic but to be honest I just REALLY
        > don't like them. I haven't done much sewing before so I would like
        > something fairly easy. My eventual persona will probably be a 16th
        > Century English Noblewoman (of French birth) but I don't really want
        > to start out with a Tudor style gown as that seems like a pretty
        > complicated piece for a beginner to start with. I can sew from a
        > pattern but I have no dress form and have never even attempted to sew
        > garb from just a picture and/or description (thats a long way off).
        > Basically I just want something I can wear to build up to Tudor style
        > that is more interesting than a T-Tunic. Thanks, Sarah

        I would _highly_ recommend a rectangular construction t-tunic dress. (not
        the put a shirt on a folded piece of paper, but with gores and gussetts).
        I own one, have made many for friends and clients, and ADORE mine.

        If that still leaves you cold (emotionally, that is), which it did me for
        many years, you can try a Cotte (aka cotehardie)
        http://www.cottesimple.com/fem_silhouette/intro_fem_silh.html
        http://www.cottesimple.com/fem_silhouette/curved/curved_28.htm

        Italian renn is beautiful, the chemise can be used with tudor as well, and
        pretty easy to make.
        http://www.superstitionmountainmercantile.com/images/itrenn.jpg

        You can also make simple (peasant or middle-class) Tudor, instead of
        starting with the "Tudor" court gowns (how we think of Tudor, usually).
        This is also known as "wench garb", essentially a bodice, chemise, and
        skirt.
        http://tudorshoppe.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000002/apprentice.jpg

        Another option is the so-called "Irish dress" which is a bodice with
        attached skirt, open in the front.
        http://www.moonstruckoriginals.com/irishdressfb.JPG


        Tunics are definately NOT the only way to go.


        In Service,
        Signora Beatrice Domenici della Campana, AoA
        Tree-Girt-Sea, Midlands, Middle Kingdom



        ____________________________________________________________________________________
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      • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        ... Margo Anderson s Historic Costume Patterns has a set of patterns for what she calls the Elzabethan Comfort look
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 1, 2007
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          Sarah wrote:
          > I know everyone recommends the T-Tunic but to be honest I just REALLY
          > don't like them.. . .My eventual persona will probably be a 16th
          > Century English Noblewoman (of French birth) but I don't really want
          > to start out with a Tudor style gown as that seems like a pretty
          > complicated piece for a beginner to start with. I can sew from a
          > pattern but I have no dress form and have never even attempted to sew
          > garb from just a picture and/or description (thats a long way off).

          Margo Anderson's Historic Costume Patterns has a set of patterns for
          what she calls the "Elzabethan Comfort" look
          <http://www.margospatterns.com/comfort.htm>. It's a semi-fitted A-line
          kirtle (which shouldn't be hard to make) and a semi-fitted coat with
          shoulder wings (harder, but manageable). It looks like it would be
          something you could handle now, and it's from the right century. The
          sizes range from 2 to 28.

          Reconstructing History has a similar pattern for a "closed loose gown,
          kirtle, and sleeves"
          <http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/index.php?
          s=&c=22&d=30&w=21&q=1&p=44&r=Y>, as well as another pattern for
          Elizabethan and Jacobean loose gowns
          <http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/index.php?
          s=&c=22&d=30&w=21&q=1&p=42&r=Y> that look a little more complex. Both
          are based on extant garments and fit women with busts measuring 30.5"
          to 48".

          Both companies have excellent reputations for accuracy.


          Coblaith Mhuimhneach
          Barony of Bryn Gwlad
          Kingdom of Ansteorra
          <mailto:Coblaith@...>
        • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
          ... Wench garb is a modern invention, based on 16th-century underwear--the chemise (or smock ) is the basic foundation garment for the period, the only
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 1, 2007
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            Sarah wrote:
            > My eventual persona will probably be a 16th Century English Noblewoman
            > (of French birth) but I don't really want to start out with a Tudor
            > style gown as that seems like a pretty complicated piece for a
            > beginner to start with. I can sew from a pattern but I have no dress
            > form and have never even attempted to sew garb from just a picture
            > and/or description (thats a long way off).

            Signora Beatrice replied:
            > You can also make simple (peasant or middle-class) Tudor, instead of
            > starting with the "Tudor" court gowns (how we think of Tudor,
            > usually). This is also known as "wench garb", essentially a bodice,
            > chemise, and skirt.
            > http://tudorshoppe.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000002/apprentice.jpg

            "Wench garb" is a modern invention, based on 16th-century
            underwear--the chemise (or "smock") is the basic foundation garment for
            the period, the only separate skirts for which I've seen evidence are
            petticoats (the 16th-century equivalent to a half-slip), and the
            "bodice" is like a pair of bodies without the usual support built in.

            If you're interested in what non-noble 16th-century women would've gone
            out in public in, here are some sites to look to:

            Le Poulet Gauche gives a good, brief overview of what's involved in an
            Elizabethan outfit for women of various classes
            <http://www.lepg.org/women.htm>.

            Extreme Costuming's "Working Women's Clothes in 1580s London"
            <http://www.extremecostuming.com/articles/
            womensclothesin1580slondon.html> covers the various elements
            appropriate to the stated period and setting.

            The Elizabethan Costuming Page has an article on Flemish working-class
            dress in the 16th century
            <http://www.elizabethancostume.net/lowerclass/flemish-dress.html>.

            Festive Attyre has another article on Flemish working-class clothing
            <http://www.festiveattyre.com/gallery/flemish/flemish.html>, as well as
            one on Italian working-class clothing based on a painting from the
            1580s <http://www.festiveattyre.com/gallery/campi/wkclass.html>.


            > Another option is the so-called "Irish dress" which is a bodice with
            > attached skirt, open in the front.
            > http://www.moonstruckoriginals.com/irishdressfb.JPG

            This is another modern option. The only period "sources" for this look
            are a couple of sketches by Lucas de Heere that don't really resemble
            it much. You can one of them at
            <http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/history/fig7dress.htm>.


            Coblaith Mhuimhneach
            Barony of Bryn Gwlad
            Kingdom of Ansteorra
            <mailto:Coblaith@...>
          • Jeff Suzuki
            According to my lady (who didn t sew until she began participating in the SCA), T-tunics are actually harder to sew than Elizabethan/Italian ren outfits: they
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 1, 2007
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              According to my lady (who didn't sew until she began
              participating in the SCA), T-tunics are actually
              harder to sew than Elizabethan/Italian ren outfits:
              they have fewer seams, which mean that you can't
              correct any mistakes you make.

              Having sewn a piece of garb or two myself (Elizabethan
              and Japanese), I'm inclined to agree. The *only*
              advantage a t-tunic has is that the pattern is easy.
              Twenty years ago, that was a selling point. Nowadays,
              there are so many patterns out there that the
              t-tunic's disadvantages far outweigh its single
              advantage...

              Jeffs/etc.


              --- Sarah <thswildcats@...> wrote:

              > I know everyone recommends the T-Tunic but to be
              > honest I just REALLY
              > don't like them. I haven't done much sewing before
              > so I would like
              > something fairly easy. My eventual persona will
              > probably be a 16th
              > Century English Noblewoman (of French birth) but I
              > don't really want
              > to start out with a Tudor style gown as that seems
              > like a pretty
              > complicated piece for a beginner to start with. I
              > can sew from a
              > pattern but I have no dress form and have never even
              > attempted to sew
              > garb from just a picture and/or description (thats a
              > long way off).
              > Basically I just want something I can wear to build
              > up to Tudor style
              > that is more interesting than a T-Tunic. Thanks,
              > Sarah
              >
              >




              ____________________________________________________________________________________
              Boardwalk for $500? In 2007? Ha! Play Monopoly Here and Now (it's updated for today's economy) at Yahoo! Games.
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            • Elizabeth Cember
              Cheap dress form better than pretty much any commercial product: http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00002.asp Elspeth I bring myself happiness by
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 2, 2007
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                Cheap dress form better than pretty much any commercial product:
                http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00002.asp

                Elspeth

                I bring myself happiness by surrounding myself with beautiful things;
                I bring myself joy by trying to see the beauty in all things.

                ----- Original Message ----
                From: Sarah <thswildcats@...>
                To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, August 31, 2007 8:35:37 PM
                Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Easy first garb?













                I know everyone recommends the T-Tunic but to be honest I just REALLY

                don't like them. I haven't done much sewing before so I would like

                something fairly easy. My eventual persona will probably be a 16th

                Century English Noblewoman (of French birth) but I don't really want

                to start out with a Tudor style gown as that seems like a pretty

                complicated piece for a beginner to start with. I can sew from a

                pattern but I have no dress form and have never even attempted to sew

                garb from just a picture and/or description (thats a long way off).

                Basically I just want something I can wear to build up to Tudor style

                that is more interesting than a T-Tunic. Thanks, Sarah














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