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Hi, I'm new and need advice

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  • Sarah Natividad
    My name is Sarah Natividad and I am new to medieval re-enactment. I ve hung out with SCA types in the past and I have experience making stage costumes and
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 4, 2007
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      My name is Sarah Natividad and I am new to medieval re-enactment.
      I've hung out with SCA types in the past and I have experience making
      stage costumes and doing all kinds of fiber arts, as well as basic
      herb lore. I love sharing my knowledge. I currently have a business
      making and selling crafts, but I'm looking to expand it into something
      I can make in larger batches, so I decided to try selling my herbal
      wares (and possibly some textile wares, like belts) at SCA events. I
      am not currently an SCA member, but my brother (who will be selling
      with me) is a member of another medieval society that mostly does
      fighting. We'll be making and selling strewing herb blends, and pots
      of herbal salves made with medieval techniques and herbs. We are in
      the kingdom of Artemisia, barony of Loch Salann (Utah). We'll be
      attending our first event the end of this month.

      I need advice relating to costume and etiquette. I've made medieval
      stage costumes before, but I have to costume my entire family (me +
      hubby + 4 kids ages 9 to 1) and even though I'm a perfectionist with a
      thorough knowledge of textile fibers, I really can't afford any
      fabrics much more expensive than a couple of dollars a yard. We can
      borrow some garb from my brother's friend for the kids, but I still
      have to make some for my husband and me, plus extra for my 7 year old.
      (He's diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome but we think he may have OCD
      too, and the idea of a medieval campout where there isn't a sink to
      wash his hands every hour is bad enough for him, let alone not being
      able to change his clothes for 4 days. I think it would be a good
      experience for him though, so we're bringing him anyway.) Anyway, the
      point is that I really don't have a lot of time and money, and I'm
      tempted to take shortcuts like buying one of those commercially
      available "medieval" costume patterns (I can draft my own... IF I can
      get an accurate set of my own measurements...) and using fabrics that
      aren't period (like polyester). I'm aware of the evil properties of
      such fibers, but I'd rather use them than go naked. Also I don't have
      any medieval shoes whatsoever. Would I get in trouble with the Garb
      Police if my kids and I run around in garb and sneakers?

      Also I am concerned about violating etiquette. I'm a generally polite
      person but I'm not used to having to respect rank and address some
      people by a different greeting (e.g. "your excellency") according to
      rank. Any tips as to how one could easily tell what greeting to use
      for which person?

      Thanks,
      Sarah
    • Justinos Tekton called Justin
      ... As a general rule, until you know the actual title: * If they are wearing a crown and being treated like King and Queen by everyone around them, then they
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 4, 2007
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        On Wednesday 04 July 2007 09:31, Sarah Natividad wrote:
        > Also I am concerned about violating etiquette.  I'm a generally polite
        > person but I'm not used to having to respect rank and address some
        > people by a different greeting (e.g. "your excellency") according to
        > rank.  Any tips as to how one could easily tell what greeting to use
        > for which person?

        As a general rule, until you know the actual title:

        * If they are wearing a crown and being treated like King and Queen by
        everyone around them, then they are probably King and Queen, so address
        them as Your Majesty (or Majesties, for plural). They may actually be
        Prince and Princess, but you'll be gently corrected, and you will not
        give offense for accidentally using too high a title.

        * If they are wearing a crown but are not obviously Royalty, then they are
        probably either a Baron(ess), Count(ess), or Duke/Duchess. Technically,
        Duke or Duchess is addressed as "Your Grace" and all the others as
        "Your Excellency". However, "Your Excellency" is perfectly acceptable for
        _all_ of these if you do not specifically know that they are a Grace.

        * Lord or Lady is perfectly correct for all of the rest of us, including
        peers. If someone is introduced to you by title, then by all means use it,
        but otherwise don't worry too much about it. If they are the kind of person
        for whom titles are a big deal, they will inform you of their correct title.
        Most people have other things to worry about.

        Don't let fear of titles and crowns stop you from having fun. Most of the
        time, except for actual Royalty, the titles are used because they make the
        game feel more real, not because the person holding the title demands it.
        "Excuse me, Master Justin, but could you help me move this table?" sounds a
        lot more Middle Ages than, "Yo, Justin, gimme some help schlepping this!"
        (Although in my circle of acquaintances the second is more likely to be heard!)

        Titles only really matter in formal situations such as Court, when scrolls are
        being read or people called forward to attend the Crown's business.

        You can often take your cue from how someone is being addressed when they
        are introduced to you. Consider the following imaginary conversation between
        yourself, me, and the Baroness of Brendoken (the barony where I live):

        Me: Your Excellency, may I present M'Lady Sarah of Newcomerland.
        M'Lady Sarah, this is Catriona nic Hugh McLaey, Baroness Brendoken.
        Lady Sarah is at her very first SCA event, and I'm helping her get
        acquainted.

        Catriona: Hello, Lady Sarah, and well met! I'm glad you could come today,
        and I hope you have fun!

        Now, you have several possible cues to Catriona's title...Baroness or
        Your Excellency. Which one do you use? Answer:

        You: It's an honor to meet you, Your Excellency. [CORRECT]
        You: I'm glad to meet you, Baroness. [EQUALLY CORRECT]
        You: Hello and well met, Baroness Catriona. [EQUALLY CORRECT]

        In email exchanges, take your cue from how they sign their message to you.
        If they sign the email as "Master Foobar", then address them as such in your
        reply. If they sign it as "Foobar", then that's a pretty reliable indication
        they don't care whether or not you use a title in the reply. If in doubt,
        "Lord Foobar" or "Lady Foobar" is correct for anyone whose title is not
        known to you. (Exception: If I receive an email from Her Majesty Fooressa,
        and she signs it "Fooressa", I will still address Her as "Your Majesty" in
        my reply. Similar for Her Highness Fooressa. As with anything else, common
        sense will guide you well.)

        Often, you'll use a title for someone you just met, and they will indicate
        that they prefer informal address. If they say so, you can assume they mean
        it: "Oh, I'm only called Duke Sir Foobar in court. While we're standing here
        washing dishes together, Foobar will be just fine."

        If all else fails, and you're absolutely stumped.... Just be polite, and
        make your speech a bit more formal than usual, and you will sound quite
        forsooth and proper. If they have a crown, call them Your Excellency until
        you know otherwise, if not call them Lord or Lady until you know otherwise,
        and you'll do fine.

        And remember this: It's really all JUST A GAME, no matter how seriously we
        pretend to take ourselves. The greatest King or Queen still has a modern-world
        job with a modern-world boss, and they have to pay tolls on the turnpike,
        and they have to take out the garbage at home. As a wise person once reminded
        us all, "Fill 'er up with unleaded, please, Your Grace."

        I hope this puts your mind at ease. :-) Now go have fun.

        Kind regards, and welcome!

        Justin

        --
        ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::> <::::::::::::::::::[]xxxx()
        Maistor Justinos Tekton called Justin (Scott Courtney)
        Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable and on a chief dovetailed Or two
        keys fesswise reversed sable.

        Marche of Alderford (Canton, Ohio) http://4th.com/sca/justin/
        justin@... PGP Public Key at http://4th.com/keys/justin.pubkey
      • Janet
        ... From: Sarah Natividad To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, July 4, 2007 9:31:53 AM Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Hi,
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 4, 2007
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          ----- Original Message ----

          From: Sarah Natividad <sarah.natividad@...>

          To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com

          Sent: Wednesday, July 4, 2007 9:31:53 AM

          Subject: [SCA Newcomers] Hi, I'm new and need advice



          >>>I really can't afford any
          fabrics much more expensive than a couple of dollars a yard.

          Some 100% cotton would be fine for some beginner garb. My garb is still cotton (all I can afford) almost 3 years into the SCA and no one ever says anything to me.

          >>>We can
          borrow some garb from my brother's friend for the kids

          as a back up, you could make some tabbards for the kids. it's really easy to throw a tabbard over a plain t-shirt and some solid colored shorts. add a belt and ta-da...an attempt at garb...
          (a tabbard is sort of like a medieval vest....it's a rectangle of fabric with a neck hole. i'm pretty sure if you google tabbard, you could find some pics.)

          >>>but I still
          have to make some for my husband and me

          for the husband: a t-tunic (if you search the archives for this list, you will find tons of instructions for t tunics), a belt, and some pants (pj pants or scrub pats from walmart are an excellent quick easy answer). for yourself, a simple t-tunic dress. Just like a t-tunic, but longer. add a belt and you're ready to go.

          >>>plus extra for my 7 year old.
          (He's diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome but we think he may have OCD

          >>>too, and the idea of a medieval campout where there isn't a sink to
          wash his hands every hour is bad enough for him, let alone not being

          >>>able to change his clothes for 4 days. I think it would be a good
          experience for him though, so we're bringing him anyway.)

          first,some sites do have running water, so he may still get to wash his hands sometimes. second, if he really needs to wash his hands and you aren't sure about running water on the site, you might want to look into a jug to take your own water. We always bring this blue plastic 7 gallon jug with a spicket (from walmart for less than $10) full of water for washing dishes and drinking, and whatever else you might need water for. Also, if you haven't already introduced him to antibacterial wipes and/or hand sanitizer, now might be a good time. make him a little pouch he can hang on his belt and he can carry his own little wipe packet or bottle of hand sanitizer. just make sure if he's using wipes, he finds a garbage can to throw away the used ones. (we use the wipes while camping all the time. you never know what you are going to stick your hand in...ewwww...anyway, walmart sells little packages up front near the checkout, or you could visit the baby aisle and get one of the
          small refillable travel containers and a big bag of antibacterial wipes. (wipes are also your savior for sites without showers....lol)

          in regards to outfitting your son, does he have any issues with fabrics or things being too tight or anything? i've heard of people before who had to take their child to the fabric store to pick out something that will feel ok to them. for the garb itself, t-tunics and pants/shorts just like dad, but little...or the tabbards thing will work.

          >>>and using fabrics that aren't period (like polyester).

          again, go with cotton. it's just as cheap as most polyester and far cooler and way less evil properties. :)

          >>>Also I don't have
          any medieval shoes whatsoever. Would I get in trouble with the Garb

          >>>Police if my kids and I run around in garb and sneakers?


          You won't get into trouble for wearing sneakers (especially not the kids), but might i make a suggestion or two....sandals...any plain leather sandals look far more period than sneakers. for you and the girls....if you have some plain simple dress shoes (flats...mary janes, etc) those "blend in" quite well. if you have to wear sneakers, you can also make you and the hubby's garb a bit longer to help hide the shoes.


          >>>Also I am concerned about violating etiquette. I'm a generally polite

          >>>person but I'm not used to having to respect rank and address some

          >>>people by a different greeting (e.g. "your excellency") according to

          >>>rank. Any tips as to how one could easily tell what greeting to use

          >>>for which person?



          When in doubt, if they have a "brass" hat (crown, coronet, circlet) on, bow your head a bit. you can also use "m'lord and m'lady" generically to address anyone in the SCA...if it is the incorrect form for the person and they actually care (many people don't), then they will gently correct you. no big deal. just be polite and use your manners and you'll be fine.

          if anyone gives you a hard time, then politely let them know that this is your first event and ask if they can help you. also, watch what those around you do...if everyone else is bowing or whatever, you might want to bow too....the quietly ask a neighbor what's going on...


          Thanks,

          Sarah













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        • Bulgarelli Maria
          Ok Sarah. First thing I m going to tell you is ... COTTON is your friend. It s cool, natural, and not too expensive. Secondthing I m going to tell you is ...
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 4, 2007
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            Ok Sarah. First thing I'm going to tell you is ...
            COTTON is your friend. It's cool, natural, and not
            too expensive.

            Secondthing I'm going to tell you is ... go to this
            site and look at the simplest T-tunic pattern I've
            ever seen.
            http://hospitaler.ansteorra.org/articles/fip.htm#All%20Purpose%20T-tunic
            The only measurements you need are your bust, waist
            and arm around and how long you want the tunic. You
            can make yours floor length and your husband's knee
            length or shorter and he can wear some pants under it
            (jeans would be ok). Same for your son.

            As for buying material, check out WalMart. They have
            lots of 100% cotton material. It's really inexpensive
            there. I got some really nice 100% cotton for $2 a
            yard there on their clearence table. Also you could
            check the clearence tables at JoAnn's.

            That's what I can tell you.

            Maria
            --- Sarah Natividad <sarah.natividad@...> wrote:

            > My name is Sarah Natividad and I am new to medieval
            > re-enactment.
            > I've hung out with SCA types in the past and I have
            > experience making
            > stage costumes and doing all kinds of fiber arts, as
            > well as basic
            > herb lore. I love sharing my knowledge. I
            > currently have a business
            > making and selling crafts, but I'm looking to expand
            > it into something
            > I can make in larger batches, so I decided to try
            > selling my herbal
            > wares (and possibly some textile wares, like belts)
            > at SCA events. I
            > am not currently an SCA member, but my brother (who
            > will be selling
            > with me) is a member of another medieval society
            > that mostly does
            > fighting. We'll be making and selling strewing herb
            > blends, and pots
            > of herbal salves made with medieval techniques and
            > herbs. We are in
            > the kingdom of Artemisia, barony of Loch Salann
            > (Utah). We'll be
            > attending our first event the end of this month.
            >
            > I need advice relating to costume and etiquette.
            > I've made medieval
            > stage costumes before, but I have to costume my
            > entire family (me +
            > hubby + 4 kids ages 9 to 1) and even though I'm a
            > perfectionist with a
            > thorough knowledge of textile fibers, I really can't
            > afford any
            > fabrics much more expensive than a couple of dollars
            > a yard. We can
            > borrow some garb from my brother's friend for the
            > kids, but I still
            > have to make some for my husband and me, plus extra
            > for my 7 year old.
            > (He's diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome but we
            > think he may have OCD
            > too, and the idea of a medieval campout where there
            > isn't a sink to
            > wash his hands every hour is bad enough for him, let
            > alone not being
            > able to change his clothes for 4 days. I think it
            > would be a good
            > experience for him though, so we're bringing him
            > anyway.) Anyway, the
            > point is that I really don't have a lot of time and
            > money, and I'm
            > tempted to take shortcuts like buying one of those
            > commercially
            > available "medieval" costume patterns (I can draft
            > my own... IF I can
            > get an accurate set of my own measurements...) and
            > using fabrics that
            > aren't period (like polyester). I'm aware of the
            > evil properties of
            > such fibers, but I'd rather use them than go naked.
            > Also I don't have
            > any medieval shoes whatsoever. Would I get in
            > trouble with the Garb
            > Police if my kids and I run around in garb and
            > sneakers?
            >
            > Also I am concerned about violating etiquette. I'm
            > a generally polite
            > person but I'm not used to having to respect rank
            > and address some
            > people by a different greeting (e.g. "your
            > excellency") according to
            > rank. Any tips as to how one could easily tell what
            > greeting to use
            > for which person?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Sarah
            >
            >
          • Susan B. Farmer
            Quoting Sarah Natividad : *snip* ... First off, your sons needs supercede everything else. There was a lady that asked much the
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 4, 2007
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              Quoting Sarah Natividad <sarah.natividad@...>:

              *snip*

              >
              > I need advice relating to costume and etiquette. I've made medieval
              > stage costumes before, but I have to costume my entire family (me +
              > hubby + 4 kids ages 9 to 1) and even though I'm a perfectionist with a
              > thorough knowledge of textile fibers, I really can't afford any
              > fabrics much more expensive than a couple of dollars a yard. We can
              > borrow some garb from my brother's friend for the kids, but I still
              > have to make some for my husband and me, plus extra for my 7 year old.
              > (He's diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome but we think he may have OCD
              > too, and the idea of a medieval campout where there isn't a sink to
              > wash his hands every hour is bad enough for him, let alone not being
              > able to change his clothes for 4 days. I think it would be a good
              > experience for him though, so we're bringing him anyway.) Anyway, the
              > point is that I really don't have a lot of time and money, and I'm
              > tempted to take shortcuts like buying one of those commercially
              > available "medieval" costume patterns (I can draft my own... IF I can
              > get an accurate set of my own measurements...) and using fabrics that
              > aren't period (like polyester). I'm aware of the evil properties of
              > such fibers, but I'd rather use them than go naked. Also I don't have
              > any medieval shoes whatsoever. Would I get in trouble with the Garb
              > Police if my kids and I run around in garb and sneakers?
              >

              First off, your sons needs supercede everything else. There was a
              lady that asked much the same question about one of her children --
              the child could only tolerate certain kinds of fabric -- T-shirt knit
              was one of them. Use what he's comfortable in!

              HAving said that, if you possibly can at all, please avoid polyester.
              It doesn't breathe at all. You will *bake* in it. BTDT -- if, of
              course, you're in the far north where you don't have to worry about
              90' temps and 50%+ humidities, then that may not be an issue. Use
              cotton if you can't afford linen. You can frequently get great fabric
              off the $1/yd and $2/yd table at WalMart (if you're lucky enough to
              have a WalMart that still has fabric!) If you don't know what kind of
              fabric you have, burn a small section. If it's cotton, it will smell
              like paper burning and just leave ash behind. If it's polyester, it
              will melt and leave a hard bead -- which is another reason to avoid
              polyester -- it's flamable and it can cause nasty burns as it melts.

              WEar what's comfortable on your feet. I've worn sneakers. Right now,
              I wear Easy Spirit shoes for the arch support. Sandals might be
              another option for you, but they generally don't have enough arch for
              me.

              As far as the Medieval Patterns -- some of them are rather nice. For
              somebody who's new, they're more than adequate! Even the Bible Tunic
              patterns work quite nicely. Simplicity has a "peasant" pattern that
              I've used before.

              > Also I am concerned about violating etiquette. I'm a generally polite
              > person but I'm not used to having to respect rank and address some
              > people by a different greeting (e.g. "your excellency") according to
              > rank. Any tips as to how one could easily tell what greeting to use
              > for which person?

              "My lord" and/or "My lady" will suffice for just about anybody -- even
              if they're wearing Shiny Hats with Points on them. If they *are*
              wearing a coronet of some sort, "Your Excellency" is a really good
              place to start. There are ways to tell the Pointy Hats apart, here's
              a nice little page
              http://www.sca-altavia.org/FAQ/FAQcirclets.html
              If in doubt -- ask! "Pardon me, my lord/lady, I"m new here, what does
              that coronet that you wear signify" works quite nicely. You'll find
              folks generally very happy to talk in the SCA. If you're in a crowd,
              follow the crowd -- If they all bow/curtsey, generally that's because
              the King and or Queen just walked by.

              Check your kingdom web site -- they generally have pictures of the
              King and Queen -- and they often list the royal progress -- which
              events that they're going to be at! -- so you'll have some idea of if
              they're going to be at your event or not.

              One thing that's different from say a Ren Faire or the Civil War Guys
              ... we're pretty laid back. You don't have to be perfect your first
              time out -- in fact, you don't ever have to be *perfect* unless you
              want to be. Authenticity is a continuum and a journey. You're here
              to have fun!

              jerusha
              -----
              Susan Farmer
              sfarmer@...
              University of Tennessee
              Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
              http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
            • David Roland
              First of all don t worry about not being a member. It is estimated that between half and 2/3 of the people that play in the SCA aren t paid members. You have
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 4, 2007
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                First of all don't worry about not being a member. It is estimated
                that between half and 2/3 of the people that play in the SCA aren't
                paid members. You have to pay the $3 surcharger per person but
                that's about it for now.

                When you get to site's check-in (Troll, Gate etc) just let them know
                that you are all new to the SCA. By the way there may be something
                at the site called "Gold Key". Gold Key is the loaner garb. You
                should be able to contact the area Chatelain or the event
                Autocrat/Steward to see if Gold Key will be available. That should
                help you with the garb for the 1st time event. You can then make
                garb at a more leisurely pace.

                When in doubt of something you want to do or say. ASK. We're
                friendly folks in the SCA and we like to help so ask. If you don't
                know the proper way to greet someone you can simply say, "I'm new
                and this is my first event, how would I properly greet you?" Useful
                for anyone who has metal pointy things sitting on their head. And
                you will learn something and perhaps start a contact in the SCA.
                Or "I'm new and this is my first event, what are they/you doing?"
                Be prepared for enthusiastic and perhaps long answers to this
                question though. :-) Also a good way to meet people and make
                friends.

                If you truly get lost or simply are in need of help, at most events
                you simply need to ask for help and anywhere between 5 and 25 folks
                will show up to help on average. Anyone wearing a white belt (By
                the way that signifies they are a KNIGHT in the SCA and they're the
                only ones allowed to wear a white belt,) can be of good help for
                just about anything. Also look for folks who have a Pelican on them
                somewhere, medallion, pin, embroidery etc, as well as anyone who has
                laurel wreath symbol, medallion, pin, embroidery etc. These folks
                are generally nice, knowledgeable and helpful. You can ask them how
                they earned those symbols and they'll tell you. Great way to start
                a conversation and meet people.

                Common courtesy is fine in the SCA. You don't need to try and speak
                any other way than you normally do, though always speak politely.
                No need for the Thees and Thous and Good Doom to you.

                Remember we're an educational organization whose area of focus is
                the pre 17th century world. We feel you learn best by doing and so
                we recreate (not reenact) the fun parts of that history. All you
                have to do at your first event is wear an attempt at pre-17th
                century clothes, show up and try to learn.

                By the way if anyone is rude to you, be nice about it and walk
                away. If someone insists on continuously being rude and demanding
                of you... remember those folks I said to talk to? The Knight,
                Pelican and Laurel? Just let them know someone's being mean and I
                assure you it will be dealt with appropriately.

                That kind of thing is rare so look forward to having fun with the
                family at the event. It sounds like you have some great skills
                already that you will be bringing with you to the SCA. I know in my
                neck of the woods there aren't a lot of folks who do what you do.
                You'll fit right in really and what you don't know should be pretty
                easy to pick up.

                Here is a .pdf document that should help you prepare for that first
                event.

                http://www.sca.org/officers/chatelain/ForwardIntothePast.pdf

                And here is a webpage that is just fun to look at that can take you
                through a virtual event from the eyes of a rather well known
                monkey. Its from the West Kingdom but it is applicable everywhere.

                http://www.wodefordhall.com/georgetourney.htm

                Have fun, enjoy and let us know how things went.

                Best wishes for you and your family.

                Ian the Green
              • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                ... You probably *don t* have to costume your family for your first event. Most S.C.A. branches maintain collections of appropriate clothing that can be
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 6, 2007
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                  Sarah Natividad wrote:
                  > . . .We are in the kingdom of Artemisia, barony of Loch Salann (Utah).
                  > We'll be attending our first event the end of this month.. . .

                  > . . .I have to costume my entire family (me + hubby + 4 kids ages 9 to
                  > 1). . .

                  You probably *don't* have to costume your family for your first event.
                  Most S.C.A. branches maintain collections of appropriate clothing that
                  can be borrowed by newcomers. Contact your barony's hospitaler
                  <http://www.lochsalann.org/officers.htm> and say the magic words:
                  "loaner garb".

                  > I really don't have a lot of time and money, and I'm tempted to take
                  > shortcuts like buying one of those commercially available "medieval"
                  > costume patterns (I can draft my own... IF I can get an accurate set
                  > of my own measurements...) and using fabrics that aren't period (like
                  > polyester). I'm aware of the evil properties of such fibers, but I'd
                  > rather use them than go naked.

                  You don't need a lot of time to make something accurate. A basic tunic
                  is just about the quickest thing you can sew, certainly quicker than a
                  "medieval maiden" gown based on a pattern, and tunics were worn all
                  over Europe for almost all of the S.C.A.'s core period, with variations
                  in details like the shape of necklines and sleeves and the type and
                  position of trims. If you use medieval methods--an approach known as
                  "rectangular construction"--you'll also need less fabric.

                  There are online several good articles on how to make a tunic based on
                  the finds classed as "Type 1" by Nockert
                  <http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/cloth/type1.html>, each
                  with its own strengths. Jane Stockton's "Getting Started with Tunics"
                  <http://needleprayse.webcon.net.au/research/index.html> is a good
                  overview of how one is put together, with information on plausible
                  colors and details you can vary to get a look you like. Reconstructing
                  History's "Your First Garb"
                  <http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/index.php?c=8&d=141&a=126&w=2>
                  takes a slightly different approach to assembly, and has more
                  information on fabric choice. And Cynthia du Pré Argent has an
                  interactive worksheet
                  <http://www.virtue.to/articles/tunic_worksheet.html> into which you can
                  put your measurements to get fabric measurements automatically
                  calculated for you. (Click "feed them into this form".)

                  Just the tunic is enough (for males or females of all ages) for a first
                  outfit. If you want a more "complete" look, you might add a hood
                  <http://www.virtue.to/articles/hoodlum.html>, or (for a male persona) a
                  coif <http://www.virtue.to/articles/coif.html> or (for a female
                  persona) a veil <http://www.virtue.to/articles/veils.html>, to keep the
                  sun off your head and for that extra dash of authenticity. A plain
                  leather belt with a simple buckle, a pouch or satchel (or both) to keep
                  your "stuff" in
                  <http://moas.atlantia.sca.org/wsnlinks/index.php?
                  action=displaycat&catid=288>, and some unobtrusive shoes (or period
                  ones) will round out the look. Those with male personae who are
                  uncomfortable in skirts alone may wear hosen or, as early-period
                  alternative, trews <http://www.regia.org/members/basclot5d.htm>. (I
                  suppose those with female personae could do likewise, but as their
                  skirts will fall to the floor, trews or hosen won't show.)

                  Where fabrics are concerned, there's "not period" and then there's
                  "polyester". If you can't afford $6.00/yd for linen
                  <http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?
                  goto=fabric_type&menu=f&fabric_type=1>, pick a cotton that isn't too
                  polished and make do. It will at least breathe, and won't scream
                  "utterly modern" from 100 yards. (But check your local JoAnn's first.
                  Many of them carry some linen, and it regularly goes on sale. Or if
                  you happen to have a "40% off a single cut of fabric" coupon, you could
                  get one l-o-n-g piece for the whole family. Dressing in matching
                  colors was kind of a "thing" for family groups in some places at some
                  times in the Middle Ages, so it won't look "off" if you do it.)

                  > Also I don't have any medieval shoes whatsoever. Would I get in
                  > trouble with the Garb Police if my kids and I run around in garb and
                  > sneakers?

                  There are no Garb Police. Whether the other people at the event will
                  consider sneakers an offense against the spirit of the event is
                  something that varies from place to place, and as I'm nowhere near you,
                  I can't comment on whether it's likely to happen where you are.

                  It doesn't take an enormous amount of time or money to make a simple,
                  serviceable shoe
                  <http://members.ozemail.com.au/~chrisandpeter/shoe/construction.html>.
                  It's not terribly expensive, either, if you buy leather on sale and in
                  large pieces.

                  If, on the other hand, shoe-making isn't in the cards for you at the
                  moment, you still have better options than sneakers, which *really*
                  stick out at events and draw a lot of attention. (I've seen it.) Look
                  at drawings and photos of real medieval shoes
                  <http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOEHOME.HTM>, then
                  head to a discount shoe place to find something similar-looking.
                  Failing that, just pick something matte, in a brown or black, that
                  won't call attention to itself--sandals, "China flats", or even black
                  ballet slippers will do in a pinch.


                  Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                  Barony of Bryn Gwlad
                  Kingdom of Ansteorra
                  <mailto:Coblaith@...>
                • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                  ... There s a picture of your current king and queen at . Anybody you see who s wearing one of those crowns is
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jul 6, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Sarah Natividad wrote:
                    > . . .We are in the kingdom of Artemisia, barony of Loch Salann (Utah).
                    > We'll be attending our first event the end of this month.

                    > . . .I am concerned about violating etiquette. I'm a generally polite
                    > person but I'm not used to having to respect rank and address some
                    > people by a different greeting (e.g. "your excellency") according to
                    > rank. Any tips as to how one could easily tell what greeting to use
                    > for which person?

                    There's a picture of your current king and queen at
                    <http://www.artemisia.sca.org/regnum.htm>. Anybody you see who's
                    wearing one of those crowns is probably "Your Majesty".

                    Cunnan has articles on the Society-wide conventions for coronets
                    <http://cunnan.sca.org.au/wiki/Coronet> and related forms of address
                    <http://cunnan.sca.org.au/wiki/Honorific>. But nobody will expect you
                    to have all that down-pat when you begin.

                    In Artemisia, metal circlets are worn only by Royal Peers and the
                    Baronage <http://www.artemisia.sca.org/law.htm>. Therefore, you can
                    rest assured that anybody you meet who's got any kind of "brass hat" is
                    at least entitled to be called "Your Excellency". In my area,
                    newcomers are often encouraged to use that term of address for all such
                    individuals until they learn to recognize the various crowns and
                    coronets. (It's not the highest title all of them are entitled to use,
                    but it is a valid one for all of them, and respectful.) That may not
                    be the case in Artemisia; ask your hospitaler
                    <http://www.lochsalann.org/officers.htm>.


                    Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                    Barony of Bryn Gwlad
                    Kingdom of Ansteorra
                    <mailto:Coblaith@...>
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