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Re: [SCA Newcomers] another dumb question

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  • Dianne & Greg Stucki
    ... You most certainly can machine sew the seams if that is what you wish to do. There are no stitch police! (Heaven help ME if there were!) Laurensa
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 2, 2007
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      At 07:22 PM 6/2/2007, you wrote:
      >I've been reading and reading about garb and was wondering -- do you
      >have to handsew the clothes? I'm working on a tunic for my husband.
      >Can you machine sew the seams, then handsew hems and trim and all
      >that? Is there "stitch police" who lift your skirts to check your
      >seams? Just wondering....


      You most certainly can machine sew the seams if that is what you wish
      to do. There are no stitch police! (Heaven help ME if there were!)

      Laurensa
    • Elizabeth Cember
      Having a bit of handsewing to do can be nice at events though. http://www.needlenthread.com/2006/10/video-library-of-hand-embroidery.html has videos of how to
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 2, 2007
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        Having a bit of handsewing to do can be nice at events though.

        http://www.needlenthread.com/2006/10/video-library-of-hand-embroidery.html has videos of how to do various embroidery stitches. Could be fun to add to your cuffs or a tablecloth or something.

        Elspeth

        "I slept and dreamt that life was joy,
        I woke and saw that life was duty,
        I acted and behold, duty was joy"
        -- Rabinranath Tagore

        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Bulgarelli Maria <scarlettmb@...>
        To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, June 2, 2007 8:12:55 PM
        Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] another dumb question













        LOL I machine sew my hems and a lot of time my trim

        depending on where it's going. Don't worry about

        that. Most of us don't grow the cotton or flax, spin

        it and then weave it to make the material. (I won't

        say no one does it, cause then someone will point out

        that such and such Laurel did just that.)



        So machine sew anything you want to. And have fun.



        Maria

        --- jimmielou111 <jimmielou111@ yahoo.com> wrote:



        > I've been reading and reading about garb and was

        > wondering -- do you

        > have to handsew the clothes? I'm working on a tunic

        > for my husband.

        > Can you machine sew the seams, then handsew hems and

        > trim and all

        > that? Is there "stitch police" who lift your skirts

        > to check your

        > seams? Just wondering... .

        >

        >














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      • Denise Keppel
        One lovely lady in my shire who does wonderful work would be in trouble if she couldn t hire the nuns of the house of Kenmore to do some work for her. ...
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 2, 2007
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          One lovely lady in my shire who does wonderful work
          would be in trouble if she couldn't hire the nuns of
          the house of Kenmore to do some work for her.
          --- jimmielou111 <jimmielou111@...> wrote:

          > I've been reading and reading about garb and was
          > wondering -- do you
          > have to handsew the clothes? I'm working on a tunic
          > for my husband.
          > Can you machine sew the seams, then handsew hems and
          > trim and all
          > that? Is there "stitch police" who lift your skirts
          > to check your
          > seams? Just wondering....
          >
          >




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        • Jibra'il 'Attar.
          I m one of those crazy people that enjoys hand-sewing, especially the detail work...like eyelets and buttons and hems and trim. But right now, I m in mass
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 2, 2007
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            I'm one of those crazy people that enjoys hand-sewing, especially the
            detail work...like eyelets and buttons and hems and trim. But right
            now, I'm in mass production mode, sewing War garb for Lilies (which is
            only 5 days away...OMG!). Machine sewing is my friend right about now.

            And honestly, if you're new to sewing...or new period...use a machine
            to start with until you're used to the patterns you're working with.
            After a few years of playing with the same pattern, you'll get a feel
            for the garments you're making...and then you'll feel a little more
            courageous about hand-sewing one or two times.

            Jibra'il.
          • bronwynmgn@aol.com
            In a message dated 6/2/2007 7:22:36 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, jimmielou111@yahoo.com writes:
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 3, 2007
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              In a message dated 6/2/2007 7:22:36 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
              jimmielou111@... writes:

              <<I've been reading and reading about garb and was wondering -- do you
              have to handsew the clothes? I'm working on a tunic for my husband.
              Can you machine sew the seams, then handsew hems and trim and all
              that? Is there "stitch police" who lift your skirts to check your
              seams? Just wondering....>>

              Many people do all the sewing by machine, including hems and trim, or buy
              machine-sewn garb. Some people who are more concerned with the look will do
              the main seams by machine and any visible stitching by hand. Then there are
              the die-hard authenticists like me who do all of it by hand, but that is our
              choice and is made for a variety of reasons, none of them having to do with
              anybody making us feel like we should. I hand sew for three reasons: 1) I hate
              sewing machines; 2) this way I can work on my projects at events or anywhere
              I happen to be; and 3) it's the way it was done in period, and it's a chore
              my persona might well have done (not necessarily; premade clothing was
              available for purchase in some places at some times, or I could have commissioned it
              from someone else. But my husband is a tailor and I would most likely have
              helped in his shop anyway).

              Are there people who will criticize your garb? Unfortunately, there are
              some rare insecure folks who need to make themselves feel bigger by doing that.
              But in general, most people a) don't care how you put your garb together or
              if you bought serged stuff from a merchant, and b) are too polite to look at
              your sewing unless you are specifically discussing your sewing. I have
              people looking at my seams all the time, but that's because I'm known as someone
              who handsews everything (which people think is a bit weird) and I'm usually
              sewing something at the event anyway.


              Brangwayna Morgan
              Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
              Lancaster, PA



              ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


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            • bronwynmgn@aol.com
              In a message dated 6/2/2007 8:13:52 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, scarlettmb@sbcglobal.net writes:
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 3, 2007
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                In a message dated 6/2/2007 8:13:52 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                scarlettmb@... writes:

                <<Most of us don't grow the cotton or flax, spin
                it and then weave it to make the material. >>

                And honestly, most period people didn't do that either. Most period people
                probably bought their fabric ready-made, or either bought clothes off the peg
                or commissioned a tailor to make stuff for them. Even people who worked in
                the spinning and weaving trades probably bought some of their fabric or
                clothes. There were lots of specialty clothing workers - tailors, chaucers who
                made hose, cordwainers who made shoes, people who made hoods and hats, etc.
                Somebody had to be buying what they made.


                Brangwayna Morgan
                Shire of Silver Rylle, East Kingdom
                Lancaster, PA



                ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


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