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naming a household (was: Greetings!)

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  • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
    ... That depends upon what you mean by appropriate . If you re interested in choosing a name that might actually have been used by a medieval or Renaissance
    Message 1 of 44 , Jun 1, 2007
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      > There are several of us attending for the first time, so I would like
      > to form a household, in order to give us some structure (And because
      > it tickles me). Is it appropriate to use my byname (clearwater, in
      > reference to the tiny thorpe from which I hail) as the house/family
      > name?

      That depends upon what you mean by "appropriate".

      If you're interested in choosing a name that might actually have been
      used by a medieval or Renaissance group, or one that you might
      register later, you'll want to do some research before you settle on
      anything. The Medieval Names Archive has some articles that might help
      get you started <http://s-gabriel.org/names/nonhuman.shtml>.

      If it's important to you that your byname be the name of your
      household, of course, you'll want to make sure you're well settled on a
      name for yourself before you extend it to this purpose. It might be
      better, if you haven't already documented your personal name, to choose
      an independent name for the household following documented practices.


      Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      Barony of Bryn Gwlad
      Kingdom of Ansteorra
      <mailto:Coblaith@...>
    • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      ... It s perfectly acceptable to put up hangings that are decorative, rather than heraldic, in nature. The practice is documentable to period as well as very
      Message 44 of 44 , Jun 1, 2007
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        emrys_clearwater wrote:
        > would it be appropriate to use a plain banner (field sans blazon)
        > until I have heraldry?

        It's perfectly acceptable to put up hangings that are decorative,
        rather than heraldic, in nature. The practice is documentable to
        period as well as very common in the S.C.A.

        The S.C.A. doesn't register single tinctures, including furs, so you
        can hang a plain banner without fear of violating anyone's rights.
        They can be very effective--pennons alternating the tinctures you've
        chosen can give a whole encampment "punch", for example.

        More elaborate banners are also fine, as long as they don't have a
        heraldic look. (Technically, you can also hang banners that _do_ look
        heraldic, but if you haven't put your design through the
        conflict-checking process, you might accidentally display someone
        else's registered device--a definite no-no.) Repeated floral or
        geometric motifs, scenes from famous stories, allegorical scenes, and
        overall decorative patterns are popular designs. Appliqué
        <http://www.bayrose.org/wkneedle/Articles/applique.html>, tapestry
        <http://www.metmuseum.org/explore/Unicorn/unicorn_inside.htm>,
        embroidery <http://www.bayrose.org/wkneedle/Articles/bayeux.html>, and
        painting <http://bryn-gwlad.ansteorra.org/articles/as/banner01/> are
        popular methods.


        Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        Barony of Bryn Gwlad
        Kingdom of Ansteorra
        <mailto:Coblaith@...>
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